(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Oakwood Bulletin"

HUNTSVILLE, ALABAMA 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



Oakwood College 

Is accredited by: 
The Commission on Colleges of the Southem 
Association of Colleges and Schools (1 866 South- 
em Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097; Tele- 
phone number 404-679-4501 ) to award associate 
and baccalaureate degrees; and the Adventist 
Accrediting Associaton of the Department of Edu- 
cation of the General Conference of Seventh-day 
Adventists 

Offers programs accredited by tlie: 
Association of Collegiate Business 

Schools and Programs 
Council on Social Work Education 
National Council for Accreditation of 

Teacher Education 

Offers programs approved by ttie: 
Alabama Board of Nursing 
Alabama State Department of Education 
American Dietetics Association 
General Conference of Seventh-day 
Adventist Department of Education 

Accreditation documents may be viewed in the office 
of the Vice President for Academic Affairs. 



Affairs. Each student is responsible for keeping in- 
formed of current graduation requirements in the 
appropriate degree program. 

Equal Opportunity Commitment 

Oakwood College is committed to providing equal 
opportunity for all qualified persons. It does not 
discriminate on the basis of race, color, national or 
ethnic origin, gender, marital status, or handicap in 
the administration of its educational and admissions 
policies, financial affairs, employment policies and 
programs, student life and services, or any other 
college-administered program. 

Address: 

Oakwood College 

7000 Adventist Boulevard 

Huntsville, AL 35896 

Telephone: 

(256) 726-7000 

FAX: 

(256) 726-7404 

Directory: 



Policy Revisions 

Oakwood College reserves the right to make changes 
relating to the Bulletin. A summary of any changes, 
including fees and other charges, course changes, 
and academic requirements for graduation, shall be 
published cumulatively in the yearly class schedule. 
Said publication of changes shall be considered 
adequate and effective notice for all students. De- 
tailed information on changes will be maintained in 
the Records Office and in the Office of Academic 



Admissions .-...800-358-3978 

In Alabama 256-726-7030 

FAX 256-726-7154 

Credit and Collections 256-726-7379 

FAX 256-726-7461 

Financial Aid 800-824-5321 

In Alabama 256-726-7210 

FAX 256-726-7474 

Recruitment 800-824-5312 

In Alabama 256-726-7356 

FAX 256-726-7154 



Direct Correspondence Accordingly: 

President General Administration 

VP for Academic Affairs Academic Policies 

VP for Student Services Residence Information 

Dir. of Enrollment Mgmt Admissions/Application 

Dir of Records Transcripts, Grade Reports 

Dir. of Financial Aid Federal Financial Aid 

Dir. of Credit and Collections Student Accounts 

Dir. of Alumni Affairs Alumni Concerns 



Cover Photo: Business and Technology Complex 



OAKWOOD 

COLLEGE 

2001-2003 

BULLETIN 




Education, ExcellencCy Eternity 



Table of Contents ^ 

A Message From the President: 3 01 

Academic Calendar 4 w 

Mission Statement 8 

Admission Standards 12 ^ 

Financial Policies 17 ^ 

Student Life and Services 28 

Academic Policies 35 ^ 

Degrees Requirements 54 ^ 

DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 

Biological Sciences 58 ^ 

Business and Information Systems 64 Ai 

Chemistry 80 

Education 88 ^ 

English and Communications 103 O^ 

Family and Consumer Sciences 121 

Health and Physical Education 130 w 

History 137 ^ 

Mathematics and Computer Science 144 

Music 153 ^ 

Nursing 165 ^ 

Psychology 174 

Religion and Theology 181 ^ 

Social Work 190 ^ 

Adult and Continuing Education 194 ^ 

m 

Board of Trustees 198 

Administration and Staff 199 Sm 

Faculty 202 ^ 

Index 210 _ 



A Message From the President: 

To readers of this new Oakwood College Bulletin for 2001-2003, I say, "Welcome!" We 
are happy for your interest in Oakwood and hope that you have already made, or are leaning 
toward making, this your college of choice. Oakwood College was recently listed among the "top 
institutions of higher learning in the Southern region during year 2000" by U.S. News and World 
Repoii\r\ its annual issue rating colleges and universities in America. 

Like all institutions of higher learning, matriculation at Oakwood can be a bit challenging at 
first. Each degree choice requires a comprehensive curriculum of courses so that you can best 
understand the subject matter and fulfill the requirements of the respective degrees. Further, 
college life must govern itself by basic guidelines for which you may not initially see the rationale. 
For this reason, this book you have in your hand will prove invaluable as you introduce yourself to 
the world of higher education. There are many options available to you. Oakwood's degree offer- 
ings comprise more different career paths than ever before. In this bulletin, classes you will take 
are clearly outlined, along with capsule descriptions. 

The bulletin offers an introduction to Oakwood, the campus, the buildings, the staff, the faculty. 
The people listed here as administrators, staff, and faculty are committed to helping you to accom- 
plish your educational goals. Many of you will make your full-time home with us at Oakwood. You 
will live for the first time in a residence hall with other young people. Part of your education will be 
the opportunity to socialize on a wider scale than you ever have before. The things you need to 
know are on these pages. 

At Oakwood your spiritual development is a vital concern. Thus, preparation for service to God 
and humanity is a main component of learning. The church and the Office of Spiritual Life plan 
and implement activities and programs to enhance the students' personal experience with Christ. 
What we desire for you is twofold: that you attain all the educational tools (mental, physical, 
spiritual, and social) that you need to succeed in this life, and that you leave Oakwood with a 
strong faith and commitment that transcends this present world. 

Finally, Oakwood offers all the elements of success. The knowledge is here. The positive 
social experiences are here. The spiritual life is here. Now the opportunity is yours. You must 
engage yourself; you must take the initiative in seeking every source of support. The effort you put 
into your college experience will determine what you get out of it. 

As you move toward the goals of Education, Excellence, Eternity, I challenge you to make 
this one of the most important journeys of your life. 



Dr. Delbert W. Baker 
President 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 2001 -2002 

Events Fall Semester 

Faculty/Staff Colloquium Aug. 8-11 

Testing New Students Aug. 17 

Registration for Freshmen and New Students Only Aug. 19 

Freshmen and New Students' Ceremony Aug. 19 

Regular Registration for Former Students/Late Registration 

for Students Enrolled Spring Semester Aug. 20 

Registration for Freshmen Only Aug. 21 

Regular Registration for Former Students/Late Registration 

for Students Enrolled Spring Semester Aug. 21 

Instruction Begins/Drop-Add/Late Registration Fees Begin Aug. 22 

Drop/Add Fee Begins Aug. 23 

Freshmen Consecration Aug. 24 

Last Day for Final Acceptance Aug. 24 

Last Day to Enter Classes Aug. 29 

Registration Ends Aug. 29 

Last Day for 100 Percent Tuition Refund, Less $100 Charge Aug. 31 

Labor Day Observed Sept. 3 

Last Day to Add a Class to Existing Schedule Sept. 4 

Convocation Sept. 4 

Last Day to Financially Clear Sept. 5 

Classes Organized (Seniors, Juniors, and Sophomores) Sept. 5 

Last Day for 90 Percent Tuition Refund Sept. 7 

Last Day for 75 Percent Tuition Refund Sept. 21 

New Seniors/Advisors Submit AFG/FYS to Chairs Sept. 21 

English Proficiency Exam (All Juniors) Sept. 23 

New Seniors' AFG/FYS Due in Records Office From Chairs Oct. 1 

Last Day for 50 Percent Tuition Refund Oct. 5 

Last Day to Drop a Class With a "W" Oct. 19 

Advisee Rosters Due in Records Office From Chairs Oct. 23 

Advising/Regular Registration for Spring Semester Nov 12-16 

Thanksgiving Break Nov. 19-23 

Classes Resume Nov 26 

Last Day to Process Incomplete/Terminal Leave Nov 26 

Instruction Ends Dec. 7 

Freshmen Composition Exit Exam Dec. 9 

Final Exams Dec. 9-13 

All Grades Due Dec. 17 

Christmas/New Year's Recess Dec. 17- Jan. 4 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 2001-2002 



Events 



Spring Semester 



Orientation/Testing New Students Jan. 7 

Financial Clearance (All) Jan. 7 

Registration for New and Former Students/Late Registration 

for Students Enrolled Fall Semester Jan. 7, 8 

Instruction/Late Registration Fee Begins Jan. 9 

Drop/Add Fee Begins Jan. 10 

Senior Presentation Jan. 16 

New 2002 Seniors/Advisors Submit AFG/FYS to Chairs Jan. 16 

Registration Ends Jan. 16 

Last Day for 100 Percent Tuition Refund, Less $100 Charge Jan. 18 

M.L.King Birthday Observed Jan. 21 

Last Day to Add to Existing Schedule Jan. 22 

Last Day to Financially Clear Jan. 23 

Last Day for 90 Percent Tuition Refund Jan. 25 

English Proficiency Exam Jan. 27 

Last Day to AcceptYear 2002 Seniors' AFG/FYS in Records Office Jan. 30 

Last Day for 75 Percent Tuition Refund Feb. 8 

Last Day for 50 Percent Tuition Refund Feb. 22 

Senior Deadline for Transfer Credit/I ncompletes, Deferred Grades Mar. 1 

Perspective Year 2003 Seniors' AFG/FYS to Chairs Mar. 3 

Spring Break Begins Mar. 4-8 

Classes Resume Mar 11 

Tentative Graduation List to Chairs Mar. 14 

Last Day to Drop a Class With a"W" Mar. 15 

Advising/Regular Registration for Fall Semester Mar. 18-22 

Prospective Year 2003 Seniors' AFG/FYS Due in Records Office Mar. 25 

Alumni Weekend Mar. 28-31 

Final Graduation List Apr. 8 

Advisee Rosters Due in Records Office Apr. 9 

Honors Convocation Apr. 9 

Last Day to Process Incomplete/Terminal Leave Apr. 22 

Instruction Ends Apr. 26 

Freshman English Composition Exit Exam Apr. 28 

Final Exams Apr.28-May2 

Registration and Payment of Fees for English Proficiency May 1 

All Grades Due May 6 

Consecration May 10 

Baccalaureate/Commencement May 11 

Summer Class Session I May 13 

English Proficiency Exam May 14 

Summer Class Session II June 3 

Summer Class Session III June 24 



*These dates are subject to change without notice. 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 2002-2003 

Events Fall Semester 

Faculty/Staff Colloquium Aug. 7-10 

Freshmen and New Students' Registration/Orientation Aug. 14-20 

Testing New Students Aug. 14 

Registration for Freshmen and New Students Aug. 14-16 

Freshmen Consecration Aug. 16 

Freshmen and New Student Orientation Aug. 18-20 

Classes Dropped if Not Financially Cleared (Students Enrolled Spring Semester) Aug. 19 

Regular Registration for Former Students/Late Registration 

for Students Enrolled Spring Semester Aug. 19, 20 

Instruction Begins/Late Registration for All Students Aug. 21 

Drop/Add Fee Begins Aug. 22 

Last Day for Final Acceptance Aug. 23 

Last Day to Enter Classes Aug. 28 

Late Registration Ends Aug. 28 

Last Day for 100 Percent Tuition Refund, Less $100 Charge Aug. 30 

Labor Day Observed Sept. 2 

Last Day to Add a Class to Existing Schedule Sept. 3 

Academic Convocation Sept. 3 

Last Day to Financially Clear Sept. 4 

Classes Organized (Seniors, Juniors, and Sophomores Sept. 4 

Last Day for 90 Percent Tuition Refund Sept. 6 

Last Day for 75 Percent Tuition Refund Sept. 20 

New Seniors/Advisors Submit AFG/FYS to Chairs Sept. 20 

English Proficiency Exam (All Juniors) Sept. 22 

New Seniors' AFG/FYS Due in Records Office From Chairs Oct. 1 

Last Day for 50 Percent Tuition Refund Oct. 4 

Last Day to Drop a Class With a "W" Oct. 18 

Advisee Rosters Due in Records Office From Chairs Oct. 22 

Advising/Regular Registration for Spring Semester Nov. 11-15 

Thanksgiving Break Nov. 25-29 

Classes Resume Dec. 2 

Last Day to Process Incomplete/Terminal Leave Dec. 2 

Instruction Ends Dec. 6 

Freshmen Comp. Exit Exam Dec. 8 

Final Exams Dec. 8-12 

All Grades Due Dec. 16 

Christmas/New Year's Recess Dec. 16-Jan. 3 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 2002-2003 



Events 



Spring Semester 



Classes Dropped if Not Financially Cleared Jan. 6 

OrientationAesting New Students Jan. 6 

Registration for New and Former Students Begins Jan. 6 

Late Registration for Students Enrolled Fall Semester Jan. 7 

Instruction Begins Jan. 8 

Drop/Add Fee Begins Jan. 9 

Senior Presentation Jan. 15 

New 2003 Seniors/Advisors Submit AFG/FYS to Chairs Jan. 15 

Late Registration Ends Jan. 15 

Last Day for 1 00 Percent Tuition Refund, Less $100 Charge Jan. 17 

M. L. King Birthday Observed Jan. 20 

Last Day to Add to Existing Schedule Jan. 21 

Last Day to Financially Clear Jan. 22 

Last Day for 90 Percent Tuition Refund Jan. 24 

English Proficiency Exam Jan. 26 

Last Day to Accept Year 2003 Seniors' AFG/FYS in Records Office Jan. 29 

Last Day for 75 Percent Tuition Refund Feb. 7 

Last Day for 50 Percent Tuition Refund Feb. 21 

Senior Deadline for Transfer Credit/lncompletes, Deferred Grades Mar. 3 

Prospective Year 2004 Seniors' AFG/FYS to Chairs Mar. 3 

Spring Break Mar. 3-7 

Classes Resume Mar. 10 

Tentative Graduation List to Chairs Mar. 13 

Last Day to Drop a Class With a "W" Mar. 14 

Advising/Regular Registration for Fall Semester Mar. 17-21 

Prospective Year 2004 Seniors' AFG/FYS Due in Records Office Mar. 24 

Final Graduation List Apr. 7 

Honors Convocation Apr. 8 

Advisee Rosters Due in Records Office Apr. 8 

Alumni Weekend Apr. 17-20 

Last Day to Process Incomplete/Terminal Leave Apr. 21 

Instruction Ends Apr. 25 

Freshman English Composition Exit Exam Apr. 27 

Final Exams Apr. 27-May 1 

Registration and Payment of Fees for English Proficiency May 1 

All Grades Due May 5 

Consecration May 9 

Baccalaureate/Commencement May 10 

Summer Class Session I May 12 

English Proficiency Exam May 13 

Summer Class Session II June 2 



*These dates are subject to change without notice. 



Mission Statement 

Oakwood College, a historically Blacl<, primarily liberal arts four-year coeducational Seventh- 
day Adventist institution, founded in 1896, has as its fundamental purpose, quality Christian edu- 
cation. Its mission embodies access to educational opportunity, academic excellence, and spiri- 
tual development for its students who come from diverse geographical, cultural, educational, and 
socioeconomic bacl<grounds. In addition to its emphasis on the liberal arts, the College provides 
biblical, professional, pre-professional, vocational, and continuing education studies. Some of 
these studies emanate from a limited number of institutional cooperative programs. Its programs 
and activities are unequivocally Christian in character, designed to integrate faith and learning, 
encourage a vibrant spiritual experience, prepare individuals for service to God and humanity, and 
provide an atmosphere for appreciation for oneself and affirmation of cultural diversity. 

The Oakwood College mission is stated in seven general goals. 

Spiritual Vitality 

To promote a Christ-centered, Seventh-day Adventist worldview among students, faculty, 
staff, and administrators. 

Educational Excellence 

To demonstrate academic excellence in quality of teaching and learning among both students 
and faculty. 

Nurturing Environment 

To cultivate an inclusive environment that is sensitive to the needs of students, faculty, staff, 
and the extended college community that includes alumni, constituents, friends, and other sup- 
porters. 

Operational Efficiency 

To provide high quality, efficient service that is customer and employee sensitive. 

Resource Development 

To provide sufficient financial resources to support and maintain all aspects of institutional 
advancement and development (i.e., viable academic programs, strong faculty development pro- 
grams, up-to-date instruction, adequate physical facilities, technologically sophisticated campus, 
adequate student housing, sufficient student scholarships, and other physical space needs). 

Institutional Relations 

To enhance the image of the institution by strengthening communication with internal and 
external publics (i.e., an informed student body, and knowledgeable faculty and staff). 

Technology Leadership 

To continue developing a technologically cutting-edge campus that enables students, faculty, 
and staff to be more effective and efficient in teaching-learning processes, support functions, and 
administrative operations. 



Oakwood Facts 



Location 



Oakwood College Is located five miles northwest of the heart of the city of Huntsvllle. Huntsville 
is a cosmopolitan city located In the north central portion of the state of Alabama and nestles In the 
beautiful Tennessee Valley, In the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains. It has a population of 
approximately 1 75,000. The College property consists of 1 , 1 85 acres at an elevation of 1 , 1 00 feet 
above sea level. Currently, 500 acres are under cultivation, and 1 05 acres comprise the main cam- 
pus. 

Student Body 

Cultural diversity abounds on the campus of Oakwood College, where the average enrollment 
of 1 ,700 students come from as many as forty states and thirty countries. The residential facili- 
ties, two male and two female dormitories, house more than 60 percent of the student body. 
Family housing is also available for approximately thirty-three families. 

Faculty 

A dedicated and committed faculty of approximately one hundred-three relate to students in a 
caring and family-like atmosphere that emphasizes academic excellence. Approximately 55 per- 
cent of the faculty hold doctoral degrees. Motivation and academic stimulation characterize the 
"one-on-one" interaction of faculty with students, as they share and model Christian Ideals. 

Religious Institution Exemption 

The college reserves constitutional and statutory rights as a religious Institution and employer 
to give preference to Seventh-day Adventists In admissions and employment. The college believes 
that Title IX regulations are subject to constitutional guarantees against unreasonable entangle- 
ment with or infringements on the religious teachings and practices of the Seventh-day Adventlst 
Church. The college expects students and employees to uphold biblical principles of morality and 
deportment as interpreted by the Seventh-day Adventlst Church. The college claims exemptions 
from the provisions of Title IX set forth In CFR Sections 86.21 , 86.31 , 86.40, and 86.57(b) Insofar 
as they conflict with church teachings and practices of morality, deportment, and appearance. 

Sexual Harassment 

Sexual harassment is prohibited by the college. All students have the right to report and are 
encouraged to report acts of sexual harassment. Contact the Office of Student Services for report- 
ing procedures. 

Disability Accommodations 



In compliance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the college assists and 
makes reasonable accommodations for students who are disabled. For assistance students should 
contact the Center for Academic Advancement. 



Campus Buildings 

East Hall, the oldest building, houses the Division of Advancement and Development. Initial 
work on the building began in 1907 and was completed in 1909. 

The J. L. Moran Hall, completed in 1944, houses faculty offices and classrooms for the De- 
partment of History and the Department of English and Communications. It also has an audito- 
rium with a seating capacity of 500. 

The E. I. Cunningham Hall, completed in 1947, provides residence for female students and 
houses the Center for Academic Advancement, Freshman Studies, Financial Aid, and Adult and 
Continuing Education. 

The Teachers' Cottages, completed in 1947, currently house the Art Program, the Chaplain's 
Office, the Counseling Center, the Health Center, the Literature Evangelist Training Center, and 
the Office of Work Education. 

The W. H. Green Hall, completed in 1952, houses faculty offices and classrooms for the 
Departments of Psychology and Social Work. 

The H. E. Ford Hall, completed in 1954, houses the Student Center, student leadership of- 
fices, and the Student Services Office. 

The F. L. Peterson Hall, completed in 1955, is the residence hall for freshman men. 

The N. E. Ashby Auditorium, constructed in 1956, is the gymnasium. 

The College Market-Post Office Building was completed in 1 957. 

The Physical Plant Department Building was completed in 1959. 

The Anna Knight Hall, completed in 1960 and renovated in 1992, houses the Department of 
Education. 

The G. E. Peters Hall, completed in 1964, houses faculty offices and classrooms for the 
Department of Music, and the fine arts auditorium. 

The Bessie Carter Hall, completed in 1966, is the residence hall for freshman women. 

The W. J. Blake Memorial Center, completed in 1968, contains the administrative offices of 
the college, and the cafeteria. 

The O. B. Edwards Hall, completed in 1969, is the residence hall for upperclass men. 

The Eva B. Dykes Library, completed in 1973, is a learning, resource, and research center. It 
houses a media area with audiovisual equipment and resources, the college archives and mu- 
seum, the Technology Center, the Ellen G. White Estate Branch Office, group study rooms, and 
classrooms. 

The J. T Stafford Building, completed in 1974, is an educational center consisting of class- 
rooms, laboratories, and offices for the Oakwood Academy. 

The W. R. Beach Natatorium, completed in 1974, houses an Olympic-size swimming pool, 
classrooms, and offices for the Department of Physical Education. 

The Oakwood College Church, completed in 1 977, has a seating capacity of 2,700. 

The Moseley Complex, completed in 1977, houses faculty offices and classrooms for the 
Department of Religion and Theology, and the C.T Richards Chapel. 

WOCG, the Oakwood College radio station, is located on Oakwood Road, less than one mile 
west of the central campus. 

The E. A. Cooper Science Complex, completed in 1981, houses laboratories, classrooms, 
offices, and storage space for the Departments of Biological Sciences, Chemistry, Family and 
Consumer Sciences, Mathematics and Computer Science, and Nursing. 

TheNatelkaE. Burrell Hall, renovated in 1982, houses offices and classrooms for the Depart- 
ment of English and Communications. 

The Oakwood College Skating Rink was completed in 1 986 and features adjoining racquetball 
courts. 

The Trula E. Wade Residence Hall, completed in 1991 , is the residence hall for upperclass 
women. 



10 



The Business and Technology Complex, completed in 2001 , houses faculty offices and class- 
rooms for the Business and Information Systems Department, four computer labs, an auditorium 
that seats more than 300 people, a Board of Trustees meeting room, and facilities for the Informa- 
tion Technology Department. The facility is fully networked, Internet and audiovisual ready, with 
cutting-edge technology. 



S) 


^^|k29R| 


Br, 


1 ! \ 

1 i ! 'i 

M 1 y 



i 




11 



Admission Standards 
General Information 

Oakwood College welcomes applicants regardless of race, color, nationality, ethnicity, sex, or 
physical challenges. Students who meet the academic requirements and character expectations 
of the college and are willing to adjust to and to be comfortable within its religious, social, and 
cultural atmosphere, may be admitted subject to available space. 

Oakwood College is sponsored and financed primarily by the Seventh-day Adventist Church, 
of which the majority of its students are members. Although religious affiliation is not a require- 
ment for admission, all students are expected to abide by the policies and standards of the college 
as outlined in the College Bulletin ax\6 in the Student Handbook. Applicants are required to sign a 
pledge agreeing to the Code of Student Conduct prior to completing registraton. 

The college reserves the right to refuse admission to any applicant who purposely supplies 
wrongful information or deliberately omits pertinent information. Such deception, if discovered 
later, may cause a student to be subject to dismissal. 

Admission to the college does not guarantee admission to a specific department or program. 
Applications for general admission will be kept on file for two years. The College Board of Trust- 
ees, upon recommendation by the president, approves all admission policies. 

Application and Acceptance 

Where to Write: Inquiries about admission and acceptance should be addressed to: 
Oakwood College Toll Free: (800)824-5312 

Admissions Office Telephone: (256)726-7030 

7000 Adventist Boulevard Fax: (256)726-7154 

Huntsville, AL 35896 E-mail: admission@oakwood.edu 

Admission of New Students 

Admission of new students (U.S. citizens and permanent residents) to Oakwood College is 
either Regular or Conditional. International, transfer, and adult continuing education students 
should refer to guidelines as listed under Admission of International Applicants, Admission of 
Transfer Applicants and Admission of Adult and Continuing Education Applicants. 

Regular Status 

1 . Completed application form signed and dated along with a nonrefundable $20 fee. 

2. Official high school verifying graduation with a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of at 
least 2.00 on a 4.00 grading scale (home school applicants see the Home School sec- 
tion). 

OR 
General Education Diploma (GED) 

Recommended core curriculum requirements for entrance to the undergraduate pro- 
gram*: 

a. English 4 Units 

b. Mathematics 2 Units (Including algebra) 

c. Social Studies 2 Units (Including American and World History) 

d. Science 2 Units (Including one laboratory course) 

e. Keyboarding 1 Unit (Including typing or computer literacy) 

f . Foreign Language 2 Units (Any single modern language) > 

g. Religion 2 Units 



12 



3. American College Test (ACT) or the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) results. 

Minimum ACT composite score of 1 6. 
Minimum SAT combined score of 840. 

4. Two character references, preferably sent from a principal, counselor, teacher, or pastor 
familiar with the student. Respondents should not be relatives. 

Tor deficiencies see the general education requirements 

Conditional Status* 



Conditions 



Requirements 



Student in high school who has completed at least A student must submit final official high school transcript before 
six semesters and has a cumulative GPA of at registering for classes, 

least 2.00 



Student who has not forwarded final official 
transcript 



Final official transcript must be received before registering for 
the following semester. 



Student who has not taken the ACT or SAT test 



The student must take the ACT before permission to register is 
granted by the Enrollment Management Office. The test is given 
on campus during freshman orientation; however, it is advisable 
for the student to take the test before arriving. 



Student with ACT/SAT results below the minimum Remedial course placement is required during the first semester 

of enrollment. 



Student with a high school GPA of 1 .70 to 1 .99 



Must submit an essay of 100 words or more explaining choice of 
major, career goals, past accomplishments, and academic 
difficulties encountered during academic career. 

Must register under the requirements for Academic Probation as 
listed in the bulletin 



Student with cumulative GPA below 1 .70 



Must submit an essay of 100 words or more explaining choice of 
major, career goals, past accomplishments, and academic 
difficulties encountered during academic career 

Must receive special approval from the vice president for 
Academic Affairs. 

Must register under the requirements for Academic Probation as 
listed in the bulletin 



*AII conditions must be removed by the end of the first semester. 

Special Conditions 

1 . Postbaccalaureate. A student with a bachelor's degree who is enrolled for part-time or 
full-time study. Applicant must complete an application and submit official transcripts. 



13 



2. Nondegree. A student who desires to take a course or courses but has no present plans 
to pursue a degree. Credit hours are limited to six hours per semester. Student can take 
up to a maximum of 24 hours as a nondegree student. Student must reapply for admission 
each semester. 

3. Transient. A student submitting evidence that he or she is in good and regular standing 
in an accredited college or university but who desires temporary admission to Oakwood 
College for one semester. Applicant must complete an application. All other processes are 
completed through the Records Office. 

4. Visiting student. Refer to the Cooperative Programs section in the bulletin for details. 

l-lome School Applicants 

Transcripts from home school graduates who have completed their academic courses through 
Griggs University or another regionally accredited program are accepted for regular admission. 

After Acceptance 

After acceptance students should immediately send in the room reservation/damage deposit, 
the housing application form, and the medical and dental forms. All new students are required to 
submit evidence of a recent physical examination along with current immunization history (must 
meet Alabama state requirements). 

Admission of International Applicants 

Acceptance deadline is 30 days prior to the beginning of the semester. 

Oakwood College is approved by the U.S. Office of Immigration and Naturalization Service for 
the admission of nonimmigrant students. Applicants should not leave their country with the inten- 
tion of enrolling at Oakwood College without a letter of acceptance and an 1-20 A-B Form from the 
Office of Enrollment Management. To be considered for admission, an international student must 
submit: 

1 . An application form completed, signed, and dated along with a $30.00 (U.S. currency) 
nonrefundable fee. 

2. Official/certified academic records of all secondary, preparatory, government exams and 
university courses as applicable. High school credentials will be evaluated according to 
the guidelines of the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Offic- 
ers. College transcripts may be required to be sent to the World Education Services for 
evaluation. All documents must be submitted in the original language together with an 
English translation if the original is not English. 

3. TOEFL paper-based scores/minimum of 500 and TSWE of 4.0 from non-English speak- 
ing countries. Minimum for computer-based exams is 1 73. 

4. Two character references, preferably sent from the principal, counselor, teacher, or a 
pastor familiar with the student. Respondents should not be relatives. 

5. ACT/SAT scores. (These must be submitted before permission to register is granted. The 
test is given on campus during freshmen orientation; however, it is advisable for the 
student to take the test before arriving if it is offered in their country.) 

To obtain the Form 1-20 A-B, the international student must submit an Affidavit of Support (the 
U.S. sponsor must submit Form 1-134), medical and dental forms, and an advance security de- 
posit of $1 ,000 in U.S. currency. The security deposit is refundable upon graduation or withdrawal 
from Oakwood College. It can only be used for an emergency, such as travel for death or sickness 



14 



of an immediate family member, and must be replaced before readmission the following semes- 
ter. 

After acceptance students should immediately send in the room reservation/damage deposit 
and the housing application form. 

Please note the following immigration regulations: 

Nonimmigrant students applying for admission to the United States for the first time after being 
issued an F-1 student's visa will not be admitted unless they intend to attend the school specified in 
that visa. Therefore, if before they depart for the United States students decide to attend another 
school, they should communicate with the issuing American consular office for the purpose of 
having the other school specified in the visa. Any other nonimmigrant students will not be admitted 
to the United States unless they intend to attend the school as specified in the Form 1-20 or Form 
1-94, which they present to the immigration officer at the port of entry. 

Nonimmigrant students who do not register at the school specified in their temporary entry 
permit (Form 1-94), or whose school attendance is terminated, or who register for less than a full 
course of study, or who accept unauthorized employment and fail to maintain their F-1 status must 
depart from the United States immediately. 

After Enrollment 

Services available to international (F-1 ) students include the following: 



Advisement in the areas of immigration regulations and documentation, financial concerns, 

health insurance, housing and residential life, employment, institutional policies, and matters 

of social and cultural adjustment. 

Orientation session for new international students on F-1 visas. 

Workshops, seminars, and campus programs to enhance student development, adjustment, 

and success. 



Admission of Veterans 

Oakwood College is approved as an institution qualified to offer education to veterans under 
the provisions of the Veterans Readjustment Act of 1966. Veterans who have completed high 
school or passed the GED are admitted under regular admissions standards for freshmen. Veter- 
ans transferring must meet the requirements for transfer students. 

Once enrolled, the veteran must present the Certificate of Eligibility for Educational Benefits to 
the coordinator of veterans affairs in the Records Office to ensure receipt of educational benefits. 

Physical education/activity credit and equivalent Oakwood College credit completed while in 
the armed services of the United States of America will be considered for those veterans who 
submit official documentation of military service and educational credit earned. Credit will be 
determined based on the recommendations in the Guide to the Evaluation of Educational Experi- 
ences in the Armed Services. 

Advanced Placement Program 

Credit toward graduation may be granted to an entering freshmen who has passed one or 
more Advanced Placement (AP) examinations with a score of 3, 4, or 5. The student is respon- 
sible for having the official test sent to the Records Office. A score of 3 will exempt the student 
from the first applicable course. A score of 4 or 5 will exempt the student from additional courses 
upon the recommendation of the department. 



15 



Advanced Level Examination 

The following credit toward graduation may be granted to a student who has passed an 
Advanced Level Examination (British): eight semester hours for each A, B, or C pass and four 
semester hours credit for each D or E pass. 

Admission of Transfer Students/Credits 

Students wishing to transfer to Oakwood College from another college or university must 
follow the same application procedure as other new students (see Admission Categories— Regular 
and Conditional). Transfer students must also submit official transcript from all schools attended. A 
high school transcript must also be submitted. A maximum of 64 semester hours may be accepted 
from a junior college. A student transferring work from another college will be given credit only for 
work completed with grades of C- or above, and only grades of C or higher are accepted in a 
student's major or minor field. 

The ACT or SAT requirement will be waived if the applicant has completed one quarter or 
semester each of college-level English and mathematics with a grade of C (2.00) or above. Other- 
wise, the ACT must be taken before being allowed to register. 

Students transferring from unaccredited colleges with a GPA of at least C may be accepted 
on a conditional basis. The previous credit will be validated only after the successful completion of 
a semester's work of at least 1 2 hours with a cumulative GPA of 2.00 at Oakwood College. 

Admission for Adult and Continuing Education (LEAP) 

Applicants are required to be at least 25 years of age and have two years of relevant work 
experience to be accepted into the program. To be considered for general admission into the 
college, the LEAP student must submit: 

1. Application for general admission to the college. 

2. Official college transcript from all schools attended. 

3. Official high school transcript. 

4. Letter of recommendation from employer or other representative knowledgeable of the 
applicant. 

For acceptance into the LEAP program, please complete the information packet distributed 
by the LEAP Office. 

Academic Scholarship Program 

Academic scholarships are available to entering freshmen whose GPA is 3.00 or higher. 
Other scholarships are available to valedictorians, salutatorians, national merit scholars/achievers, 
commended students, student body presidents, senior class presidents, yearbook editors, and 
school paper editors. All renewable scholarships are determined by the spring semester cumula- 
tive GPA and hours. Summer courses cannot be used for scolarship renewal purposes. 

Scholarships are also available to transfer students whose GPA is 3.25 and above. 

Returning students who have a spring semester cumulative GPA of 3.50 or above and are not 
receiving other academic awards can qualify for the Incentive Scholarship. Students must be 
enrolled a minimum of two semesters. This scholarship requires an application and is subject to 
the availability of funds. 

All academic awards are posted to the student's account after the last day to drop a course 
has occurred. For details regarding academic scholarships, see the Scholarship Handbook, 
provided by the Enrollment Management Office. 



16 



Financial Policies 

Schedule of Charges 
for 2001-2002 Academic Year 



Tuition Package Per Semester: Pacl<age Available to Resident and 
Nonresident Students Taking 12 to 16 hours per Semester 



Resident students 
Nonresident students 



$4,586 
$4,586 



Room and Meal Plans for Resident Students 



ROOM 

Wade Hall 

All other dorms with air-conditioning 

Cunningham Hall private rooms 



1,441 
1,185 
1,774 



MEAL PLANS 

Nineteen meals per week 
Fourteen meals per week 
Ten meals per week 



1,557 
1,466 
1,339 



HEALTH FEE 

Resident students 
Nonresident students 



Additional Fees 



28 
28 



GENERAL FEE 

Resident students 
Nonresident students 



96 
96 



Total Charges per Semester 

Resident students (standard room and 19-meal plan) 
Nonresident students 



7,452 
4,710 



Tuition Rates per Semester 



12-16 Hours 
8-11 Hours 
1-7 Hours 
Over 16 Hours 



$4,586 
$4,174 

$395/per hour 
$285/per additional hour 



Other Expenses 

Room reservation/damage deposit: $200 (one-time refundable fee of $150; dorm fee of $50) 

Books and supplies: $325 per semester (approximately) 

Health insurance: $1 89 per semester for U.S. citizens and $263 per semester for international 

students 



17 



Testing: $25.00 

Laboratory fees: $1 5-$60 per lab 

Late registration: $75 the first day and $1 5 additional charge each day up to a maximum of $1 35 

Drop/add: $10 up until last day for a refund 

Remittance 

Personal checks are not accepted. Please make all payments in the form of bank drafts, cashier's 
checks, certified personal checks, traveler's checks, money orders. Visa, or MasterCard. In- 
clude the student's Social Security number on all payments to ensure proper credit. 

Resident Students are required to pay a minimum of 70 percent of tuition and boarding costs at 
the time of registration: 

Tuition and Fees $4,710 (Based on 12-1 6 hours) 

Room and Board $2,742 

Totals $7,452X70% = $5,216 

Balance due in the following installments: 

Fall Semester % Amount 

September 30, 2001 10 $745 

October 30, 2001 10 $745 

November 30, 2001 10 $745 



Spring Semester 






January 30, 2002 


10 


$745 


February 28, 2002 


10 


$745 


March 30, 2002 


10 


$745 



Nonresident Students are required to pay a minimum of 70 percent of tuition and fees at the 
time of registration: 

Tuition and fees $4,710 X 70% = $3,297 

Balance due in the following installments: 

Fall Semester % Amount 

September 30, 2001 10 $471 

October 30, 2001 10 $471 

November 30,2001 10 $471 



Spring Semester 






January 30, 2002 


10 


$471 


February 28, 2002 


10 


$471 


March 30, 2002 


10 


$471 



18 



Refund and Repayment Policy 

The refund and repayment requirements apply when a student makes changes in course load, 
withdraws, drops out, takes an unapproved leave of absence, fails to return from an approved 
leave of absence, is expelled, or otherwise fails to complete the period of enrollment for which he 
or she was charged. 

The effective date for refunds of tuition or repayments are made according to the date the 
student notifies Oakwood College and completes the withdrawal form. If the student fails to offi- 
cially withdraw or appropriately notify Oakwood College, the last recorded date of class attended 
by the student, documented by Oakwood College, will be the effective date. 

Refund 

Institutional charges (tuition and fees, room and board on campus) are refunded appropri- 
ately as follows for drop/withdrawal: 



week 1 * 


100% 


week 2 


90% 


weeks 3 - 4 


75% 


weeks 5 - 6 


50% 


week 6+ 


0% 



less $100 down payment 



*First week being the first 4-day week of classes. 

Tuition and fees refunded for the summer term are as follows for drop/withdrawal: 



first 2 class days 
next 4 class days 
after 6 class days 



100% 

10% 

0% 



less $50 down payment 
less each day 



Repayment 

The repayment policy includes the following noninstitutional reasonable costs for a semester 
(15 weeks): 





Dependent 


Independent 


Housing** 


$1,575.00 


$1,912.50 


Food** 


1,358.50 


1 ,358.50 


Personal Items** 


535.50 


535.50 


Child Care** 




1 ,078.00 


Books 


500.00 


500.00 


Transportation 


621.50 


621.50 



**Repayment will be prorated on the percentage of the semester completed. 

The expense for books and supplies per semester is considered expended at the first day of 
classes. 

The transportation allowance per semester is expended the first day the student arrives on 
campus during the semester period. 



19 



A repayment of any unused portion of the above noninstitutional costs paid to the school via 
Title IV funds (excluding Stafford or Plus Loans and Federal Work Study) must be repaid to the 
college upon termination of enrollment. Examples of the appropriation of the refund policy are 
available upon request. 

Financial Assistance 

Scholarships are charged back at the same rate tuition is refunded. If the funds were paid by 
the Title IV Federal Financial Aid, the refunds are based on the U.S. Department of Education's 
Return of Title IV Funds Policy. 

As of August 23, 2000, students receiving Title IV financial aid who withdraw from Oakwood 
College will be subject to the new policy. This policy requires that when a recipient of Title IV grants 
or loan assistance withdraws from college during a semester, the institution must determine the 
amount of Title IV grant or loan assistance which the student earned as of the withdrawal date. The 
unearned portion must be returned to the Title IV programs in accordance with Federal Regula- 
tions. In certain instances, the student may also be required to return Title IV funds to the Depart- 
ment of Education in addition to that which the school is required to return. [CFR 668.22] 

Students receiving financial aid should consult with the Financial Aid Office concerning the 
possible effect of awards received caused by withdrawal or change in courseload. Any remaining 
balance on account must be paid at the time of withdrawal or dismissal. 

Department Course Fees 

Biological Sciences 

Bl 1 1 1-1 12 Human Anatomy and Physiology each $15.00 

Bl 131-132 General Biology each 15.00 

Bl 221 Microbiology 30.00 

Bl 225 Embryology 15.00 

BI230 PlantBiology 15.00 

Bl 241 General Microbiology 30.00 

BI316 Biology Instrumentation 15.00 

Bl 321 Genetics 15.00 

BI331 Histology 15.00 

Bl 380 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy 15.00 

Bl 422-423 General Physiology each 15.00 

Bl 425 General Ecology 15.00 

BI440 Parasitology 15.00 

Bl 451-452 Special Topics each 15.00 

Bl 455 Immunology 15.00 

BI460 Cellular and Molecular Biology 15.00 

Bl 471 Molecular Genetics 15.00 

Bl 480 Mammalian Anatomy 30.00 

Bl 484 Mycology 15.00 

Business and Information Systems* 

AS 120 Keyboarding $30.00 

IS 100 Computer Application 30.00 

IS 211 Fund, of Systems Dev 15.00 

IS 231 Information Systems 15.00 



20 



IS 270 
IS 335 



Files and Large Systems 

Database Design and Implementation. 



15.00 
15.00 



*AII majors in the department will be charged $45.00 each semester of their junior and senior 
years and not the course fee. 



Chemistry 

CH 101 Introduction to Inorganic Chemistry 

CH 102 Introduction to Organic Chemistry 

CH 141-142 General Chemistry each 

CH201 Qualitative Analysis 

CH211 Analytical Chemistry 

CH 31 1 L-312L Lab for Organic Chemistry each 

CH341L-342L Lab for Physical Chemistry each 

CH401L-402L Lab for Biochemistry each 

CH 410 Applied Chemistry 

CH411 Instrumental Methods 

CH 490-491 Research and Independent Study each 

English and Communications 

AR 101-102 Basic Design each 

AR 111 Fundamentals of Drawing 

AR 121 Fundamentals of Painting 

AR 141 Fundamentals of Photography 

AR261 Sculpture 

AR311-312 Advanced Drawing each 

AR 321-322 Advanced Painting each 

AR 341-342 Advanced Photography each 

AR374 Studio Photography 

CO 342 Radio and TV Announcing 

CO 343 Fundamentals of Audio Production 

CO 346-347 Fundamentalsof TV Production each 

CO 401-402 Practicum in Communications each 

Family and Consumer Sciences 

FS 111 Food Preparation 

FS 151 Fashion Sewing Selection 

FS 152 Fashion Sewing Textiles 

FS 201 Art in Life 

FS231 Developing Creativity 

FS 301 Experimental Foods 

FS 321 Advanced Nutrition 

FS 351 Tailoring 

FS 360 Vegetarian Cuisine 

FS 401 Dress Design 

FS441 Home Management 



$15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 



$15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 



$15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 



\ 



21 



Mathematics and Computer Science 

CM210 Computer Science with C++ $15.00 

CM 220 Computer Sci. Data Structures with C++ 15.00 

CM 340 Computer Logic Design 15.00 

CM 350 Introductory Computer Architect 15.00 

CM 352-353 Operating Systems each 15.00 

CM 367 Programming Languages 15.00 

CM381 Computer Networl<s 15.00 

CM 480 Selected Topics Computers 15.00 

CM 490-491 Research and Independent Study each 15.00 

l\/lusic 

MU 101 Class Piano $15.00 

MU102 Class Voice 15.00 

MU103 Class Instrument 15.00 

MU 161-164 Piano Proficiency Class each 15.00 

All the following individual instruction courses are $200 per hour for nonmusic majors and 
$130 for music majors ($65 per hour after two hours): MU 100, MU 165-166, MU 265-266, MU 
300, MU 365-366, MU 465-466, and MU 499. 

Nursing 

NU101 Fundamentals Nursing Concepts $15.00 

NU102 AdultHealthI 15.00 

NU201 The Childbearing Family 15.00 

NU202 The Childrearing Family 15.00 

NU203 Mental Health Nursing 15.00 

NU204 AdultHealthll . 15.00 

NU330 Pathophysiology for Nurses 15.00 

NU341 Health Assessment 15.00 

NU411 Community Health Nursing 15.00 

NU415 Advanced Clinical Nursing 15.00 

Physical Education 

PE205 First Aid and CPR $15.00 

PE 222, 247 Racquetball each 15.00 

PE 245, 249 Tennis each 15.00 

PE260 Golf 15.00 



22 



Financial Aid 

Students applying for the Federal Student Financial Assistance Program (known as Title IV) 
must comply with the following procedures in a timely manner. A student's noncompliance may 
result in the loss of potential benefits and will result in a protracted and negative institutional 
registration experience if the student needs the federal resources to assist in his or her educa- 
tional expenses. 

The following procedures are strongly advised: 

1 . Complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). After the FAFSA has been 
processed, a Student Aid Report (SAR) will be mailed to you. Once you receive your SAR, 
check it for accuracy of information. The Financial Aid Office (FAO) will electronically re- 
trieve it; however, Oakwood College must be listed as one of the schools of attendance in 
order for us to retrieve it. 

2. If the SAR states that it has been selected for review in a process called verification, you must 
submit the college's Verification Worksheet (available from the FAO or the Internet) and the 
following documents: 

a. A signed copy of the base year federal income tax return to the FAO. Base year is 
the year that precedes the academic year for which aid is being applied. For ex- 
ample, applicants for the 1 999-2000 academic year would submit their 1 998 federal 
income tax return. If the student did not and will not file a tax return, then he/she must 
submit the appropriate copies of his/her W-2's. 

b. Legal or biological parents of dependent students must submit a signed copy of their 
complete base year federal income tax return(s) to the FAO. If the parent(s) did not 
and will not file a base year tax return, then they must submit copies of their W-2's. 

c. The student, spouse, or parent must submit official documents that substantiate the 
annual amounts of untaxed income for the base year. Untaxed income may include 
Social Security benefits, pension benefits, workmen's compensation, or parsonage 
allowance. If the documentation is not an official/regulatory form with appropriate 
signatures, it will not be accepted by the FAO. 

3. Students applying for the Federal Stafford Loan or the Parent Loan for Undergraduate Stu- 
dents (PLUS) must submit a signed loan application to the FAO. 

4. Students applying for scholarships through Oakwood College must submit all required docu- 
mentation by the specified deadline dates. 

5. An entrance interview session must be attended by all first-time loan borrowers before loan 
proceeds can be applied to the student's account. 

Financial Aid Policies 

Satisfactory Academic Progress for Semesters, Terms (LEAP and Certificate Programs), 
and Sessions (Summer). 

Federal regulations require the college to establish reasonable standards for measuring aca- 
demic progress. The college must monitor participants in student financial assistance programs to 
ensure that those academic standards are met, and that students make real progress toward 
competing their degrees. The policy must contain a qualitative component, a quantitative compo- 
nent, and an overall time-frame component. A student must maintain satisfactory academic progress 
regardless of whether the student was a previous recipient of financial aid or not. 



23 



Qualitative Component The college's current academic standards are the qualitative stan- 
dards for this policy. This policy articulation also recognizes the cumulative grade point average 
as the sole numeric measure. This change effectively terminates use of the unadjusted grade 
point average in academic decisions. Federal regulations specifically require students who have 
earned sixty-one or more hours Quniors and seniors) to maintain the minimum cumulative grade 
point average required by the college for graduation. This component will be evaluated before the 
fall semester. Those minimum standards are outlined in the Oakwood College Bulletin as follows: 



Hours Completed 


Required GPA 


0-29 


1.70 


30 - 60 


2.00 


61 - 92 


2.00 


93-128 


2.00 



Quantitative Component Once at least 24 semester hours have been attempted, a student's 
cumulative hours passed must be at least 75 percent of the cumulative hours attempted. For 
example, a student enrolling in 1 2 hours per term for two semesters would be required to pass 1 8 
of those hours to retain financial aid benefits. A student enrolling in six hours per term for four 
semesters would also be required to pass at least 1 8 hours. The successful pass rate increases to 
80 percent once the student attempts 61 or more hours. This component will be evaluated at the 
time of each application. 

Overall Time Frame: Students are no longer eligible to receive Title IV federal financial assis- 
tance after attempting the lesser of 150 percent of the published academic program hours, or 15 
full-time equivalent semesters. A full-time equivalent semester is deemed to contain a minimum of 
12 hours. For instance, if the published length of an academic program is 120 hours, the maxi- 
mum time frame established by the college must not exceed 180 attempted credit hours (that is, 
120x1.5). 

Transfer, Summer, Consortium, and Transient Hours: Students transferring to the college are 
assumed to be maintaining reasonable academic progress. All hours transferred from prior or 
concurrent attendance at other schools will be considered in establishing the class standing for 
grade requirements, and are integral in determining the overall time frame allowed for financial aid 
eligibility. The GPA from other colleges will not factor into the cumulative GPA at Oakwood College. 

Grades: Courses with nonassigned grades, including withdrawals, are considered in determina- 
tion of the percentage of hours completed toward the degree. Refer to the College Bulletin for the 
regulations concerning the effect on cumulative hours attempted. Acceptable grades are A, B, C, 
D, and P. Unacceptable grades are: F I, W, NC, FA, AU, DG, and U. All of these grades are 
considered in evaluating the qualitative, quantitative, and overall time-frame components. 

Second Baclielor's Degree/Dual Degree: Students seeking a second undergraduate or dual 
degree will be permitted to enroll in up to six full-time equivalent semesters beyond the first bachelor's 
or dual major. This requirement is based on completion of program requirements, and not neces- 
sarily actual graduation. Students seeking a second degree are not Pell eligible. 

Loss of Aid Eligibility: According to federal regulations, a student is not allowed to receive further 
aid from Title IV student financial assistance if he or she does not meet the college's standards of 
satisfactory progress. Additionally, certain state and institutional scholarships may be rescinded 
as a result of failure to make reasonable progress. Certain scholarships awarded by the Office of 
Enrollment Management will be forfeited immediately when the grade point average falls below a 



24 



prescribed minimum, which may be stricter than the minimums cited for federal purposes. Stu- 
dents who become ineligible to receive further federal aid will be notified at the address listed on 
the most recent Student Aid Report (SAR) obtained by the Office of Financial Aid, or a more 
recent one, if provided by the student prior to the last day of the semester. Students receive first 
notice of grades and are held responsible to regularly monitor their cumulative grade point aver- 
age. All other notices are a courtesy of the college. 

Appeals: The following procedure has been established for those who lose federal Title IV finan- 
cial assistance eligibility due to failure to maintain satisfactory academic progress. The proce- 
dure must be followed precisely and without exception. Failure to adhere to the procedure may 
result in the right to a hearing, or an automatic denial on the merits. NO PERSONAL APPEAR- 
ANCES WILL BE GRANTED before the Financial Aid Appeals Committee. (Note: No appeal 
authority has been established for certain scholarships from the Office of Enrollment Management 
or from the State of Alabama for the Alabama State Grant.) 

Procedures: 

1 . You must submit an application for appeal and an accompanying letter indicating the 
reason(s) why you failed to complete the necessary hours or attain the required GPA 
during the prior academic period. You must submit any legitimate documentation that 
supports your claim or rationale. Furthermore, you MUST outline the steps taken to 
correct your lack of academic performance. The general deadline for submitting the 
appeal is June 30, unless modified by the vice president for Academic Affairs. All appeals 
must be submitted to Academic Affairs. 

2. Appeal hearings will be announced on the annual calendar distributed by the Office of 
Financial Aid. No other hearings will be scheduled, except as determined by the discre- 
tion of the vice president for Academic Affairs. 

3. The appeal application will be reviewed and a decision made within 72 hours of the 
scheduled hearing. Decisions and related provisions will be announced in writing by the 
assistant vice president for Academic Affairs. Decisions of the Financial Aid Committee 
are final. The decision may be: 

a. Acceptance of your appeal without any penalty 

b. Acceptance of your appeal provisionally, with a probation period during which 
you will be required to pass a specified number of hours or attain the required 
GPA 

c. Denial of your appeal 

Reinstatement: Students who lose eligibility forTitle IV financial assistance because of failure to 
maintain reasonable progress toward a degree may reapply. No reapplication will be considered 
until the student clears the deficiency or attains the minimum grade point average. 

Students who lose financial aid eligibility because of failure to maintain satisfactory progress 
toward a degree may reapply for financial aid after clearing the deficiency; no aid will be granted 
retroactively. 

Verification of Enrollment 

Students who require enrollment verification for student loan deferment purposes must bring 
the form or a written request to the Records Office. When a student is enrolled full-time, freshman 
and senior verification will be for one year, junior for two years, and sophomore for three years. 



25 



Transfer Students Eligibility for Aid 

Transfer students are eligible for federal aid during their first semester of attendance at the 
college. Refer to the Satisfactory Academic Progress brochure obtainable from the Office of 
Financial Aid or the Enrollment Management Office. 

Remedial Course Work 

If a student is enrolled solely in a remedial program, the student is not eligible for federal aid. 
A student may receive federal aid for a limited amount of noncredit or reduced credit remedial 
course work that is included as part of a regular program. Once the student has enrolled for re- 
medial courses, his/her aid may be adjusted accordingly. 

Available Funds 

Federal Pell Grant: A nonrepayable, federally funded grant program for undergraduate stu- 
dents only. Pell Grant awards vary in amount each year and are based on financial need and 
hours of enrollment. 

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG): A nonrepayable, feder- 
ally funded and university-based grant program. Awards are made to early applicants who dem- 
onstrate the most financial need. 

Alabama Student Assistance Program (ASAP): State funded grants in varying amounts 
available to Alabama residents who demonstrate financial need. 

Federal Subsidized Stafford Loans: Subsidized loans, which means the federal govern- 
ment will pay the interest on the loan while the student is in school and during specified defer- 
ments. The student must demonstrate financial need to receive this loan. 

Federal Unsubsidized Stafford Loans: Loans that students may borrow regardless of need 
but will have to pay all interest charges. 

Federal PLUS Loans: Loans that parents of dependent students may obtain to pay for the 
students' education.* 

Entrance/Exit Interview 

First-time borrowers at Oakwood College must attend an entrance interview before receiving 
any loan proceeds. This federally mandated requirement is to ensure that the students have 
received loan counseling and understand their responsibilities as borrowers. An exit interview is 
required of all students who have received loan proceeds during their matriculation at Oakwood 
and is conducted prior to graduation or terminating enrollment. 



Loan Limits 










Dependent 


Subsidized 


Independent 


Subsidized 


Unsubsidized 


1st year 


$2625 


1 St year 


$2625 


$4000 


2nd year 


$3500 


2nd year 


$3500 


$4000 


3rd year 


$5500 


3rd year 


$5500 


$5000 


4th year 


$5500 


4th year 


$5500 


$5000 



*For dependent students whose parents cannot borrow under the PLUS program, the amount 
a student can borrow under the unsubsidized program is the same as for independent students. 



26 



Who May Apply for Financial Aid 

To receive aid from the student aid programs you must: 



Have financial need. 

Have a liigh school diploma or a General Education Development (GED) certificate, pass a 
test approved by the U.S. Department of Education, or meet other standards your state estab- 
lishes that are approved by the U.S. Department of Education. 

Be enrolled or accepted for enrollment as a regular student working toward a degree or 
certificate in an eligible program. (You may not receive aid for correspondence or telecom- 
munications courses unless they are part of an associate or bachelor's degree program.) 
Be a U.S. citizen or eligible noncitizen. 
Have a valid Social Security number. 
Make satisfactory academic progress. 

Sign a statement of educational purpose and a certificate statement of overpayment and 
default (both found on the Free Application for Federal Student Aid [FAFSA]). 
Register with Selective Service, if required. 



27 



student Life and Services 

Spiritual 

At Oakwood College, religion is the main foundation. The college church service, the Sabbath 
School, the Adventist Youth Society (AYS), the Ministerial Forum, the student literature evangelism 
program, the residence hall worships, and the many USM religious programs afford the students 
excellent opportunities for the development of character, self-expression, leadership, and initiative. 
For more information, contact the Office of Spiritual Life. 

Convocations, the Arts and Lecture Series 

During the school year distinguished guest speakers address the student body at the weekly 
assemblies/chapels. In the fall and spring semesters, they also conduct weeks of religious em- 
phasis. The Arts and Lectures Series brings to the campus each year several outstanding lectur- 
ers and artists. In addition to these, many other programs of significance are sponsored by the 
college. It is expected that all students will attend the weekly assemblies, the Arts and Lectures 
programs, and special convocations. 

Social Activities 

A wholesome program of social activities is planned by the director of student activities in 
consultation with the United Student Movement. Social programs are sponsored during the year 
by various clubs, classes, and organizations. 

Extracurricular Activities Participation 

The recreational activities of the college are designed to serve the wide variety of leisure-time 
interests of the students. In order to ensure satisfactory scholarship, the extent to which students 
may participate in extracurricular activities is subject to regulation. Students holding office in any 
organization must have a cumulative GRA of 2.5 or better. Members on academic probation may 
be limited in the degree to which they may participate in the activities of their organizations. 

Intramural Sports 

The college sponsors a program of intramural sports in connection with physical education 
activities. 

Health Services 

Health Services is open Monday through Thursday, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., and Friday, 8:00 
a.m. to 1 1 :00 a.m., to meet the basic health needs of the campus community. The Health Services 
Office is staffed by licensed registered nurses. Physicians may be seen during posted hours. 
When Health Services is closed, all medical needs and emergencies may be handled by any of 
the hospital emergency rooms and/or outpatient clinics in the surrounding area. A $28.00 per 
semester health fee is charged to each student, which covers services received in Health Ser- 
vices. Laboratory fees and transportation costs to off-campus medical facilities are the responsi- 
bility of the student. 

The health of each student is important. To assist Health Services in providing the care needed, 
a medical history, which includes laboratory testing, a physical examination within the last 12 
months, and a TB test within the last 1 2 months, is required. A record of immunizations is required 
by Oakwood College and the state of Alabama. This record includes documentation of polio. 



28 



^ 



tetanus, diptheria, measles, mumps, rubella and hepatitis B. All students born after January 
1957 must show proof of two doses of live vaccine measles. Be sure this information arrives 
before registration. 

All students entering Oakwood College must have medical insurance coverage. Insurance for 
students without medical coverage may be acquired through the school. The cost for the year is 
divided into two premiums, August and January. Students are enrolled in the insurance plan at 
registration. The fee is part of the student's bill each semester. If a student wishes to use his/ 
her own personal medical coverage, this must be indicated on the insurance waiver card 
each semester during registration. A card or copy of membership is to be carried by each 
student in case of an emergency. All international students must present evidence of medi- 
cal coverage in the U.S. 

Student Association 

The United Student Movement (USM) of Oakwood College is the major student organization of 
the college. This organization seeks to promote a more perfect relationship among all sectors of 
the college community; to enhance the religious, academic, cultural, and social programs of the 
college; and to emphatically support the aims and objectives of Oakwood College. Each martriculated 
regular student of Oakwood College is a member of the United Student Movement. The United 
Student Movement finances its own programs through payment of individual membership dues. 
With the help and approval of faculty sponsors, the United Student Movement carries out such 
programs along with the Department of Student Activities: 

Class Organizations 



Freshman Class 
Sophomore Class 



Junior Class 
Senior Class 



Residence Clubs 

Carter Hall Residence Club (Delta Sigma Phi) 
Edwards Hall Residence Club 
Married Students' Club 
Peterson Hall Residence Club 
Wade Hall Residence Club 

Membership in the departmental clubs is based on academic performance and is considered 
a distinct honor. Students must have a GPA of 2.00 to participate in club activities and a GPA of 
2.50 to hold office. No Greek social clubs are allowed to organize or function on campus. 

Governing Standards 

Oakwood College, a Seventh-day Adventist institution of higher education, is committed to 
providing quality education in the context of the Adventist faith. Modeled after the school of the 
prophets in the Bible, it integrates faith and learning in a modern-day setting. It offers its students 
the opportunity to acquire knowledge, behaviors, skills, and wholesome attitudes. Such develop- 
ment will equip them to provide the highest service in this life and in the life to come. The driving 
principles of Oakwood College are "Education, Excellence, Eternity." 

Oakwood College is committed to achieving a high level of spiritual development and academic 
excellence. Its teaching and practicing morals, values, and standards will result in a distinctive 
outcome-the Oakwood man and the Oakwood woman. Therefore, the students of Oakwood Col- 
lege are expected to exhibit high degrees of honor, integrity, and morality. 



29 



It is also expected that the Oakwood student will deal with others with compassion and sen- 
sitivity. In light of this, the College provides the context for the Oakwood man and the Oakwood 
Woman to develop in their use of judgment, in personal maturation, and in their spiritual journey. 
Any student desiring counsel and/or additional information concerning the Code of Student Con- 
duct may contact the Chaplain, Residence Hall Deans, or the Office of the Vice President for 
Student Services. 

Student Handbook 

In every community there are laws. It is the responsibility of every student to secure the 
Student Handbook irorr\ the Office of Student Services and read the rules and regulations govern- 
ing student life at Oakwood College, preferably before registration. Familiarity with and accep- 
tance of the requirements set forth in this book will make life at Oakwood College more interesting 
and certainly more enjoyable. 

A student's standing in a Christian school is based not alone on his/her scholarship attainment 
but also upon his/her general conduct and attitude toward the community in which he/she lives. As 
a citizen of the college community the student must realize that he or she has been admitted to a 
privileged group and that he or she has no right to work against that group. Any student who 
violates the rules of the college may be asked to withdraw. 

Student Citizenship 

Each individual coming to Oakwood College for the purpose of entering any department of the 
college is subject to supervision and jurisdiction from the time of arrival in Huntsville until his/her 
connection is terminated by graduation or by any officially approved withdrawal. The record of 
each student is reviewed periodically, and his or her continuation at the college is based upon his/ 
her attitudes and general conduct, as well as scholastic attainment. 

Listed among the governing policies of the college are infractions which are considered cause 
for suspension and may be cause for dismissal or serious disciplinary action for the first offense. 
Since no student who makes a habit of indulging in any of these practices would knowingly be 
accepted at Oakwood College the first infraction may result in dismissal from school. 

A student whose progress or conduct is unsatisfactory or whose influence is detrimental may 
be asked to withdraw at any time. 

Any student dismissed from school withdraws immediately from the campus and may be 
subjected to charges of trespassing should he or she return without permission from the adminis- 
tration. A student suspended for disciplinary reasons will not be allowed to make up class work 
assigned and done during his/her absence. Missed work will incur a grade of "F" and will be 
computed in the student's final grade. 

Leave of Absence 

Permission for an overnight or weekend leave of absence from the campus may be obtained 
from the appropriate residence dean. Approval must also be obtained from the work supervisor 
and, when classes are missed, from the vice president for Academic Affairs. For traveling, written 
permission from the parent or guardian must be on file for every student who is not of legal age (1 9 
years of age in Alabama). 



30 



Attendance at Religious Services 

Oakwood College is emphatically a Christian college. Attendance at worships, Friday evening 
vespers, and Sabbath services is expected of all students residing on cannpus. 

Assembly Absences 

All registered students are required to attend weekly assemblies. Two unexcused absences 
each semester are allowed without penalty. Excuses for absences from assembly must be submit- 
ted in writing to the vice president for Student Services before the very next assembly. Failure to 
do this will automatically result in an unexcused absence. Three unexcused absences are allowed 
each semester. The fourth and fifth unexcused absences will result in a $10.00 fine per absence. 
All unexcused absences beyond the fifth absence {third absence for those currently in noncom- 
pliance discipline status) will result in a $25.00 fine per absence and subject the student to 
discipline under noncompliance status. 

Use of Vehicles 

Since the ownership and use of an automobile frequently militate against success in college, 
students are not encouraged to bring automobiles with them unless absolutely necessary. Fresh- 
men are not permitted to bring automobiles to the college or the vicinity, or to operate automobiles 
owned by other individuals. 

All students, whether living in the residence halls or in the community, who own or operate any 
type of motor vehicle (e.g., car, motorcycle, scooter) must register it with the Office of Security at 
the time of registration for the fall semester, or within 24 hours of his/her arrival should arrival be 
after registration has been concluded, or within 24 hours of its procurement within any semester 
of the school year. 

Owners must have a valid operator's license and must show proof of liability insurance (in- 
cluding medical coverage) at the time of registration and whenever requested by traffic enforce- 
ment personnel. 

Residence Halls 

Oakwood College is a boarding institution. As such, all students are required to live on 
campus in one of the residence halls and participate in one of the three meal programs. Students 
who wish to live off campus must meet one of the following criteria: 

They live in the community with their parents, adult members of their immediate family 
who are beyond college age, or with a close relative (aunt, uncle, grandparent). 
They are married. 

They are at least 21 years of age or have had two years of military service and are not on 
social, citizenship, or academic probation. 

Apartments 

The college owns 30 units of one- and two-bedroom apartments which are available to married 
students. These apartments rent for reasonable amounts. There are also approved apartments in 
the community, furnished and unfurnished, in which married students may live. For information, 
write the assistant vice president for Finance. 



31 



The Counseling Center 

A comprehensive program of guidance and counseling services is made available to students. 

Services 

Services include testing (diagnostic assessment, national placement examinations, CLEP), 
counseling (personal, career, premarital, marriage and family), and developmental guidance (ca- 
reer evaluation, human relations, leadership training, and family life education). 

Goals and Philosophy 

The center's emphasis is on personal development. Its primary goal is to help students 
become more effective in handling and resolving problem situations before they become more 
critical by teaching them what to expect and how to behave adaptively under most circumstances. 
It is a preventive philosophy which is believed to be most suitable to the needs, beliefs, and 
practices of Seventh-day Adventists and other fundamentally conservative Christians. 

The goal for its consulting activities is to facilitate the continuing development and mainte- 
nance of an optimal collegiate environment for learning and individual growth. 

Confidentiality 

Personal information regarding specific individuals is held in strictest confidence and may not 
be released without written consent of the persons involved. 

Cost 

Professional services to students are given without charge. There are, however, charges 
associated with the computer scoring and analysis of diagnostic tests and the administration of the 
national placement examinations and CLEP. 



Work Education/Career Services 

The Office of Work Education/Career Services offers a comprehensive program that assists 
students in developing work skills and ethics as well as providing financial assistance for educa- 
tional costs. In addition, it assists students and alumni from all academic areas in attaining their 
career objectives. Job opportunities are available in most areas on campus. You should contact 
the Office of Work Education for additional information. 

Permission to begin working is given only to students who are registered and have produced 
the documents to prove employment eligibility. 

Federal regulations require that all employees hired present original documents that establish 
both their identity and eligibility to work. All students wishing to work will be required to present 
proper documents before they will be authorized to begin work. 



32 



Prospective employees must present either one Item from list A or one item from each of lists 
B and C. 

List A United States passport 

Certificate of United States citizenship 

Certificate of Naturalization 

Unexpired foreign passport with attached employment authorization or student visa 

List B A state-issued driver's license or ID card with a photograph or information including 
name, sex, date of birth, height, weight, and color of eyes 
U.S. military card 

List C Original Social Security card (other than a card stating it is not valid for employment) 
A birth certificate issued by state, country, or municipal authority bearing a seal or 
other certification 
Unexpired INS Employment Authorization 

Career Services seeks to provide career opportunities for students and alumni through pro- 
grams which will enhance their professional competencies and increase their marketability. Sev- 
eral services and programs are available to students during the school year, including assistance 
with resume writing, career placement, and the Youth Motivational Task Force program. 

Information on these and other assistance programs is available through the Office of Work 
Education/Career Services. 



33 



Academic Policies 



Curriculum 



The curriculum at Oakwood College reflects very distinctly the educational philosophy, 
purposes, and needs of the Seventh-day Adventist Church. From its earliest history, Seventh-day 
Adventist education has been multipurpose — a combination of theory and practice. Strong em- 
phasis has been given to providing students with a college program that would grant them job entry 
and provide opportunities for the development of a personal code of moral and social values for 
Christian living in contemporary society. It is for this reason that the curricular offerings at 
Oakwood College have a very pragmatic character. This is true in the humanities, social sci- 
ences, applied sciences, and natural sciences. Because of the needs of the Seventh-day Adven- 
tist Church, as well as society at large, Oakwood College has developed some disciplines that are 
almost exclusively professional. However, regardless of the amount of vocational emphasis, all 
baccalaureate and associate degree programs have been so organized that there is a common 
core of general education studies required of all students. 

The mission of the college strongly emphasizes health, the importance of service to the 
world, the integration of spiritual instruction and understanding as a part of intellectual growth, and 
the facilitation of cultural and personal affirmation. The general education core curriculum in- 
cludes courses in the philosophy of Christian education, basic computer literacy, health and 
recreation, the humanities, foreign languages, mathematics, natural sciences, religion and theol- 
ogy, and social sciences. Baccalaureate and associate degree programs also are designed to 
harmonize with the key elements of the college's mission. 

The college has fourteen academic departments offering the following degrees: Associate 
of Arts, Associate of Science, Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Business Administration, Bachelor of 
Science, Bachelor of Social Work, and Bachelor of Vocal Performance, and about forty-five 
majors and thirty minors. 



Department 


Degree 


Major 


Minor 


Biological Sciences 


B.S. 


Biology 


Biology 




B.S. 


Biology Education 






B.S. 


Natural Sciences 




Business and 


A.S., B.S. 


Accounting 


Accounting 


Information 


B.B.A. 


Business Administration 


Management 


Systems 


B.S. 


Business Education 






A.S., B.S. 


Computer Info. Systems 


Computer Info. Sys. 




B.S. 


Finance 


Finance 




B.S. 


Organizational Mgmt. 




Chemistry 


B.S. 


Biochemistry 






B.A., B.S. 


Chemistry 


Chemistry 




B.S. 


Chemistry Education 






B.S. 


Cytotechnology 






B.S. 


Medical Technology 






A.S. 


Pre-Occupational Then 






A.S. 


Pre-Physical Therapy 






A.S. 


Pre-Physican Assistant 






A.S. 


Pre-Speech Pathology 





35 






Department 


Degree 


Major 


Minor 


Education 


B.S. 


Elementary Education 




English and 
Communications 


A.S. 
B.A. 
B.A. 
B.S. 
B.A. 
B.A. 


Art 

Communications 

English 

English Language Arts Ed. 

French 

Spanish 


Art 

Communications 

English 

French 
Spanish 


Family and 
Consumer 
Sciences 


B.S. 
B.S. 
B.S. 
B.S. 


Dietetics 

Family/Consumer Sc. 
Family/Consum. Sc. Ed. 
Human Dev./Family Stud. 


Food and Nutrition 
Family/Consum.Sc. 
Child Development 
Apparel and Design 


Health and 
Physical Education 


B.S. 

B.A., B.S. 
B.S. 


Fitness and Wellness 
Health/Physical Education 
Physical Ed. Teaching 


Physical Education 


History 


B.A. 
B.A. 
B.S. 


History 

International Studies 
Social Science Ed. 


History 

African Amer. Stud. 

Political Science 


Mathematics and 
Computer Science 


B.S. 
B.S. 
B.A. 
B.A. 
B.S. 


Applied Mathematics 
Computer Science 
Math/Computer Science 
Mathematics 
Mathematics Education 


Mathematics 
Computer Science 
Physics 


Music 


B.A. 
B.S. 
B.S. 
B.M. 
B.M. 


Music Music 

Music Business 

Music Education 

Theory and Composition 

Vocal Performance and Pedagogy 


Nursing 


B.S. 


Nursing 




Psychology 


B.A., B.S. 


Psychology 


Psychology 
Correctional Sci. 
Sociology 


Religion and 
Theology 


A.A. 
B.A. 
B.A. 
B.S. 


Bible Worker Instructorship 

Ministerial Theology 

Religion 

Religious Education 


Biblical Interpret. 
Biblical Languages 
Ministerial Theology 
Religon 


Social Work 


B.S.W. 


Social Work 








The Academic Year 

The academic or college year usually starts in late August and ends in July. It consists of two 
semesters, each of which covers a period of approximately fifteen weeks. Provision may be made 
for mini sessions during the summer and winter breaks. 

Schedule of Classes 

Each year the College publishes a schedule of classes which lists the courses offered, the 
time of meetings, the rooms, and the instructors. The College reserves the right to cancel any 
course offered for which there are less than six students and to set limits on class size when 
necessary. 

Course Numbers and Symbols 

Courses of instruction are classified as remedial, lower division, and upper division. Remedial 
courses, numbered 090 through 099 (not counted for graduation credits), are courses which may 
be required of certain students. Lower division courses are numbered 100 through 299; upper 
division courses are numbered 300 through 499. Students should take each level in turn to avoid 
scheduling problems. Courses with (W) are designated writing courses. Code to course abbre- 
viations are: 



AC Accounting 


GE 


Geography 


AH Allied Health 


HC 


Health Care Administration 


AR Art 


HI 


History 


AS Admin. Systems Mgmt. 


IS 


Computer Information Systems 


BA Management 


MA 


Mathematics 


BL Biblical Languages 


MU 


Music 


CH Chemistry 


NU 


Nursing 


CM Computer Science 


OM 


Organizational Management 


CO Communications 


PH 


Physics 


EC Economics 


PE 


Physical Education 


ED Education 


PS 


Political Science 


EG Engineering 


PY 


Psychology 


EN English 


RE 


Religion and Theology 


FN Finance 


SO 


Sociology 


FR French 


SP 


Spanish 


FS Family and Consumer Sciences 


SW 


Social Work 



Credit 



The unit of credit is the semester hour. A semester hour is the amount of credit earned for the 
satisfactory completion of one hour a week lecture or recitation or at least two hours a week 
laboratory practice throughout one semester. 

Hyphenated courses (e.g., 1 01 -1 02) indicate that the sequence of courses should be taken in 
order. Commas separating courses (e.g., 101,1 02) indicate that the courses may be taken out of 
sequence. The designation 3-3 indicates that the course carries three semester hours of credit 
each semester for two semesters, which, being hyphenated, should be taken in sequence. 



study Load 

Class load is governed by classification and previous academic perfornnance as follows: 



Classification 


Minimum Cum. GPA 


l\/laximum Load 


Academic probation 


below 2.00 


13 hours 


All regular students 


2.00 


17 hours 


Sophomores and juniors 


3.00 


18 hours 


Seniors 


3.00 


20 hours 



The maximum class load for any situation includes incompletes and courses by cooperative 
arrangement (neighboring colleges). 

A class load of 12 credit hours is considered full-time and will satisfy the following authorities: 

1 . Immigration and Naturalization Service 

2. Selective Service 

3. Veterans Administration 

4. Health, Education, and Welfare 

5. U.S. Department of Labor 

Classification of Students 

New students are classified upon acceptance by the Office of Enrollment Management. Re- 
turning students' classification for the year is determined by the amount of credit they have earned 
at the beginning of the college year. A student who may meet the hour requirement, but whose 
cumulative grade point average is below 2.00, will be listed in the next lower class until the cumula- 
tive grade point average is raised to 2.00 or better. Student classes are organized early in the fall 
semester according to the following levels of academic achievement (remedial courses are not 
included). 



Classification 


Minimum Cum 


GPA 


Number of Semester Hours 


Freshman 


1.70 




0-29 


Sophomore 


2.00 




30-60 


Junior 


2.00 




61 -92 


Senior 


2.00 




93-128 


Special Students 









Special students accepted to the college fall under the following categories: 

1 . Postbaccalaureate refers to a student with a bachelor's degree who is enrolled for part- 
time or full-time work. 

2. Unclassified applies to any student who meets admission standards but who has no present 
plans to pursue a degree or to a student whose classification cannot be determined at the 
time of admission. 

3. Nondegree refers to a student enrolled in the traditional college courses and who desires 
to take a course or courses for personal development. Courses are limited to three 
semester hours or one course per semester. 

4. Transient admission applies to a student submitting evidence that he or she is in good and 
regular standing in an accredited college or university but who desires temporary admis- 
sion to Oakwood College for one semester, the grades and credits of which will be trans- 
ferred to his or her original institution. 

5. Visiting student (refer to the Cooperative Programs section in this bulletin for details). 



Class Standing 

Freshmen are limited to lower division courses except by permission of the head of the 
department in which the course is being taught. The lower division courses are open to freshmen 
and sophomores and should be completed before the student progresses to the junior and senior 
years. 

A student entering the third year of college work who lacks any of the prescribed courses of 
the lower division must first register for such prescribed courses of the lower division and then 
complete the program from the upper division. 

Beginning freshmen on academic probation will not be allowed to advance to regular aca- 
demic standing until all academic deficiencies have been removed and at least 12 hours of other 
college credit have been earned with a minimum GPA of 2.00. 

Freshmen will not be allowed to advance to sophomore status until they have passed the 
Freshman Composition Sequence and have a GPA of at least 1.70. Sophomores will not be 
permitted to advance to junior status or take any upper division courses until they have a GPA of at 
least 2.00. Juniors will not be advanced to senior status or permitted to submit an approved final 
year schedule for graduation until they have passed the English Proficiency Test or EN 250 and 
have a GPA of at least 2.00. 

Permanent Student Records 

The student's permanent academic record is the transcript. The transcript contains bio- 
graphical, geographical, and academic information regarding courses taken and grades earned. 
This information is taken from application for acceptance forms, registration forms, teachers' 
grade sheets, drop/add forms, and teachers' change-of-grade forms. 

Retention and Disposal of Student Records 

The retention and disposal of student records is in accordance with the recommendations of 
the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers, as published in the 
guide entitled Retention of Records: A Guide for Retention and Disposal of Student Records. 

Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act 

Oakwood College complies with the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act of 1 974 (FERPA). 
A student's record is regarded as confidential, and release of this information is regulated by the 
FERPA Act. Students have the right to inspect their records at any time. Parents of students 
termed "dependent" for income tax purposes are entitled to receive information relating to the 
students' educational records upon request. A copy of the act is on file in the Records Office. 

Registration 

Registration includes advising, selection of courses, and payment of fees. Students are 
required to register on the designated registration dates as announced in the bulletin. Information 
on registration is available at the registration site. 

Students are not officially registered for courses until their "registration forms" have been 
processed by the Records Office and all fees have been paid. 

Late Registration 

Students failing to register during the scheduled registration periods are assessed a late 
registration fee of $75 and $15 for each additional day, to a maximum of $135. Class periods 



missed because of late registration are counted as absences from the class. Students register- 
ing late may be required by the advisor and the vice president for Academic Affairs to reduce their 
class load. Late registrants are required to make up course work already missed. 

Withdrawal From College Courses 

If students want to add or drop a class or change a section after having completed registration 
of credit or audit, they should follow these procedures: 

1 . Drop. Before the deadline (one week after midsemester): (a) obtain form from the Record's 
Office, (b) secure proper signatures, (c) pay the appropriate fee, and (d) return the form 
to the Records Office. Expect a W for the class if dropped between the last day for a 50 
percent refund and the deadline. Forgetting or failure to drop officially through process- 
ing a form will result in final grade of FA. 

2. Add. By the last day of late registration, follow the same steps (a-d) as listed above under 
"Drop." A charge of $10 is made for each change of schedule until the last day for any 
tuition refund, except when the change is made necessary by the cancellation of a sched- 
uled class or the change of class time which renders it impossible for students to maintain 
their original schedule. 

3. To discontinue a course of study, students must complete a terminal leave form one week 
before final examinations begin, which may be secured from the Office of Student Ser- 
vices. 

Withdrawal From College Due to Disciplinary Action 

A student suspended for disciplinary reasons will not be allowed to make up class work 
assigned and done during his/her absence. Missed work will incur a grade of "F" and will be 
computed in the student's final grade. 

Final Examinations 

Should the final examination schedule require a student to complete four examinations in one 
day, arrangements may be made with the department chair to complete one of the examinations at 
another time. OthenA/ise, all students must take the final examination in each course at the time 
listed in the official time schedule. Exceptions may be made only by the vice president for 
Academic Affairs. 

English Proficiency Examination 

Each student is required to take a proficiency examination in English during the junior year. 
Upper division transfer students who have completed Freshman Composition are required to take 
the English Proficiency Examination during the first semester in which the examination is offered. 
This examination is administered as scheduled in the calendar, once each during the fall and 
spring semesters and immediately following spring graduation. Students who fail to pass the 
examination twice are required to enroll in and pass EN 250 English Fundamentals in order to 
qualify for graduation. Students who take EN 304 at Oakwood College and receive at least a B 
(3.00) are exempt from this examination. A fee of $30 is charged for this examination. See the 
Department of English and Communications for details. 



40 



Exit Examination 

All seniors are required to pass a departmental exit examination in their major area of study 
prior to graduation. Exit examinations may be internal or external, written by the department or 
obtained from an external sources such as the Graduate Record Examination. 

Life Experience Policy 

Life experience credit is granted upon the evaluation of accomplishments and competencies 
not ordinarily considered part of the traditional classroom experience. The policy is geared 
toward the mature adult who has had a minimum of ten years' experience in a given area. Credit, 
however, is not applicable until the student has completed a minimum of 1 6 semester hours with a 
minimum GPA of 2.00 at Oakwood College. 

Any credit granted will be for the learning gained, and not just for experience itself. Therefore, 
it is the students' responsibility to prove to the satisfaction of the Academic Policies Committee that 
from their experience they have developed competencies that are equivalent to classroom learn- 
ing. In order to qualify to sit for the challenge examinations, students should follow these proce- 
dures: 

1 . Describe learning experiences believed to translate into academic credit. 

2. Suggest what courses are applicable. 

3. Review document with academic advisor. 

4. Submit documentary evidence that may be used to verify the experiences identified (this 
would include testimonials from former employers and/or supervisors). 

5. Pass challenge examinations in areas for which credit is expected. 

The following evaluation formula will be used: 

1 . Three hours will be given for each year of full-time work approved for credit by examina- 
tion. 

2. Not more than 25 percent of the 128 hours required for graduation shall be earned 
through life experience. 

3. Not more than 25 percent of the requirements for the major may be met through life 
experience credit. 

The charge for life experience credit by examination is $35 per credit hour. 

College Level Examination Program (CLEP) 

A student who presents satisfactory evidence of having competence or exposure in a certain 
area covered by a required course may meet an academic requirement by passing a CLEP test. 
The following policies apply to the program: 

1 . The recommended maximum number of CLEP credits a student may apply toward gradu- 
ation is 32 semester hours. 

2. In each major the maximum number of CLEP subject examination credits a student may 
earn is determined by the major department. 

3. In the case of the general education requirements, the Academic Policies Committee will 
determine which courses can be taken by CLEP and how much credit a student may earn 
from the basic general education requirements without overlapping in the subject area. 

4. The minimum scores listed below must be acquired before credit can be granted. Changes 
in scores by ETS (Educational Testing Services) may change acceptable scores by 

41 



Oakwood College. 

5. Acceptable CLEP scores shall earn corresponding course credit, but no letter grade shall 
be assigned or quality points considered. 

6. Once CLEP credit is placed on the transcript, a student may not repeat the course for 
which credit was given by examination for a grade. 

7. Incoming students wishing to take the CLEP test before entering Oakwood College must 
have the approval of the Records Office before the test is taken. 

8. All CLEP scores previously obtained at another school are subject to review by the Records 
Office. 

9. A fee covering the cost of the examination and its administration will be charged each 
student desiring to take the CLEP examination at Oakwood College. 

The following table lists the CLEP subjects, corresponding courses and minimum scores 
acceptable by Oakwood College: 



CLEP subject 



Score 



Course Equivalent 



American Government 


47 


PS 211 


(3 hours) 


American Literature 


46 


EN 301 , 302 


(6 hours) 


Calculus with Elementary Education 


47 


MA 171-172 


(6 hours) 


College Algebra 


46 


MA 121 


(3 hours) 


College French 


45 


FR 101-102 


(6 hours) 


College Spanish 


45 


SP 101-102 


(6 hours) 


English Literature 


46 


EN 211, 212 


(6 hours) 


Freshman College Composition 


44 


EN 111 


(3 hours) 


General Biology 


46 


Bl 131-132 


(6 hours) 


General Chemistry 


48 


CH 141-142 


(6 hours) 


History of the United States 1 and II 


46 


HI 211, 212 


(6 hours) 


Human Growth and Development 


45 


FS355 


(3 hours) 


Information Systems and Computer 


52 


AS 100 


(3 hours) 


Applications 








Introduction to Educational Psychology* 


47 


ED 200 


(3 hours) 


Introductory Accounting 


47 


AC 220-221 


(6 hours) 


Introductory Business Law 


51 


BA475 


(3 hours) 


Introductory Psychology 


47 


PY101 


(3 hours) 


Introductory Sociology 


47 


SO 101 


(3 hours) 


Principles of Macroeconomics 


44 


EC 281 


(3 hours) 


Principles of Microeconomics 


41 


EC 282 


(3 hours) 


Principles of Management 


46 


BA310 


(3 hours) 


Principles of Marketing 


50 


MK301 


(3 hours) 


Trigonometry 


49 


MA 122 


(3 hours) 


Western Civilization 1 and II 


46,47 


HI 103, 104 


(6 hours) 



*Not acceptable for education majors. 



42 



Grading System 

The college grading system utilizes the four-point scale. The grade point values are outlined 
as follows: 

Grade Grade Point 

Per Hour 

A (superior) 4.0 

A- 3.7 

B+ 3.3 

B (above average) 3.0 

B- 2.7 

C+ 2.3 

C (average) 2.0 

C- 1.7 

D+ 1.3 

D (below average) 1.0 

D- 0.7 

F (failure) 0.0 

FA (failure due to absences) 0.0 

AU (audit) 

DG (deferred grade) 

I (incomplete) 0.0 

NC (noncredit) 

P/U (pass/unsatisfactory) 

W (withdrew) 

Grade Point Average 

The grade point average (GPA) for the semester is computed by totaling honor points earned 
in all courses attempted and dividing by the total hours attempted (GPA=HP/HA). Credits for 
which grades of F, FA, and I are received are included in calculating the grade point average. The 
symbols AU, NC, DG, W, and P/U are disregarded in computing the grade point average. 

The academic progress record allows for repeated courses without GPA penalty. However, 
the GPA used to determine the eligibility for financial aid includes all work attempted. 

Pass/Unsatisfactory Procedures 

To qualify for taking courses on a pass/unsatisfactory basis, a student must be a sophomore, 
junior, or senior, and must not be on academic probation. Not more than 16 hours may be taken 
on this basis. The pass/unsatisfactory system applies to elective courses only. A pass is equiva- 
lent to a C, although some graduate and professional schools treat the pass as a D. 

Approval for the P/U option should be obtained at the Records Office before the close of late 
registration. Registration changes in the process are final as of the last day to drop without 
academic penalty. 

Deferred Grades 

A deferred grade is assigned when a student is unable to complete the work because of 
equipment failure, insufficient time, or research material having arrived late. 



43 



Incomplete Work 

When at the end of a semester students are behind in their classwork, the teacher does not 
automatically grant a grade of I for more time to do the requirements. However, because of 
interruptive illness or other unavoidable circumstances, students may request the privilege of 
receiving a grade of I to allow more time to fulfill class requirements. They must apply in time so 
that a final decision is made before the beginning of final examination week. The procedures to be 
followed are: 

1 . Obtain and fill out a "Request and Authorization for Incomplete" from the Office of Aca- 
demic Affairs. 

2. Attach a physican's statement if the reason is medical. 

3. Obtain the appropriate signatures. 

4. Return the form to the Office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs at least five 
working days before the beginning of final examinations. 

An I may be changed to a regular grade when the class work is completed within the approved 
deadline. Such a deadline might range from a few days to several weeks, but no longer than the 
sixth week of the next semester, even when the student is not registered the next semester. The I 
automatically coverts to an F if not removed within the prescribed time. Should more time, be- 
cause of further illness or unavoidable circumstances, be needed to remove the incomplete, the 
student may, before the deadline expires, request in writing an extension of time from the Aca- 
demic Policies Committee. 

Repeated Courses 

There is no limit to the number of times a course may be repeated. The better grade for the 
repeated course will be accepted for credit. 

Auditing Courses 

Persons who are interested in auditing courses should register during regular registration. No 
credit is given for a course audited, and the tuition charged is one-half the regular charge for 
credit. A course started on the auditing basis cannot be changed to a credit basis after the first 
week of the course. 

Correspondence Courses 

Oakwood College recognizes and accepts credit for courses taken with Home Study Interna- 
tional, which is the extension division of the Associated Colleges of Seventh-day Adventists. 

A maximum of 1 2 semester hours of correspondence work may apply toward a baccalaureate 
degree program and 8 semester hours toward an associate degree. All requests for correspon- 
dence work must be approved by the Records Office and /or the Academic Policies Committee. 

While enrolled at Oakwood, a student will not be permitted to carry correspondence if the 
course is available at the college. 

It is not recommended that seniors do any correspondence or extension work. Where this is 
an absolute necessity, the official transcript for the work completed must be in the Records Office 
by the first business day in March for spring graduation. 

A correspondence course with a D grade or below is unacceptable. No correspondence 
credit will be entered on the student's record until a minimum of 16 hours in residence with a 
cumulative average of at least C has been earned. Home Study Institute courses do not meet the 
Alabama State Certification requirements for education majors. 



44 



Grade Reports 

Grade reports are issued to the student and, if requested by the student, to the parents or 
guardians at the end of each semester. 

Errors and Corrections 

Upon the receipt of a grade report, the student should carefully check it for correctness as to 
the courses, credits, and grades recorded. Requests for corrections must be initiated within one 
month. 

Dean's List 

Students with a minimum grade point average of 3.50 who carry a minimum of 15 semester 
hours with no grade below a B (3.00) and no incompletes are eligible for membership on the 
Dean's List. 

Honor Roll 

Students who carry a minimum of 12 hours and maintain a grade point average of 3.00 or 
above during a given semester with no grade below a C (2.00) shall be considered honor students 
for the semester. 

Honors Convocation 

To give formal and public recognition for outstanding scholastic achievement, loyalty to college 
standards, and exemplary citizenship, the college conducts an annual Honors Convocation. To be 
eligible for participation the student must have a cumulative GPA of not less than 3.50 for a 
minimum of 24 hours earned at Oakwood College or a cumulative GPA of 3.25 and a minimum of 
33 hours earned at Oakwood College. 

Graduation With Distinction 

Students are graduated with honors under the following conditions: 
Honorable Mention Minimum cumulative GPA of 3.25 

Cum Laude Minimum cumulative GPA of 3.50 

Magna Cum Laude Minimum cumulative GPA of 3.75 

Summa Cum Laude Minimum cumulative GPA of 3.90 

Academic Probation, Suspension, and Dismissal 

All students whose cumulative GPA is less than 2.00 are placed on academic probation. This 
status requires all academic probationary students to take part in the academic improvement 
program conducted by the Center for Academic Advancement (CAA). Failure of an academic 
probation student to take part in this program may result in dismissal from the college. Students 
who fail to make acceptable academic progress in view of the established policies and procedures 
of the institution will be suspended. A first suspension because of poor academic performance 
will result in the student being ineligible for readmission or reacceptance consideration for a 
period of one semester from the date of suspension. When suspended a second time, students 
become eligible for readmission or reacceptance after one calendar year from the suspension 
date, providing that during that time they have attended another accredited college for at least one 
semester, carrying a minimum of 1 2 semester hours with no grade lower than C. In both cases, to 



45 



be so considered, the student must apply for readmission through the Records Office. 

Any student who after four academic semesters or 64 semester hours has not attained a 
cumulative GPA of 2.00 will be dismissed for a minimum of two semesters. During this time the 
student must attend another accredited college for each semester of dismissal carrying a mini- 
mum of 12 hours with no grade lower than C. Course requirements must include classes previ- 
ously taken at Oakwood that received grades of D or F. Application for readmission must be filed 
with the Records Office. 

A student whose cumulative GPA is below 2.00 is denied the opportunity and permission to 
represent the college in any official capacity or to hold office in any student organization, or to be 
employed in any academic administrative area involving records and confidentiality. Some social 
restrictions involving leave requests may also apply. 

The following is a list of requirements for students on academic probation: 

1 . Limit registration to class load of 1 3 hours per semester. 

2. Must be advised by the CAA academic advisors for class schedule approval during regis- 
tration. 

3. Include in class load courses in which the student received a D or F. 

4. Must register for remedial courses when the following conditions exist: ACT English score 
is less than 1 6 or SAT English score is less than 41 0; student must register for EN 095 and 
EN 099. ACT mathematics score is less than 16 or SAT mathematics score is less than 
41 0; students must register for MA 095. ACT composite is less than 1 7 or SAT composite 
is less than 840; students must take PY 095. 

5. Must successfully pass remedial courses with at least a C before registering for classes in 
English or mathematics. 

6. Must receive weekly tutorial assistance at the CAA. 

7. Must attend weekly advising sessions with the CAA academic advisor. 

Students on academic probation should expect to take more than two years to complete the 
requirements for an associate degree and more than four years to graduate with a bachelor's 
degree. 

Center for Academic Advancement 

The mission of the Center for Academic Advancement (CAA) is to assist students to gain the 
skills necessary to do college-level work. The program, in collaboration with the Departments of 
Psychology, Mathematics and Computer Science, and English and Communications, offers Schol- 
arship Skills, Introduction to College Math, Composition Skill Review, and Developmental Reading 
to select groups of student who need to develop basic skills. In addition to attending regular lecture 
classes, students must attend a laboratory as prescribed by the instructor. However, all labs are 
available to self-motivated students as they assist students across the curricula in tutorials, exer- 
cises, applications, and reviews. 

The laboratory component provides opportunity for individualized instruction consistent with 
student needs and desires. This also gives students the opportunity to assess their deficiencies, 
work to correct them, and receive instant feedback. Upgraded tutorial services supplement the 
developmental laboratories through the cooperative efforts of specialists and the tutor supervisor. 
Limited accommodations are provided for students with disabilities. 

Freshman Studies 

The Freshman Studies Program is a composite of diagnostic, instructional, and supportive 
services to first-year students. Its purpose is to increase their potential for academic success and 
personal adjustment to the demands of college life. Beginning in the 1999-2000 school year, all 



46 



entering first-year students and lower division transfer students will be required to take a sennes- 
ter-long orientation in addition to the week-long orientation. 

OC101 Freshman Orientation Seminar 

The Freshman Orientation Seminar is designed to provide pertinent information to help new 
students to make the most of college, this life, and the life to come. This will be accomplished 
by focusing on challenges that integrate the academic, social, and spiritual facets of life, 
therefore, placing an emphasis on opening the doors to "Education, Excellence, Eternity." 

This course is required of all freshmen and new students entering with less than 30 semester 
hours of transfer credit. Students are not allowed to withdraw from this course except through the 
terminal leave process. 

Orientation 

The week preceding registration for the fall semester of each year is known as Freshmen 
Orientation Week. New students admitted to freshman status are expected to report as notified 
and, upon arrival, to participate in all of the scheduled activities of the week. These include 
orientation to the academic and residential requirements of the college and the resources that are 
available to assist all students in meeting them successfully, along with developmental guidance 
and instruction regarding tasks, skills, and attitudes that are essential for academic and personal 
success. 

Monitoring Students' Academic Progress (IVISAP) 

The Committee on Monitoring Students' Academic Progress (MSAP), which consists of a 
consortium of college administrators, departmental chairs, faculty, and staff, ensures students' 
conformance and compliance to the academic policies of the institution. Qualitative and quantita- 
tive data of students, such as GPAs, class reports, class failures, remediation, withdrawals, 
incompletes, and maximum time frames for academic work completion, are all used to determine a 
student's chances of successfully completing the major course of study. 

At least twice a year, this committee meets to review the academic progress of students whose 
academic standing is in jeopardy. Recommendations are made to suspend, dismiss, retain, or 
warn based on the data presented. 

The committee considers a student's academic progress to be in a serious status when the 
first semester's current GPA is less than 1 .00, or after two semesters the cumulative GPA is less 
than 1 .50, or after four semesters or a total of 64 hours the cumulative GPA is less than 2.00. 

Remedial Courses 

Beginning freshmen entering Oakwood College on academic probation must pursue a pre- 
scribed course of remedial studies during their first year, which may include any of the following: 
EN 095, EN 099, MA 095, and PY 095. In addition, students who have scored less than 500 on the 
TOEFL must take EN 090 and EN 091 during the first year. 

These remedial courses, which are in addition to the 128 hours needed for graduation, must 
each be passed with a minimum grade of C. Any course failed must be repeated the next 
semester until passed. Grades and hours received from remedial courses will not be computed for 
graduation purposes in the cumulative GPA. 



47 



Diagnostic Testing 

During Freshman Orientation Week, the American College Test (ACT) will be administered to 
new freshmen who have not already taken it or the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT). 

Results are used for placing students in appropriate courses of study, fulfilling Alabama state 
requirements for entrance into special programs and assisting advisors and counselors in their 
work of helping students to plan their academic programs, evaluate their academic progress, and 
set realistic personal and career goals. Accumulated data will help the college to determine what 
areas of its programs and services need strengthening and/or modification in order to effectively 
fulfill its commitment to the success of its students. Test scores are to be used for institutional 
purposes and cannot be released to another college. 

Academic Advisement and Program Planning 

Although their declared interests in specific disciplines will be acknowledged, first-year stu- 
dents will be encouraged to concentrate on general education requirements for the purpose of 
academic exploration and continuing self-discovery. Freshman advisors, by means of extended 
interviews and performance reviews throughout the year, will assist in the process of confirming or 
modifying the personal interests and aspirations of each student. 

Special Services 

Students with special academic and developmental needs will receive appropriate assistance 
from CAA, the school's learning resource center. Assistance will be in the form of individualized 
course loads, specialized instruction, tutoring, and counseling performed by a dedicated staff of 
professional counselors and selected honor students. Referrals for more specialized services will 
be made as warranted. 

The Eva B. Dykes Library 

The Eva B. Dykes Library is a resource and information technology support center for the 
academic program at Oakwood College. Information services are provided for faculty, students, 
staff, and administrative patrons for learning, teaching, and research purposes. The collection 
holdings include books, periodicals and journals, reference resources, multimedia, archival, mi- 
croform, CD-ROM, electronic Internet databases, documents, and other materials. 

The library archives, located on the lower floor, houses a special historical collection of docu- 
ments, reports, papers, photographs, and other materials about Oakwood College history and 
African-American Seventh-day Adventism. A historical museum located on the main floor lobby 
area displays and exhibits a pictorial and artifact collection concerning the growth and develop- 
ment of the college and the North American Black SDA work. 

Reference services include interlibrary loans, bibliographic instruction, research assistance, 
and online computerized search assistance. Automated online public access catalog service and 
computerized software and hardware are provided for rapid information retrieval. 

The circulation desk at the main entrance is automated. ID cards with library bar codes are 
used to borrow book materials. Reserve materials are located in the circulation area. Photocopy 
service is available, and computer printing is provided. The library is open 81 hours weekly. 

The Information Technology Center 

Oakwood College is moving rapidly toward the goal of creating an electronic campus. The 
centerpiece of this goal is the Technology Center, located in the lower level of the Eva B. Dykes 
Library. Here you will find a fully functioning, 42-station pentium computer lab; a smaller, 13- 



48 



station research and training laboratory; a 4-station special projects lab for graphic design and 
web page development; a distance learning lab employing high speed, two-way compressed video 
and administrative offices. Each lab provides the following: Internet access via fiberoptic, T-1 
connections; e-mail availability; Microsoft Office Suite; Corel WordPerfect Office Suite; remote 
access, dial-up connectivity; specialized software for independent learning and research assign- 
ments; Oakwood College web-page access and other network resources. 

Students, faculty staff, and alumni are invited to use these computerized multimedia re- 
sources for optimum learning experiences and administrative improvement. 

The Ellen G. White Estate Oakwood Branch Office 

The Ellen G. White Estate Oakwood Branch Office is a research center located on the lower 
floor of the library It houses several complete sets of Ellen White's published writings, duplicates 
of her original letters and manuscripts (1844-1915), books about Ellen White and other Seventh- 
day Adventist pioneers, denominational histories, and other related documents. Microfiche, mi- 
crofilm, and Ellen White research software are available. 

Department Curriculum Laboratories 

Individual departments of the college may have centers or laboratories for the practical use of 
their students. For instance, the Mathematics Department has a mathematics/computer science 
laboratory located in the Cooper Science Complex, Building B, designed as a center for the 
reinforcement of biology chemistry and physics. The Department of Music has a music labora- 
tory, located in the Center for Academic Advancement, designed to help the prospective music 
student overcome deficiencies. The Departments of Psychology and Social Work share a com- 
puter laboratory located in Green Hall. Other departments have seminar rooms and places where 
students may use computers or get special assistance. 

Cooperative Programs 

Cooperative programs are made available at Oakwood College for visiting students. 

A visiting student arrangement exists with Alabama A & M University, Athens State College, 
John C. Calhoun State Community College, the University of Alabama in Huntsville, and Oakwood 
College. Under this arrangement, a student at any of the participating institutions may request 
permission to attend a class at one of the other schools. Conditions governing the granting of 
permission include the following: 

1 . The student must be a full-time student. 

2. The student must have an overall C average. 

3. The course desired must be unavailable at the student's home institution. 

4. The student's request must be approved by the advisor and other appropriate personnel. 

5. Permission of the institution teaching the course is dependent upon availability of space 
for the visitor after its own students are accommodated. 

Any student interested in participating in the Visiting Student Program should contact the Vice 
President for Academic Affairs for information and procedures. 

Adventist Colleges Abroad 

Adventist Colleges Abroad (ACA) is a consortium of Seventh-day Adventist colleges and 
universities in North America under the auspices of the Board of Higher Education, General 
Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, Maryland. 



49 



The ACA consortium provides opportunities to qualified undergraduate students for study in 
other countries, such as Argentina, Austria, France, Kenya, and Spain, while completing the 
requirements of their programs at their home colleges. This allows students to be immersed in the 
culture and life of another country while becoming conversant in its language. Through such 
experiences students also may gain an appreciation of, and perhaps an inspiration for, mission or 
other multicultural service (see Records Office for details). 

Student Missionary Program 

Each year several Oakwood students go to foreign lands to serve as missionaries. The range 
of their responsibilities include religious leadership, teaching, and industrial/vocational work. For 
details, contact the Department of Campus Ministries, Oakwood College. 

Following are the academic requirements for student missionaries: 

1 . Applicants must have attained at least sophomore standing (minimum 30 semester hours) 
with a cumulative grade point average of C or above, and no grade below C in all English 
composition and grammar courses. 

2. Applicants must have a B average or above in the subject area that they are expected to 
teach as student missionaries. 

3. Upon completion of a year of satisfactory service as a student missionary, the student 
shall receive three hours of elective credit on a pass/fail basis in the area of Student 
Foreign Service. Quality of service is determined by a written evaluation from the imme- 
diate supervisor or appropriate official over the student missionary. Students may opt for 
an additional three hours should they secure prior approval from the instructional depart- 
ment and the Academic Policies Committee establishing that more specialized mission 
services will be experienced, such as, but not limited to, teaching certain academic disci- 
plines. 

Student missionaries in active service are considered full-time students. 

Community and Service Learning Course (OC201 ) 

This is a seminar (one credit hour) course designed to allow the student to gain a better 
understanding of community service, leadership development, citizenship, community awareness, 
global awareness, and ethnical/legal considerations involved in volunteerism in the community. It is 
designed to help students come to a personal understanding of community service and leadership 
through learning based on volunteer service experience, readings, group discussion, interaction 
and critical reflection. The course builds on the premise that individual citizens have both an 
opportunity and a responsibility to be involved in the life of the community and in addressing 
community problems. 



Otiier Academic Information 

Writing Emphasis Courses 

Two writing emphasis courses of at least two hours each are required of all upper division 
students. Each department will designate and supervise at least one required course for its majors 
which will emphasize essay type tests and/or written reports or a term paper. A (W) after a course 
title designates a writing course. 



50 



Summer School 

The college offers a limited number of brief intensive courses and workshops. Undergraduate 
courses in the teacher certification program are also offered. Students may also pursue the 
M.A.T. degree in the Graduate Extension Program offered by Andrews University. 

Transient Letters 

Students desiring to register at another college or university with the intent of returning must 
obtain a transient letter from the Records Office, which recommends the student for temporary 
admission to the other school without the student's having to go through normal admission require- 
ments. Transient letters, however, are not granted for attendance at colleges or universities within 
a fifty-mile radius of Huntsville during the fall or spring semesters. 

Transient credit with grades below C- is unacceptable. Acceptable credit is recorded as 
transfer credit. Students from other schools desiring transient admission to Oakwood must pro- 
vide an official letter of support from the home institution. 

Transcripts 

The Records Office releases official transcripts of a student's work at the college upon the 
student's written request. Telephone requests cannot be honored. 

A student may secure an unofficial transcript to use, but official transcripts must be sent 
directly to other colleges, organizations, and approved sources. 

The college reserves the right to withhold all information concerning the record of any student 
who has unpaid accounts or other charges, or who is in delinquent or default status in payment of 
student loans. 

Two weeks should be allowed for the processing and mailing of the transcript after the request 
has been received. Official transcripts from other institutions which have been presented to 
Oakwood for admission and evaluation of credit become the property of Oakwood and are not 
reissued or copied for release. Each student is entitled to one official transcript without charge. A 
fee of $2.00 is charged for each additional official transcript and $1 .00 for an unofficial transcript 
for students not enrolled. Other fees assessed as applicable. 

Class Absences 

Attendance with punctuality is required at all classes and laboratory appointments. Absences 
are counted from the first official day of classes. If for any reason the total hours of absences are 
double the number of credit hours of the course per semester, credit may, at the discretion of the 
instructor, be forfeited and a grade of FA be recorded. 

Authorized leaves of absence from campus do not excuse the student from required class 
work. The student, however, must make arrangements with the teacher for every anticipated 
school trip and other authorized leaves at least 72 hours before the beginning of such anticipated 
schedules. All makeup work involving examinations and other class requirements must be made 
up within seven days after the absence occurs. 

It is the responsibility of students to keep a record of their absences, to keep themselves 
informed of the requirements of the instructor, to take all examinations at the time prescribed by 
the instructor, and to turn in all assignments when they are due. 

Academic Honesty 

Oakwood College is dedicated to scholastic integrity. Consequently, students of the college 
are required to maintain high Christian standards of honesty. If students are found or suspected of 



51 



engaging in any of the following types of academic misconduct, the procedures set forth in this 
policy will be implemented. 

Types of Academic Dishonesty: 

1. Dishonesty in testing (e.g., copying from another student's paper, using unauthorized 
materials, or collaborating with any other person without authority from the instructor 
during an examination; stealing test materials; obtaining test information prior, during, or 
after an administered examination; or any other form of test dishonesty). 

2. Plagiarism — defined as unacknowledged use of another's work (e.g., submitting any writ- 
ten, oral, aesthetic, computer, or laboratory work prepared totally or in part by another 
person; such work need not be copyrighted). 

3. Any other practice deemed by the college as academic misconduct not listed above. 

Procedures for Handling Academic Dishonesty 

If a teacher finds irrefutable evidence of academic dishonesty, the teacher should immedi- 
ately speak with the student and issue zero credit for the particular examination, assignment, or 
project. 

If academic misconduct is suspected by a teacher, that teacher must follow certain steps. 

1 . The teacher must first speak with the student about the question of dishonesty. If the 
student acknowledges engaging in academic misconduct, the student will be given no 
credit for the particular examination, assignment, or project. 

2. If the situation cannot be resolved between the teacher and student, then it must be 
brought to the attention of the teacher's department chair. 

3. If the department chair is unable to resolve the matter, the Vice President for Academic 
Affairs must then be consulted, and may refer the issue to the Academic Appeals Com- 
mittee. 

4. Subsequent incidents of academic dishonesty make a student eligible for dismissal from 
the college. Students are, however, given the option of appealing this decision to the 
Academic Appeals Committee. 

5. Each established incident of academic misconduct shall be departmentally documented 
and submitted to both the student, the student's major department chair, the vice president 
for Academic Affairs, and the vice president for Student Services. 

Academic Grievance 

Any student who desires to express concern regarding instructional matters such as per- 
ceived unfairness, grading methodology, cheating, or some other misunderstanding within or 
without the classroom is encouraged to confer first with the teacher of the class and, if deemed 
necessary, with the teacher's department chair. If the matter is not resolved satisfactorily at the 
first two levels, the student should contact the vice president for Academic Affairs. 

The vice president for Academic Affairs will review the matter to (a) make a final determination 
of the matter, or (b) refer the matter to the Academic Appeal Committee for further review and 
recommendation. In either case, the final decision is the responsibility of the vice president for 
Academic Affairs. 

The Academic Appeal Committee receives referrals directly from the vice president for Aca- 
demic Affairs. Cases are referred to this committee if the vice president for Academic Affairs 
determines more information is needed to make an equitable decision. The process is as follows: 
(a) the vice president for Academic Affairs notifies the chair of the Academic Appeal Committee 
of the student's concern, (b) the aggrieved student submits a written report of the complaint to the 



52 



chair of the Academic Appeal Committee, and (c) a recommendation is made to the vice presi- 
dent for Academic Affairs. 

Students or faculty members have the option to appear in person before the Academic Ap- 
peal Committee, bringing documentation to support their views; however, it is not required that 
they appear in person. It should be understood that the purpose of the appeals process is to 
peaceably resolve issues which have not been resolved through other means. Therefore, the 
approach to problem resolution in the appeal process is through consensus, so far as is possible. 

The membership of the Academic Appeal Committee consists of six individuals: the USM 
academic vice president (chair), two elected student representatives, two full-time teaching fac- 
ulty, and one full-time staff member. The vice president for Academic Affairs or designee may 
choose to sit with the Academic Appeal Committee for purposes of hearing the discussion or for 
clarification of issues, but not for voting purposes. 

Bulletin Selection 

Students may meet degree requirements under the bulletin of initial registration or any bulletin 
in effect during the time of continuous residence at Oakwood. Selecting the senior year bulletin 
must be done prior to the final semester of the graduating year. Students who discontinue enroll- 
ment must meet the following bulletin requirements: 

1 . If not enrolled for one calendar year or less, students may return under any bulletin in 
effect during their previous continuous residence. Transfer credit will be accepted pro- 
vided that a transient letter request has received prior approval from the Records Office. 

2. Students not enrolled for more than one calendar year must meet the requirements of the 
current bulletin. 

3. Seniors with 9 hours or less remaining at the time of spring graduation have a maximum 
of two calendar years to complete their requirements and remain under the bulletin they 
selected during their senior year. 

4. All transfer students must fulfill the requirements of the current bulletin. 

Double Major 

Students may enroll for a double major provided they meet all of the requirements for both 
majors. Pursuing a double major will require more than 1 28 hours and take longer than four years 
to complete. 

Medicine 

Biology and chemistry are the most frequently chosen majors at Oakwood for students pre- 
paring for a career in medicine. However, students from every academic major are accepted into 
medical school. Diversity is actually encouraged by many medical schools which have come to 
realize that students who pursue majors in art, literature, mathematics, engineering, and other 
areas of liberal arts study tend to become well-rounded, highly competent physicians. Most 
medical schools have the following science requirements: one year of general biology, two years 
of chemistry — general and organic, one year of general physics, and mathematics. 

Medical School Early Selection Program 

Students wishing to participate in the Oakwood College-Loma Linda University early selection 
programs (ESP) must apply by January 15 of their sophomore year. Students completing two 
summers as an ESP student in either dentistry or medicine will receive the appropriate hours on a 
pass/fail basis as follows: NS 320 Orientation to Dentistry and NS 321 Orientation to Medicine. 



53 



Students actively involved in the ESP are considered full-tinne students. 

Requirements for Baccalaureate Degrees 
General 

1 . A candidate for a degree must have a satisfactory academic record and be of good moral 
character. In addition, the candidate must possess personal attributes which will reflect 
well upon Oakwood College. The college reserves the sole and final right to determine 
whether the candidate possesses such personal attributes. 

2. The responsibility for meeting requirements for graduation rests primarily upon the stu- 
dents. They must acquaint themselves with the requirements as outlined in the College 
Bulletin, and, with the aid of their advisor, plan their work so as to fulfill each of the 
requirements at the regular level of academic progress. 

Quantitative 

1 . The satisfactory completion of required remedial courses and removal of admission defi- 
ciencies. This may add to the total hours required to complete the degree. 

2. The satisfactory completion of the general education requirements. 

3. The satisfactory completion of a major of at least 36 hours. Including a minimum of 16 
hours of upper division courses, except in Interdisciplinary Studies. 

4. The satisfactory completion of a minor, if required (see individual departments). A minor 
must be between 1 8-21 hours, of which 8 hours must be upper division. 

5. The satisfactory completion of the oral and written proficiency requirements (English 
Proficiency Examination and CO 201 Fundamentals of Public Speaking). 

6. The satisfactory completion of two upper division writing emphasis courses of at least 2 
hours each, one of which must be in the major. A (W) after a course title designates a 
writing course. 

7. The satisfactory completion of a minimum of 128 semester hours (remedial credits not 
included in total credits). Including 40 hours at the upper division level and not more than 
64 hours total in the major and minor. Remedial courses are not included in the total 
credits. 

8. The satisfactory completion of the major departmental exit examination. 

Qualitative 

1 . The attainment of a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.00 

2. The attainment of a minimum overall GPA of 2.25 in the major and 2.00 in the minor fields. 
No grade below C (2.00) may apply toward the major or minor. No grade below D (1 .00), 
or C- (1 .70) for EN 1 1 1 and EN 112, may apply toward the general education require- 
ments. 

Residence 

1 . The satisfactory completion of a minimum of 32 semester hours, of which 24 semester 
hours must be during the senior year. 

2. The satisfactory completion of a minimum of 20 semester hours at the upper division level. 

3. The satisfactory completion of 8 upper division hours In the major field. 

4. The satisfactory completion of 3 upper division hours in the minor field If a minor is 
selected. 



54 



The Bachelor of Arts in Interdisciplinary Studies 

The general education requirements are tlie same as for other B.A. degrees. Instead of a 
major, three disciplines of 24 hours each are required. Each discipline must include 1 1 upper 
division hours and fulfill the requirements for a minor, if offered, and be approved by separate 
advisors. No more than two disciplines can be from the same department. 

Second Bachelor's Degree 

Two different bachelor's degrees may be conferred at the same time if the candidate has met 
the requirements of both degrees and has completed a total of 1 60 semester hours of credit. The 
college does not grant two degrees of the same kind to any one person at the same time, such as 
two B.A.'s or two B.S.'s. Students may, however, earn a second degree after one degree has 
been conferred by completing an additional 32 semester credits, meeting the basic degree re- 
quirements of both degrees and the requirements of a second major. 

General Education Requirements for all Bachelor's Degrees 

All bachelor's degrees require a minimum of 128 semester hours composed of: general 
education requirements (53-64 hours); major requirements; and electives, as necessary, outside 
the major. Variations in the total hours required for degree completion or in the general education 
requirements are noted in the bulletin sections of the appropriate departments. In those instances 
where the credits for general education, the major, and electives within the major are less than 1 28 
hours, additional electives are required. Please consult the appropriate academic advisor for 
details. 

Orientation 1 hour 

Required: OC 101 

Education and Business 5 hours 

Required: ED 250 and AS 1 00 or AS 203. Students not having passed one year of high school 
typing must take AS 1 20. 

Health and Physical Education 5 hours 

Required: PE 21 1 and three hours of activity courses 

Humanities 15 hours 

Required: EN 111-112 (minimum C-), EN 201 or 211 or 212 or 301 or 302; AR217orMU 
200; and CO 201 . 

Modern Foreign Languages 0-6 hours 

Required of all candidates for the B.A. degree. All other degree candidates may be exempt if 
they have passed two years of the same foreign language in high school. 

Natural Sciences and Mathematics 12 hours 

Required: three hours each in Biology, Mathematics, and Physics or Chemistry; Recom- 
mended for nonscience majors: Bl 1 01 , MA 1 01 , and PH 1 01 or CH 1 00. The remaining three 
hours elected from Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, Physics, or Nutrition. 



55 



Religion and Theology 6-11 hours 

Required: RE 201 or 202 and RE 331 . (HI 31 4 may substitute for RE 331 , but will only receive 
history credit and requires three other hours of religion.) Of the remaining five hours, only 
three hours may be in applied theology. Students not having passed two years of high school 
Bible must include RE 1 01 , except transfer students who have completed six hours of college 
Bible. Requirements for transfer students: freshmen must take 1 1 hours, sophomores 8 
hours, juniors and seniors 6 hours. All transfer students must take RE 201 or 202 and RE 
331. 

Social Sciences 9 hours 

Required: HI 103 or 104 or HI 211 or 212; three hours elected from History, Geography, or 
Political Science; and PY 1 01 , SO 1 01 , or SW 201 . 

Total 53-64 hours 

Requirements for Associate Degrees 

1 . The satisfactory completion of required remedial courses and removal of admission deficien- 
cies. This may add to the total hours required to complete the degree. 

2. The satisfactory completion of the general education requirements. 

3. The satisfactory completion of a minimum of 64 semester hours with a minimum cumulative 
GPA of 2.00. 

4. The attainment of a minimum overall GPA of 2.25 in the major. No grade below C may apply 
toward the major. 

5. Aminimumof 24 semester hours in residence at Oakwood College. 

6. The satisfactory completion of the major departmental exit examination. 

7. A maximum of 32 semester hours in the major. 

General Education Requirements for Associate Degrees 

All associate degrees require a minimum of 64 semester hours, composed of: general educa- 
tion requirements (35); major requirements; electives, as required, in the major; and electives, as 
necessary, outside the major. Variations in the total hours required for degree completion or in the 
general education requirements are noted in the bulletin sections of the appropriate departments. 
In those instances where the credits for general education, the major, and electives within the 
major are less than 64 hours, additional electives are required. Please consult with the appropriate 
academic advisor for details. 

Orientation 1 hour 

Required: OC 101 

Business 3 hours 

Required: AS 100 or AS 203. Students not having passed one year of high school typing 
must take AS 120. 

Health and Physical Education 4 hours 

Required: PE 21 1 and two hours of activity courses. 

Humanities 9 hours 

Required: EN 1 1 1 -1 1 2 (minimum C-) and CO 201 . 



56 



Natural Science and Mathematics 6 iiours 

Required: MA 101 and one course from Bl 101, CH 101, FS 131, or PH 101. Advanced 
courses in these areas may be substituted with departmental approval. 

Religion and Theology 6 hours 

Required: RE 1 1 1 (RE 1 01 if student has not taken two years of high school Bible) and RE 201 
or 202. 

Social Sciences 6 hours 

Required: H1 1 03 or 1 04 or 21 1 or 21 2, and three hours from History, FY 1 01 , SO 1 01 , or SW 
201. 

Total 35 hours 

Degree Candidacy 

Students are considered degree candidates when the following have been satisfactorily met: 

1 . Approval of Application for Graduation and Final Year Schedule through the major advisor 
to the department chair (September 15), and the Senior Program Coordinator (October 
1 ), for students enrolled during the fall semester. 

2. Payment of the required graduation fee of $75 and $35 extra for each additional degree 
by January 15 ($10 late fee). 

3. CLEF, Home Study, incompletes, and transfer credit results must be in the Records Office 
by the first business day in March for spring graduation. 

No application for spring graduation will be accepted after February 1 . 

Graduation Diplomas 

Diplomas for degree candidates are ordered for those qualified to participate in the senior 
presentation program. Diplomas are only issued at Commencement to graduates who have ful- 
filled all academic and financial obligations with the college. 

Graduation in Absentia 

All degree candidates are expected to participate in the Commencement exercises. Requests 
to graduate in absentia must be sent to the Records Office accompanied by a $40 fee (this is in 
addition to the $75 graduation fee). 



57 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 

Department of Biological Sciences 

Professors: Lubega, Paul (Chair), Schmidt 

Associate Professors: Randriamahefa, Sovyanhadi, Uppala 

Assistant Professor: Durant, Maulsby 

Affiliate: Carson 

Majors: Biology (B.S.) 

Biology Education (B.S.) 
Natural Science (B.S.) 

Minor: Biology 

Purpose 

It is the purpose of the Department of Biological Sciences to develop in its students a thor- 
ough understanding of and an appreciation of the principles underlying the basic functions of 
living organisms. The curriculum is designed for those students wishing to enter graduate, 
medical, dental, or allied health schools, as well as for those planning to teach in elementary or 
secondary schools. Opportunity is also available for laboratory research for those planning to 
enter research careers. 

High School Preparation 

Courses in biology, chemistry, general science, and mathematics are all highly desirable, 
and it is strongly recommended that all high school students wishing to pursue a career in the 
sciences take these classes. 

Application for Admission 

To be admitted as a major in the Department of Biological Sciences, students must have 
completed at least 32 hours of course work, including EN 112 Freshman Composition and Bl 
132 General Biology and have an overall GPA of 2.25. 

Exit Examination 

All senior biology majors are required to take one of the following exit examinations: the ETS 
Biology Test, which must be passed within two standard deviations of the national norm or the 
GRE Advanced Biology Test which must be passed with a score of at least 850. 

Career Opportunities 

Biology remains the major of choices for students desirous of becoming medical doctors. 
However, biology, the study of living things, is a science that encompasses many specialties and 
opportunities for rewarding careers. Modern biology pursues the quest for a full understanding, 
at the molecular level, of the basic mechanisms underlying life processes, while also concerning 
itself with current social issues related to human health, behavior, overpopulation, and the impact 
made on the earth's natural, life-sustaining environment. Many trained biologists and health pro- 

58 



fessionals will be needed in the search for effective answers to such dilemmas as AIDS, cancer, 
autoimmune disorders, and inborn errors of metabolism. 

Graduates from this department may also pursue careers in agriculture, allied health profes- 
sions, environmental sciences, dentistry, medicine, and teaching. 

Bachelor of Science in Biology 

Major Requirements: 

)) Bl 131-132 General Biology 8 hours 

Bl 204 Introduction to Research 1 hour 

*' Bl 230 Plant Biology 3 hours 

I) Bl 321 Genetics 3 hours 

Bl 323 Undergraduate Research 1 hour 

'^ Bl 401-402 Biology Seminar 2 hours 

I) Bl 430 Philosophy of Science 2 hours 

Bl 460 Cell and Molecular Biology 3 hours 

'' Bl Electives* 17 hours 

I) MA 171 Calculus (MA 121-122 may be required first) or 

MA 21 1 Survey of Calculus 

'' ( MA 121-122 may be required first) 3 or 4 hours 

I) PH 103-104 General Physics 8 hours 

CH 141-142 General Chemistry 8 hours 

'^ CH 3i 1-312 Organic Chemistry 6 hours 

I) CH 31 1L-312L Organic Chemistry Laboratory 2 hours 

Total 67-68 hours 

\) *Premedical students should include Bl 225 Embryology, Bl 331 Histology, and Bl 481-482 

Mammalian Anatomy as part of their biology electives; premedical students may also wish to take 
'^ CH 401 -402 Biochemistry, and discuss requirements for medical school with their advisors by the 
)] first semester of their junior year. 

'' Bachelor of Science Biology Education 

This program qualifies a person to teach secondary school biology. After graduation, stu- 
' dents may apply for the Alabama Class B Certificate: Biology, grades 7-12; and the SDA Basic 
) Teaching Certificate: Biology, grades 7-12. 

Refer to the Department of Education section in this bulletin for the program outline. Pro- 
gram advisor: S. Lubega. 



Bachelor of Science in Natural Science 

Students who have been accepted to accredited medical, dental, or optometry schools be- 
fore completing the requirements for an undergraduate degree at Oakwood College may be 
awarded a Bachelor of Science in Natural Sciences upon successful completion of the first 12 
months of medical, dental, or optometry studies provided the following conditions are met: 

1 . Three years are completed in an accredited undergraduate program of which at least the 
last year is taken in residence at Oakwood College. 

2. The general education requirements for a bachelor's degree are taken at Oakwood Col- 
lege. 

3. Proof is provided from a professional school of medicine, dentistry, or optometry of suc- 



59 



cessful completion of the required 12 months at the respective professional school. 
The B.S. in Natural Sciences is the only degree awarded to such students regardless of their 
specific major pursued while in undergraduate school. Students who wish to apply for this 
degree must do so in writing to the chair of the Department of Biological Sciences by January 1 . 

Major Requirements: 

Bl 131-132 General Biology 8 hours 

Bl 321 Genetics 3 hours 

Bl Electives 8 or 9 hours 

MA 171 Calculus (MA 121-122 may be required first) or 
MA 21 1 Survey of Calculus 

(MA 121-122 may be required first) 3 or 4 hours 

PH 103-104 General Physics 8 hours 

CH 141-142 General Chemistry 8 hours 

CH 311- 312 Organic Chemistry (with laboratory) 8 hours 

Total 47 hours 

General education requirements variation: 
Omit one religion elective course. 

Minor In Biology 

Bl 131-132 General Biology 8 hours 

Bl 230 Plant Biology 3 hours 

Bl Electives (upper division) 8 hours 

Total 19 hours 

The MBRS Program 

The National Institutes of Health has approved a Minority Biomedical Research Support 
Program grant for Oakwood College, and the department is awaiting funding to start up this 
program. Depending on the receipt of funds, about six to eight students will be granted annual 
tuition and fees scholarships. 

Description of Courses 

811 01 , 1 02 The Life Sciences 3-3 hours 

This course is designed for nonscience majors. It is a basic study of biological principles 
involving various plants and animals. A major objective is the presentation of the concept of 
man in his biological background, as well as his environments and his responsibility to it. 

Bl 111-112 Human Anatomy and Physiology 3-3 hours 

This course is designed for those not majoring in the biological sciences such as nursing and 
allied health majors. It is a basic study of the structure and function of the human organism, 
including the cells, tissues, organs, and organ systems. Three hours of laboratory are re- 
quired each week. Does not apply toward a major or minor in biology. 

Bl 1 31 -1 32 General Biology 4-4 hours 

A study of the fundamentals of living organisms with emphasis on zoology and botany and 
their biochemistry, physiology, genetics, systematics, behavior, and ecology. Three hours of 
laboratory are required each week. 

60 



Bl 201 , 202 Principles of Environmental Science 3,3 hours 

A course designed to study the applications of ecological principles to human activities from a 
global perspective. Current class discussions deal with contemporary environmental issues, 
maintaining a sustainable environment, and developing positive environmental ethics. The 
laboratory period also includes field trips, guest speakers, films, debates, and more in-depth 
discussions of specific current issues. May be applied to general education science require- 
ment for nonscience majors and to meet certain state education requirements. 

Bl 204 Introduction to Research 1 hour 

This course is designed to provide the student with the opportunity to study various methods 
and techniques related to and/or necessary for the development of a research protocol. The 
student will prepare a research proposal, which will form the basis for his/her undergraduate 
research. Directed study. Prerequisites: Bl 132, CH 142, and MA 21 1 or MA 171 . 

Bl 221 Microbiology 4 hours 

The nature of bacteria and disease-producing organisms with their habits and methods of 
reproduction and the relationship of these organisms to disease in the human body are stud- 
ied. Three hours of laboratory are required each week. Does not apply toward a major or 
minor in Biology. Prerequisite: Bl 112 

Bl 225 Embryology 3 hours 

This is a study of the embryonic development of animals, with emphasis on the developmental 
morphology of vertebrates. Three hours of laboratory are required each week. Prerequisite: 
Bl 132. 

Bl 230 Plant Biology 3 hours 

A study of the phylogeny, structure, reproduction, and photosynthesis, beginning with simple 
unicellular and proceeding through various levels of complexity to the flowering plant. Three 
hours of laboratory are required each week. Prerequisite: Bl 132. 

Bl 241 General Microbiology 4 hours 

A study of microorganisms as they affect our environment, their relationship to disease in 
man, plants, and animals, microbial metabolism and genetics, symbiotic associations, and the 
control of microorganisms, where needed. Three hours of laboratory are required each 
week. Prerequisites: Bl 132 and CH 142. 

Bl 31 6 Biological Instrumentation 2 hours 

This course is intended to introduce students to a variety of laboratory instrument and experi- 
mental techniques used in some classical experiments that played key roles in the develop- 
ment of modern understanding of the field of biological science. One hour lecture and one 
hour laboratory demonstration per week. Prerequisites: Bl 1 32, CH 1 42, and MA 21 1 or MA 
171. 

Bl 321 Genetics 3 hours 

A study of principles of inheritance in all living organisms will be undertaken. Classical, 
molecular, and non-Mendelian genetics will be studied. Three hours of laboratory are re- 
quired each week. Prerequisites: Bl 1 32 and CH 31 2 or Bl 241 and CH 31 1 . 



Bl 323 Undergraduate Research 1 hour 

Directed independent research in an approved area. Topics must be chosen, discussed, and 
approved by the instructor at least one semester prior to the initiation of the study. Prerequi- 
site: Bl 204 

61 



Bl 331 Histology 3 hours 

The student will undertake the study of the microscopic anatomy of vertebrate tissues and 
organs, including references to their functions. Three hours of laboratory are required each 
week. Prerequisite: Bl 132. 

Bl 380 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy 3 hours 

A study of the comparative anatomy of the chordates, with emphasis on the vertebrates. 
Detailed dissections of the shark, necturus, and cat are made in the laboratory. Three hours 
of laboratory are required each week. Prerequisite: Bl 132. 

Bl 401 -402 Biology Seminar) 1 -1 hours 

Oral and written reports on both historical and current biological work as found in the biologi- 
cal literature. The student is expected to become familiar with some significant contributors 
(both past and present) in a selected field chosen by the student. During the second semes- 
ter, the instructor will assign topical readings to the student, and students will be required to 
present an oral and a written report of the assigned readings. Prerequisites: Bl 132 and 
senior standing or permission of the instructor. 

Bl 41 5 Biostatistics 2 hours 

This is an introductory course on probability theory and statistics. Special emphasis is given 
to biological applications for sampling, tests of central tendency and dispersion, and experi- 
mental design. Prerequisites: MA 21 1 or MA 171 . 

Bl 422-423 General Physiology 3-3 hours 

This course is a study of the function, interaction, and regulation of the major organ systems 
of the human body, with emphasis on biochemical and biophysical processes. Three hours of 
laboratory are required each week. Prerequisites: Bl 132, CH 312, and PH 104. 

Bl 425 General Ecology 3 hours 

A study of the interrelationships between organisms and their environment will be undertaken. 
Laboratories and field trips are designed to introduce the student to techniques used in basic 
ecological research. Three hours of laboratory are required each week. Prerequisites: Bl 
132. 

Bl 430 Philosophy of Science (W) 2 hours 

A careful, critical study and discussion of both biblical and scientific evidence on origins. 
Particular emphasis will be given to rational, philosophical, and theological insights as a basis 
for arriving at a comprehensive understanding of the origins of all things. Prerequisites: Bl 
1 32 and senior standing or permission of the instructor. 

Bl 440 Parasitology 3 hours 

A study of the parasitic forms of protozoan, helminthes, and arthropods, their life cycles, 
controls, and economical, social, and health significance. Three hours of laboratory are 
required each week. Prerequisite: Bl 241 . 

Bl 451 Special Topics in Biology 2 hours 

The instructor, on approval of the department chair, at the time of registration will specify the 
special topics and prerequisites. Topics include, but are not limited to, contemporary issues 
in basic biology and biomedical fields such as preventive oncology, neurobiology, plant pa- 
thology, environmental pollution, gene therapy, and global ecology. Prerequisites: Bl 132 and 
senior standing. 



Bl 455 Immunology 3 hours 

This course is a study of the function of the immune system and its response to antigens, 
allergens, and self-molecules. Both the humoral and cell-associated systems will be studied. 
Three hours of laboratory are required each week. Prerequisites: Bl 241, Bl 321, and CH 
312. 

Bl 460 Cellular and Molecular Biology (W) 3 hours 

This course entails a study of cell ultrastructure and physiology as related to the metabolic 
and functional capabilities of cells. The structure and properties of macromolecules will be 
studied. Three hours of laboratory are required each week. Prerequisites: Bl 321 and CH 
312. 

Bl 471 Molecular Genetics 3 hours 

A study of genetics at the molecular level, with emphasis on the interaction of genes, the 
mechanisms of gene expression and their control, gene mutations and the modes of genetic 
material repair. Genome mapping and methods ,of studying genomes will be scrutinized. 
Three hours of laboratory are required each week. Prerequisites: Bl 321 and CH 312. 

Bl 481 -482 Mammalian Anatomy I, II 4-4 hours 

Regional human anatomy with emphasis on cadver dissection. Primarily for pre-medical and 
pre-dental students. Mammalian Anatomy I covers the upper lim, thorax, and abdomen; Mam- 
malian Anatomy II covers the pelvis and perineum, lower limb, head and neck. It is suggested 
that courses be taken in sequence. Exceptions will be made for dental students in their last 
semester. Prerequisites: senior status with GPA of 3.0 or better in the sciences, Bl 225, Bl 
380 or permission of instructor. 

Bl 484 Mycology 3 hours 

The study of fungi — their morphology, physiology, social, and economic importance— is un- 
dertaken in this course. Three hours of laboratory are required each week. Prerequisite: Bl 
241 . Offered alternate years. 



Bl 490-491 Research and Independent Study 1-1 hour 

The laboratory or field project must be chosen following consultation with a faculty member 
who will help the student in preparing the research protocol to be approved by the department's 
research committee. A minimum of six hours per week in laboratory or fieldwork is required. 
Approval of the research topic by both the instructor and the research committee must be 
completed prior to registration for this course. Laboratory or field performance, a written 
report, and an oral presentation of the findings to the entire faculty will determine course 
grade. Prerequisites: Bl 132, cumulative GPA of at least 3.00 in science and nonscience 
subjects, consent of the instructor, and approval of the research topic by the department's 
research committee at least one semester before research is initiated. 



Department of Business and information 
Systems 



Professors: 
Associate Professors: 
Assistant Professors: 



l\/lajors: 



Anderson, Price 

Brathwaite, Gill, Selassie (Interim Chair) 

Billingy, Burton, Duncanson, Gunn, Jacobs, McRoy 

Roper 

Accounting (A. S., B.S.) 
Business Administration (B.B.A.) 

Emphasis in: Administrative Systems Management, Health Care 

Administration, Management, Marketing 
Business Education (B.S.) 
Computer Information Systems (A.S. and B.S.) 
Finance (B.S.) 
Organizational Management (B.S.) 



IVIinors: 



Accounting 

Computer Information Systems 

Finance 

Management 



Purpose 

The purpose of the Department of Business and Information Systems is to provide each student 
with a broad base of conceptual, technical, and human skills as they relate to the principles, practices, 
and ethics of business. The goals of the department are: to provide the student with relevant basic 
skills in the functional areas of business; to assist in the development of a Christian philosophy; to 
encourage preparation for entry into positions of responsibility of government, industry, the 
community, and the church; to avail all students with technical skills in the area of computer literacy; 
and to provide a foundation for students choosing to pursue graduate degrees. 

Accreditation 



Oakwood College, through its Business and Information Systems Department, is nationally 
accredited by the Association of Collegiate Business Schools and Programs to offer the following 
business degree: The Bachelor of Science (B.S.), with majors in Accounting, Computer Information 
Systems, Finance, Health Care Administration, Office Systems Management, Management, and 
Marketing. The Business Education program is accredited by the National Council for Accreditation 
of Teacher Education (NCATE). 

Application for Admission 

To be admitted as a major in the Department of Business and Information Systems, students 
must have completed at least 30 hours of course work, including EN 1 1 2 Freshman Composition, 
and have an overall minimum GPA of 2.00. 

Any Business and Information Systems courses taken without prior satisfactory completion 
of all catalog prerequisite courses will not be counted toward fulfillment of graduation require- 
ments. 



Exit Examinations 

All majors in the Business and Information Systems Department are required to take a written 
exit examination, administered during the spring semesterof the student'ssenioryear, and pass with 
a minimum score of 70 percent. 



Baclielor's Degrees 

The following core courses are required of all business students as part of their major. 

Business Core Curriculum: 

AC 220-221 Principles of Accounting 6 hours 

BA 302 Business Communications 3 hours 

BA 310 Principles of Management 3 hours 

BA 371 Production Management* 3 hours 

BA 375 Business Law 3 hours 

BA 460 Business Ethics 3 hours 

BA 495 Business Policy 3 hours 

EC 282 Principles of Microeconomics 3 hours 

EC 283 Principles of Macroeconomics 3 hours 

FN 31 1 Principles of Finance 3 hours 

IS 231 Information Systems in the Organization** 3 hours 

MA 171 Calculus (MA121-122 may be required first) 4 hours 

MA 321 Statistics 3 hours 

MK 301 Principles of Marketing 3 hours 

Total 46 hours 

*Not needed by computer information systems majors 
**Not needed by accounting majors. 

Bachelor of Science in Accounting 

This degree is designed to offer an institutional program with an emphasis on the principles and 
concepts of accounting relating to measuring, recording, classifying, summarizing, and interpreting 
financial transactions. It prepares students for accounting careers in business, government, not- 
for-profit organizations, and graduate school. 

Major Requirements: 

Business Core Curriculum 43 hours 

AC 325-326 Intermediate Accounting 6 hours 

AC 341 Cost Accounting 3 hours 

AC 350 Individual Taxation or AC 440 Contemp. Issues in Ace* 3 hours 

AC 351 Corporate Taxation 3 hours 

AC 420 Governmental and Non-Profit Accounting 3 hours 

AC 421 Advanced Accounting 3 hours 



AC 430 Accounting Information Systems 3 hours 

AC 431 Auditing 3 hours 

Total .70 hours 

*Students on the CPA tract must also take AC 451 CPA Review. 



Bachelor of Business Administration 

This is a professional degree, with concentrations in Administrative Systems Management, 
Health Care Administration, Management, and Marketing. 

Major Requirements: 

Business Core Curriculum 46 hours 

Concentration in Administrative Systems Management, Health Care 

Administration, Management, or Marketing* 18-21 hours 

Total 64-67 hours 

* Administrative Systems Management concentration: 

This concentration is designed to prepare competent organizational systems personnel for 
careers as executive office systems managers in business, industry, and government. Graduates 
will be prepared to assume major administrative and supervisory duties in the electronic office. 

AS 203 Software Tools for Personal Productivity 3 hours 

AS 305 Information Technology for Competitive Advantage 3 hours 

AS 320 Information Resource Management 3 hours 

IS 31 1 Advanced Programming of Business Systems 3 hours 

IS 335 Modern Database Design and Implementation 3 hours 

IS 350 Web-Based Programming 3 hours 

AS 450 Telecommunications and Distributed Processing 3 hours 

Total 21 hours 

General Education Variation 

Students are required to take AS 1 00 Computer Application and AS 203 Software Tools for 
Personal Productivity and receive a minimum grade of C in both. 

*Health Care Administration concentration: 

This concentration provides a broad understanding of health care management and hands-on 
experience in applying learned principles. It is designed for those persons interested in a career 
in health care administration. Graduates will be prepared for careers in health care organizations, 
including hospitals, public agencies, health care networks, group practices, long-term care, and 
managed-care settings. 

HC 325 Introduction of Health Services Administration 3 hours 

HC 330 Legal Aspects and Ethics of Health Care 3 hours 

HC 454 Long Term Care Administration 3 hours 



HC 495 Health Services Management Problenns and Research 3 hours 

HC 497 Practicum in Health Care Management 3 hours 

FN 41 1 Insurance and Risk Management 3 hours 

Total 18 hours 

*Management concentration : 

This concentration focuses on people and productivity. Management is the process of planning , 
organizing, leading, and controlling the efforts of organizational members, of making decisions, and 
of using all other organizational resou rces to achieve stated organizational goals. Students learn how 
to be productive managers in theirstudy of such fundamental professional skills as leadership, team 
building, project coordination, performance evaluation, resource allocation, and strategy formula- 
tion. 

BA 383 Human Resource Management 3 hours 

BA 385 International Business 3 hours 

BA 41 5 Organizational Behavior 3 hours 

BA 487 Negotiations 3 hours 

BA 488 Leadership and Organizational Climate 3 hours 

AC 330 Managerial Accounting 3 hours 

FN 401 Financial Decision-Making 3 hours 

Total 21 hours 

^Marketing concentration: 

This concentration emphasizes the facilitation of exchanges between one business and 
another, as well as between businesses and consumers. Key marketing activities include designing 
and modifying products, pricing, selling, and sales management, and gathering market information. 
Career opportunities include sales, retail management and buying, advertising account executives, 
and marketing research associates. 

MK 342 Marketing Research 3 hours 

MK 343 Consumer Behavior 3 hours 

MK 345 Advertising Management 3 hours 

MK 350 Sales Management 3 hours 

MK 448 International Marketing 3 hours 

MK 478 Contemporary Marketing Issues 3 hours 

Total 18 hours 



Bachelor of Science in Business Education 

This program qualifies a person to teach business-related subjects at the secondary level. 
After graduation, students may apply for the Alabama Class B Certificate: Business Education, 
grades 7-1 2; and the SDA Basic Teaching Certificate: Business Education, grades 7-12. 

Refer to the Department of Education section in this bulletin for the program outline. Program 
advisor: S. Price 



Bachelor of Science in Computer Information Systems 

The Computer Information Systems (IS) major is designed to prepare a student for a career in 
information systems. At the bachelor's level, the most common entry points for graduates of the 
program are likely to be for positions of programmer-analyst, system support, consulting, and 
software services. There is a high demand for individuals with a combined knowledge of applied 
computing, computerapplications, and business. The IS major is designed to meet this demand by 
providing students with the necessary educational background. 

Graduates of IS programs will have a combined preparation in business core courses and 
applied computing. They will not only have the necessary managerial talentto solve business problems 
in functional areas such as accounting, finance, marketing, and management but also technical talent 
to develop and support informations systems with a varying degree of scope. 

Major Requirements: 

Business Core Curriculum 46 hours 

IS 211 Fundamentals of Systems Development 3 hours 

IS 270 Digital Computing and Logic 3 hours 

IS 280 Programming of Business Systems in C 3 hours 

IS 31 1 Advanced Programming of Business Systems in C++ 3 hours 

IS 330 Systems Analysis Methods 3 hours 

IS 335 Modern Database Design and Implementation 3 hours 

IS341 Management of Business Networks 3 hours 

IS 350 Web-Based Programming 3 hours 

IS 410 Object-oriented Programming for Information Systems 3 hours 

IS 420 Project Management for Information Systems 3 hours 

Total 76 hours 



Bachelor of Science in Finance 

This degree focuses on the financial sectors of modern economics. Students are provided with 
the needed analytical foundations and with an introduction to financial processes and institutions. 
Graduates majoring in finance find employment with manufacturing, retail, and service firms; 
financial institutions such as banks, insurance companies, and brokerage firms; and with government 
agencies. 

Major Requirements: 

Business Core Curriculum 46 hours 

FN 321 Money, Banking, and Capital 3 hours 

FN 381 Investments 3 hours 

FN 401 Financial Decision-Making and Theory 3 hours 

FN 41 1 Insurance and Risk Management 3 hours 

FN 426 Financial Markets and Institutions 3 hours 

FN 436 Management of Financial Institutions 3 hours 

FN 481 Portfolio Management and Security Analysis 3 hours 

FN 486 International Finance 3 hours 

Total 70 hours 



Bachelor of Science in Organizational Management 

This degree program is designed specifically for the adult learner and offered in a nontradi 
tional format. Refer to the Adult and Continuing Education section of the bulletin for the pro- 
gram outline and description of courses. 



Associate of Science in Accounting 

The purpose of this degree is to provide those students who for various reasons do not acquire 
afour-year degree an opportunity to develop enough competence in a specific area to obtain gainful 
employment. 

Major Requirements: 

AC 220-221 Principles of Accounting 6 hours 

AC 325-326 Intermediate Accounting 6 hours 

AC 341 Cost Accounting 3 hours 

AC 351 Corporate Taxation 3 hours 

BA 302 Business Communications 3 hours 

BA 310 Principles of Management 3 hours 

EC 282 Principles of Microeconomics 3 hours 

Total 27 hours 



Associate of Science in Computer Information Systems 

The purpose of this degree is to provide those students who for various reasons do not acquire 
afour-year degree an opportunity to develop enough competence in a specific area to obtain gainful 
employment. 

Major Requirements: 

IS 21 1 Fundamentals of Systems Development 3 hours 

IS 231 Information Systems in the Organization 3 hours 

IS 270 Digital Computing and Logic 3 hours 

IS 280 Programming of Business Systems in C 3 hours 

IS 330 Systems Analysis Methods 3 hours 

IS 335 Modern Database Design and Implementation 3 hours 

IS 341 Management of Business Networks 3 hours 

AC 220 Principles of Accounting I 3 hours 

BA 310 Principles of Management 3 hours 

Total 27 hours 



Minor in Accounting 

AC 220-221 Principles of Accounting 6 hours 

AC 325-326 Intermediate Accounting 6 hours 

ACEIectives 9 hours 

Total 21 hours 

Minor in Computer Information Systems 

IS 21 1 Fundamentals of Systems Development 3 hours 

IS 231 Information Systems in the Organization 3 hours 

IS 270 Digital Computing and Logic 3 hours 

IS 280 Programming of Business Systems in C 3 hours 

IS 330 Systems Analysis Methods 3 hours 

IS 341 Management of Business Networks 3 hours 

Total 18 hours 

Minor in Finance (for Business Majors Only) 

FN 321 Money, Banking, and Capital 3 hours 

FN 381 Investments 3 hours 

FN 401 Financial Decision-Making and Theory 3 hours 

FN 411 Insurance and Risk Management 3 hours 

FN 426 Financial Markets and Institutions 3 hours 

FN 486 International Finance 3 hours 

FN Elective 3 hours 

Total 21 hours 

Minor in Management 

BA310 Principles of Management 3 hours 

BA 383 Human Resource Management 3 hours 

BA Electives (6 hours must be upper division) 9 hours 

AC 220-221 Principles of Accounting 6 hours 

Total 21 hours 



Description of Courses 
Accounting 



AC 220-221 Principles of Accounting l-ll 3-3 hours 

This course presents fundamental accounting concepts, theories, and procedures. Both 
accounting principles and practice are emphasized so that students can obtain an understand- 
ing of the sources of financial information and the uses of such information. Lab required. 

AC 325-326 Intermediate Accounting l-ll 3-3 hours 

Further in-depth analysis and discussion of intermediate financial accounting theories, con- 
cepts, and procedures. Emphasis is also placed on recent developments in accounting 
evaluation and reporting practices. The course material is preparatory for the CPA examina- 
tion. Lab required. Prerequisite: AC 221. 



AC 330 Managerial Accounting 3 hours 

This course is designed to show students how accounting can help to solve problenns that confront 
those who are directly responsible for the management of an enterprise. Students learn to 
interpret and apply accounting data in planning and controlling business activity. Lab required. 
Lab required. Prerequisite: AC 221. 

AC 341 Cost Accounting 3 liours 

Emphasis is placed on the determination and control of costs. Students learn to assemble and 
interpret cost data for the use of management in controlling current operations and planning for 
the future. The course presents the theory and practice for job order, process, and standard 
cost systems. Prerequisite: AC 221 . 

AC 350 Individual Taxation 3 hours 

This course is an analysis of the federal income tax law as it applies to individuals and a survey 
of the law applicable to new regulations, cases, and tax issues. Prerequisite: AC 326. 

AC 351 Corporate Taxation 3 hours 

This course is an analysis of partnership and corporate tax laws and an introduction to tax 
research and planning as a means of gaining an understanding of the role of tax practitioner. 
Prerequisite: AC 326. 

AC 420 Governmental and Non-Profit Accounting 3 hours 

A thorough study of the accounting principles and practices involved in budgeting, recording, 
and reporting for state and local governments, hospitals, colleges/universities, and voluntary 
and welfare organizations. Prerequisite: AC 326. 

AC 421 Advanced Accounting 3 hours 

Emphasizes financial accounting concepts utilized in business combinations, the preparation 
of consolidated financial statements, accounting for investments, branch accounting, seg- 
ments and interim reporting, foreign transactions, corporate reorganizations and liquidations, 
and consignment transactions. Accounting for partnerships will also be covered. Prerequisite: 
AC 326. 

AC 430 Accounting Information Systems 3 hours 

Students will learn about the accounting system as an information system. Computer-related 
issues and controls should be identified, discussed, and integrated in the overall discussion of 
accounting concepts, principles, and controls. Prerequisite: AS 100. 

AC 431 Auditing 3 hours 

The purpose of this course is to help the student to understand the auditing part of the work 
of the public accountant, and to help him/her apply the methods and procedures followed in 
conducting an audit for a small or medium-sized concern. The procedures for the effective 
auditing of cash, receivables, inventories, other assets, liabilities, and proprietorship are 
studied with an above-average degree of care. The procedures to be followed in carrying out 
detailed audit systems are also considered in the course. Prerequisite: AC 421 . 



AC 440 Contemporary Issues in Accounting 3 hours 

This is an integrative accounting course covering real-world cases drawn from financial 
accounting, tax, cost, auditing, ethics, and information systems. It emphasizes the environ- 
ment of the accounting profession, professionalism, and interaction between accounting 
principles and the management policy process. Current developments and emerging issues 



in accounting are discussed. Problems encountered in accounting practice will be integrated 
in the course. Case studies will be utilized throughout the course. Writing and oral 
communication skills are heavily utilized. Prerequisites: AC 341 , 351 , 421 , and 431 . 

AC 451 CPA Review 3 hours 

Intensive practice in the application of accounting theory to problems of the caliber contained 
in CPA examinations. Prerequisite.- permission of the instructor. 



Administrative Systems l\/lanagement 



AS 100 Computer Applications 3 hours 

This course is designed to give students basic computer concepts and practical experience in 
the use of the computer. Using software applications packages such as word processing, 
electronic spreadsheets, graphics, and database management, students will learn to input and 
output data useful in professional and personal pursuits. Prerequisite: One year of high school 
typingor AS 120. 

AS 1 20 Keyboarding 1 -2 hours 

Development of alphanumeric touch skills. The course is taught on terminal keyboards using 
a software program that is correlated to the textbook. Students may progress at their own rate. 
Skill in speed and accuracy is emphasized. This is a service course. 

AS 203 Software Tools for Personal Productivity 3 hours 

This course introduces students to the concepts of information processing using computer 
technology. An overview of computer hardware and software is presented. Microcomputers, 
disk operating system, and Windows operating environments are explored in some detail. 
Intermediate and advanced concepts of word processing, spreadsheets, and database 
processing are required using the Microsoft Office suite of software. The World Wide Web is also 
integrated with application problems. Once these skills are mastered, students are taught 
computer-based business problem solving. As a part of the course, students are expected to 
use personal computers, demonstrate competency in Windows, and solve business problems 
using Excel and Access. Prerequisite: AS 100 

AS 305 Information Technology for Competitive Advantage 3 hours 

Students will be exposed to the changing world of information technology in national and 
multinational organizations. The role of information technology in securing competitive 
advantage for organizations will be introduced in an environment that combines conceptual 
lessons in building an e-business with hands-on exercises. Students will explore Internet 
technologies in relationship to web site development, and be exposed to software that 
facilitates web site management and deployment. It is expected that students will work 
individually and in groups to design web based forms and a full commercial web site. 
Prerequisite: IS 203 

AS 320 Information Resource Management 3 hours 

A study of electronic, micrographic, and paper information resources for organizations, 
including the systems used to classify, store, retrieve, protect, and preserve records. Planning 
systems that control the creation of information, store and retrieve information from active 
records, and dispose of inactive information. Prerequisite: junior standing. 



AS 450 Telecommunications and Distributed Processing 3 hours 

Examines the technology, organization, and operations of teleconnnnunication and distributed 
data processing systems. Topics to be discussed include hardware/software facilities, 
transmission systems, system design considerations, and distributed system configurations. 
Business functions and case studies will be used to illustrate the application of telecommuni- 
cation and distributed processing technology. Prerequisite: IS 335 

AS 499 Office Internship 3-6 hours 

A work experience program offered in cooperation with business and industry to provide on- 
the-job training intended to bridge theoretical concepts with practical application. Credit hours 
earned depend on the length of the practicum. Three credit hours are granted for practicums 
of 1 00 hours; six credit hours, for 200 hours. All internships require one class meeting per week 
with instructor. Internships must be applied for prior to placement. Prerequisite: BA 310 and 
junior standing. 



Management 



BA 1 00 Principles of Business Mathematics 3 hours 

This course is a basic math review that is designed to help students acquire computation skills 
required in the office. Through a variety of business-oriented exercises and realistic consumer 
and job applications, students explore the important role math plays on the job. Contents 
include: mathematics of accounting and records management, mathematics of financial and 
office management, mathematics of marketing and retailing, and the metric (SI) system. 
Offered alternate years. 

BA 101 Business English 3 hours 

Business English offers a thorough coverage of the principles of grammar, punctuation, 
capitalization, spelling, usage, and style. Required of all business students falling below 1 4 on 
the English ACT. 

BA 105 Introduction to Business 3 hours 

Introduction to Business offers an introduction to the principles and practices of business and 
an overview of the functional areas. 

BA 302 Business Communication (W) 3 hours 

Theory, practices, and techniques essential to external and organization communications; 
development of skill in presenting oral and written communications. Prerequisite: BA101 or 
a minimum of 14 on the English portion of the ACT. 



BA 31 Principles of Management 3 hours 

This is an introductory course designed to familiarize students with the knowledge, roles, 
responsibilities, and skills required of modern managers. Prerequisites: sophomore standing. 

BA 371 Production/Operations Management 3 hours 

Creative management of the production and operation function of the organization can lead to 
competitive advantage. This course examines what production and operations managers do, 
as well as investigates the latest tools and concepts they use to support key decisions. 
Prerequisites: BA 310 and junior standing. 



BA 375 Business Law (W) 3 hours 

This course is designed to familiarize the student with the fundamental principles of the laws 
of business so they act intelligently and understand their rights, duties, and inabilities in 
ordinary business transactions. Contracts, bailment, sales, creditors' rights and bankruptcy, 
and agency and employment relationships are covered. Emphasis is given to the Uniform 
Commercial Code. Prerequisites: junior standing. 

BA 383 Human Resource Management 3 hours 

A study of the issues, trends, and problems involved in the strategic management of personnel 
including recruitment, motivation, evaluation, compensation, and employee development. 
Prerequisites: BA 31 and junior standing. 

BA 385 International Business 3 hours 

A study of the international business environment, with emphasis on commercial policies and 
treaties, export/import operations, government regulations affecting international business, 
internal international business activities, and study of cultural issues. Prerequisites: EC 281 , 
EC 282, and BA 310 

BA 41 5 Organizational Behavior 3 hours 

People are the common denominator of all organizational endeavors, regardless of organiza- 
tional size or purpose. This course examines theory and research regarding the behavior of 
individuals and groups in organizations. Topics include motivation, communication, group 
dynamics and decision making, leadership, and organizational change. Prerequisites: BA 31 
and junior standing. 

BA 460 Business Ethics 3 hours 

Emphasis is placed on the ethical concepts that are relevant to resolving moral and legal issues 
in business, the reasoning and analytical skills needed to apply ethical concepts to business 
decisions, and the social and natural environments within which moral issues in business arise. 
Prerequisites: BA 310 and junior standing. 

BA 487 Negotiations 3 hours 

This course focuses on the problems and possibilities of effectively negotiating workable 
agreements in organizational and interpersonal situations. Emphasis is placed on intellectual 
understanding and practical skills in everyday business negotiations. Cases and exercises are 
used to build skills in thinking strategically and analytically when negotiating organizational 
problems. Prerequisites: BA 310 and junior standing. 

BA 488 Leadership and Organizational Change 3 hours 

This course examines the knowledge and skills relevant to the development of appropriate 
leadership behavior in various organizational contexts as well as effective influence in 
interpersonal relations. Prerequisites: BA 31 and junior standing. 

BA 490-491 Research and Independent Study 1-3 hours each 

This course is designed to allow students to participate in supervised directed research on 
practical organizational issues. Prerequisites: Consent of the department chair and senior 
standing. 

BA 492-493 Business Practicum - Internship 1 -3 hours each 

Leading corporations throughout the country have established summer internship programs that 
provide opportunity for gaining real-life experience to those who participate. The criteria for 



74 



applying for these internships vary f ronn company to company and must be applied for through 
the department. Students may gain up to 3 hours credit for each internship in which they 
participate provided they make application prior to participating in the program. A notebook on 
experience gained and an evaluation by the corporate supervisor is required. 

BA 495 Business Policy and Strategy (W) 3 hours 

This course is designed to develop an understanding of policy formation and strategic planning 
as related to current business practices. Integration of business fundamentals (marketing, 
finance, accounting, production, economics) into a balanced analysis of the whole business 
system is emphasized. Open to seniors only. 



Computer Information Systems 

IS 21 1 Fundamentals of Systems Development 3 hours 

Introduction to computer programming for Business and IS students. No previous experience 
and knowledge of programming are required. Visual Basic is used to teach solid programming 
concepts and practices. Topics include variables and their types, control structures, flow control , 
controls for graphical-user-interfaces, event-driven programming, file and database processing 
using MS Access, and the application development cycle. Prerequisite: AS 1 00. 

IS 231 Information Systems in the Organization 3 hours 

Students are introduced to the use of information systems and technology in organizations, 
including the manner in which these add value to organizational processes and products. 
Topics covered include concepts of decision-making, role of information systems, typology of 
systems, hardware and software, and management or organizational support systems. 
Students would be expected to analyze cases, use computerized tools such as decision 
support features of Excel, HTML for Web pages and electronic commerce. Prerequisite: AS 
100. 

IS 270 Digital Computing and Logic 3 hours 

Numbersystems: binary, octal, hexadecimal; number base conversion, arithmetic and different 
bases; complement number systems; one's, two's, nine's, ten's complements; COMPUTER 
DATA REPRESENTATION. Introduction to Boolean Algebra, Venn diagrams, Karnaugh maps 
and truth tables; introduction to gates and synthesis of simple switching circuits and decision 
tables and flowchart logic. Prerequisite: IS 21 1 . 

IS 280 Programming of Business Systems In C 3 hours 

An introduction to ANSI C programming is presented. Concepts are explained in a clear, 
understandable manner using modern business applications. Important programming defini- 
tions, concepts, and rules are addressed. Upon completion of the course, students will be 
proficient in designing, coding, debugging, testing, and distributing applications. Coding of 
applications will include but not be limited to detailed descriptions of algorithms to perform 
common programming tasks such as sorting, searching, and hashing. Prerequisite: IS 211 . 

IS 31 1 Advanced Programming of Business Systems in C++ 3 hours 

C++ concepts and rules are explained in a clear, understandable manner and applied to 
modern business applications. Important programming definitions, concepts, and rules are 
addressed. Students should enterthe course with a strong C programming background as this 
course will focus on such object-oriented elements of C++ as classes, methods, constructors, 
overloaded functions and operations, templates, virtual functions and the STL. Prerequisite: 
IS 280. 



75 



IS 330 Systems Analysis Methods 3 hours 

This course introduces the student to the techniques of developing an Information system. 
Students will study the system life cycle, system analysis methodologies, data analysis 
techniques, system design, joint application design, rapid application design, and an overview 
of object-oriented systems. Students are also expected to use a CASE tool to develop a 
system specification. Prerequisite: IS 231 . 

IS 335 Modern Database Design and Implementation 3 hours 

This course provides an in-depth discussion of the new tools and technologies that are shaping 
modern database management. Detailed coverage of client/server and distributed databases, 
including trends toward architectural downsizing, redefining the role of mainframes, the 
increased emphasis on LANs, and end-user computing. Case studies are used to illustrate the 
role of database analysis and design concepts In the total systems development process. The 
student will become proficient in the utilization of Oracle and Microsoft-Access database 
management systems. Prerequisite: IS 31 1 . 

IS 341 Management of Business Networks 3 hours 

This course Introduces the managerial and technical aspects of business networks, including 
the hardware and software mechanisms that allow access from one computer to files and 
services provided on other computers. An overview of local area nets (LAN) and Wide Area 
Nets (WAN) is provided, as also those of software protocols, routers, bridges, and firewalls. On 
the practical side, the student will learn about the network services provided by the operating 
system (Windows/NT), network analyzers, and the management of security and reliability. The 
student will also learn to install, configure, and test network hardware/software, and use such 
facilities in practical applications, including e-mail, remote file access, client/server hook-ups, 
and dial-up networking. Prerequisite: IS 31 1 

IS 350 Web-Based Programming 3 hours 

This course covers web publishing and web-based applications development, with emphasis in 
accessing remote database Information. Web site design concepts and tools are introduced, 
includlngActive-HTML, CGI, SGML, VRML, and multimedia presentation. A survey of scripting 
languages for the web Includes Perl, VBScript, Jscrlpt, and JavaScript. The goal is to prepare 
students with skills for designing, creating, programming, publishing, and developing applica- 
tions on the web. Prerequisite: IS 335 

IS 41 Object-Oriented Programming for Information Systems 3 hours 

The concepts of object-oriented methodologies and programming are presented and reinforced 
through the Java and the C++ programming languages. Language syntax, error handling, object 
creation/destruction and memory allocation strategies are explored. Java GUI components, 
event handling, and Web-based programming are Introduced. Prerequisite: IS 31 1 

IS 420 Project Management for Information Systems 3 hours 

This course focuses on models used In a software development project. Including tools that 
Improve project productivity. Topics Include concepts of project management, task schedul- 
ing, cost estimation models, risk assessment, and software maturity framework. Students will 
be using tools and cases to gain depth In software project management principles and practice. 
Prerequisite: IS 31 1 



76 



Economics 

EC 282 Principles of Microeconomics 3 hours 

An analysis of the basic concepts which describe how individuals choose what to consume and 
how entrepreneurs choose what to produce. The pricing nnechanism and the determination of 
output level in the various market structures. 

EC 283 Principles of Macroeconomics 3 hours 

An analysis of the basic concepts of the national income, including such various components 
as consumption, investment, government expenditures, and the export-import sector. An 
introduction to the general theories of inflation, growth and employment. 



Finance 

FN 31 1 Principles of Finance 3 hours 

Nature and scope of business finance. Emphasis on financial planning, forecasting, and 
analysis, corporate valuation, capital budgeting and risk assessment, cost of capital structure, 
short-term and long-term financial management, and international finance. Prerequisites: AC 
221 and MA 171 

FN 321 Money, Banking, and Capital Markets 3 hours 

An analysis of the interrelated financial system, central banks, private banks, and other 
sources and users of financial capital. Theoretical and empirical policy and institutional issues 
are analyzed using economics and finance methodologies. Topics include the theory of money 
demand and supply. 

FN 381 Investments 3 hours 

Introductory survey course focusing on the process and instruments of investment. Emphasis 
on security market structure, characteristics and valuation of securities, approaches to 
investment analysis, and international investments. Prerequisite: FN 31 1 

FN 401 Financial Decision-Making 3 hours 

Advanced financial management course geared toward the finance major and directed toward 
exploring the linkage between current finance theory and practice. Emphasis on capital 
budgeting theory and techniques, risk adjustment, capital structure and financial policy, and 
mathematical programming approaches to project selection. Prerequisites: FN 31 1 and MA 
171. 

FN 411 Insurance and Risk Management 3 hours 

This course is designed to provide and familiarize students with Insurance and Risk Manage- 
ment processes and methods of treating personal and business risk exposures within the 
corporate and institutional environment. Focus is given to assisting students in becoming more 
efficient consumers of insurance and providing a necessary foundation to those who will 
pursue further study in insurance and related areas. Prerequisite: FN 31 1 . 

FN 426 Financial Markets and Institutions 3 hours 

Develops an understanding of the structure and functioning of our monetary-financial system. 
Emphasis on the institutional process of financial intermediation in the financial marketplace 
and the role that specific institutions and instruments play. Prerequisite: FN 321. 



77 



FN 436 Management of Financial Institutions 3 hours 

Development of fundamental concepts and principles of sound institutional management. 
Includes the financial environment, strategy, performance measures, and asset/liability 
management topics within an overall decision framework. Prerequisite: senior standing. 

FN 481 Portfolio Management and Security Analysis 3 hours 

Rigorous course geared toward the senior finance major. Emphasis on integrating portfolio 
theory with practical approaches to investment analysis and management. Topics include 
efficient diversification and portfolio choice, capital asset pricing theory, arbitrage pricing 
theory, and bondportfolio management, options pricing, and financial futures. Prerequi- 
sites: FN 381 and MA 171. 

FN 486 International Finance 3 hours 

Focus on carrying on business in the framework of the growing field of international finance. 
Exploration of how American business can work with and use international finance in foreign 
manufacturing and marketing operations. Prerequisite: senior standing. 



Health Care Administration 

HC 325 Introduction to Health Services Administration 3 hours 

A broad orientation to the health delivery system. Orientation to the role of the health services 
manager and/or supervisor. Provides organizational theory and practical information about 
health administration. Students will investigate the organizational and environmental contexts 
within which a health manager works. Laboratory is required where students will visit various 
community health facilities. Prerequisite: junior standing. 

HC 330 Legal Aspects and Ethics of Health Care 3 hours 

Presentation of the historical perspectives, current status, and future projections in the field. 
Concepts of corporate liability, malpractice, and professional negligence. Informed consent, 
incident reporting, and the importance of accurate and complete records stressed. Emphasis 
on the prevention rather than the defense of legal actions. Examination of the role of ethics and 
moral decision-making in the everyday life of the health service manager, with special emphasis 
on the various professional codes of ethics. Prerequisite: HC 325. 

HC 454 Long Term Care Administration 3 hours 

This course is designed to familiarize the student with the long-term health care delivery system 
to give the students a working knowledge of the wholistic approach to the care of the elderly 
and long-term care individuals. It will give an overview of some of the emotional and 
physiological needs of individuals who require long-term care. Other areas of concentration 
will be financing, managing, standards, and compliance for quality. Prerequisite: HC 325. 

HC 495 Health Services Management Problems and Research 3 hours 

Seminar type course where selected health service management problems will be identified, 
studied, and evaluated, such as the current and emerging challenges in financing, organizational 
changes, and managerial functions. Prerequisite: HC 330. 

HC 497 Practicum in Human Care Management 3 hours 

An on-the-job experience provided in selected institutions and agencies related to the student's 
career interest. Students obtain firsthand knowledge of the operational world of work by 
devoting full-time effort to observing and participating in the management functions. Depending 



on the student's background and interest, the internship may be in one specific departnnent 
or rotate among many departments. Routine written reports are required. A major 
management project will be completed. Faculty direction provided by telephone and on-site 
visitations. Students return to campus periodically for group sharing of their experiences with 
each other. Students put in a minimum of 250 work hours. Prerequisite: HC 454. 



Marketing 

MK 301 Principles of Marketing 3 hours 

Principles and methods involved in the movement of goods and services from producers to 
consumers; strategies the firm may use to take advantage of market opportunities; how the 
social, political, technological, and economic environments affect these market opportunities. 

MK 342 Marketing Research 3 hours 

Nature and the role of information in the decision-making process; identification and discussion 
ofthe elements and relationships that constitute the research process; planning and conducting 
a research project; the role and nature of a marketing information system. Prerequisites: MK 
301 and MA 321. 

MK 343 Consumer Behavior 3 hours 

This course is intended to help students understand the motivation and behavior of buyers and 
consumers. Consumer behavior will be discussed within a marketing framework and will be 
related to the task of marketing management. Prerequisite: MK 301 

MK 345 Advertising Management 3 hours 

Focuses upon one area of the marketing mix-advertising. Experiential learning is empha- 
sized, and students are required to develop an advertising campaign for a client. Small groups 
form advertising agencies, with students assuming the roles of account executive, creative 
director, research director, media director, and promotion director. Each agency competes 
for the client's account. Prerequisite: MK 342. 

MK 350 Sales Management 3 hours 

A multidisciplinary approach to the study of sales force management. The topic areas of major 
concern focus on the total sales process: selection, training, motivation, and compensation of 
personnel, sales forecasting, sales territory management, and analysis. The basic objectives 
are to provide the student with a management perspective to plan, organize, and direct a sales 
force. Prerequisite: MK 301 . 

MK 448 Global Marketing 3 hours 

This course is designed around the analysis of international marketing competition in the 
foreign market context. The objectives of the course are to provide the student with the 
necessary background to evaluate foreign environments, to evaluate the influence of interna- 
tional marketing competition on the domestic marketing mix, and to design multinational business 
strategies. Prerequisite: MK301. 

MK 478 Contemporary Marketing Issues 3 hours 

A comprehensive survey of current marketing topics of importance to firms and society. 
Individual investigation and reporting emphasized in seminarfashion. Prerequisites: MK301 , 
senior standing, and at least two other marketing courses. 



Department of Chemistry 



Professors: 
Associate Professors: 



Gwebu, LaiHing (Chair) 
Lee-Guey, Ranatunga, Volkov 



Majors: 



Minor: 



Biochemistry (B.S.) 
Chemistry ( B.S.) 
Chemistry Education (B.S.) 
Cytotechnology (B.S.) 
Medical Technology (B.S.) 
Pre-Occupational Therapy ( A.S.) 
Pre-Physical Therapy (A.S.) 
Pre-Physician's Assistant (A.S.) 
Pre-Speech Pathology (A.S.) 

Chemistry 



Purpose 

It is the purpose of the Department of Chemistry to prepare its students for acceptance into 
graduate and professional schools, to provide training required for employment in the laboratories 
of government and industry, and to prepare them for careers in teaching chemistry at the secondary 
level. While pursuing these objectives, the department seeks to offer its students a quality program 
of chemical education that underscores the importance of the liberal arts and nurtures the 
integration of faith and reason. 

It is the purpose of the Allied Health Program to give advice and guidance to students 
considering allied health careers, to aid in the placement of students in the professional schools 
of their choice, and to ensure that they are awarded the degree that follows successful completion 
of the clinical phase of their chosen programs. 

High School Preparation 

Students planning to study chemistry at Oakwood should include as many science and 
mathematics courses as possible in high school, and they should endeavorto make superior grades 
in these courses. The following courses are strongly recommended: Algebra I, Algebra II 
(Precalculus), Geometry, Biology, Chemistry, and Physics. 

Application for Admission 

To be admitted as a major in the Department of Chemistry, students must have completed at 
least 32 hours of course work, including EN 112 Freshman Composition, and have an overall 
minimum GPA of 2.25. 

Exit Examinations 



Chemistry majors will be required to take an exit examination prepared by the American 
Chemical Society that will be administered in the junior year. The examination is designed to 
ascertain the students' general knowledge of the subject areas of general and organic chemistry. 
A minimum of 40 percent is required for passing, and if failed, the student may repeat the 
examination in the senior year. 



Allied health majors will be required to take a departmental examination that will be adminis- 
tered at the end of the sophomore year. A minimum grade of C is required for passing. 



Career Opportunities 

Ask an old chemist what he would like most, and his answer would be, "a young chemist." This 
statement describes the atmosphere of enthusiasm about chemistry and chemical research that 
permeates the department. Indeed, chemistry at Oakwood is an exciting confrontation of the 
student with the theories and the methods of modern chemistry and biochemistry. Many of the 
graduates of this department have earned doctoral degrees in science, medicine, and dentistry from 
some of the most prestigious universities in this country and in Europe. Others have achieved 
successful careers in the laboratories of government and industry as chemists, biochemists, and 
engineers. Oakwood has been listed as one of the 23 historically Black colleges that are most 
productive of Black scientific talent. 

Currently, the demand for allied health professionals greatly exceeds the supply of available 
personnel. As a result, salaries are highly competitive and the graduate usually has a variety of 
employment options available. 



Bachelor of Science in Biochemistry 

This program is designed to meet the needs of those students who are primarily interested in 
preparing for careers in such areas as biochemistry, pharmacology, neurochemistry, medicine, 
dentistry, or pharmacy. 

l\/lajor Requirements: 

CH 141-142 General Chemistry 8 hours 

CH 211 Analytical Chemistry 3 hours 

CH 31 1-312 Organic Chemistry and Laboratory 8 hours 

CH 341 Physical Chemistry and Laboratory 4 hours 

CH 401-402 Biochemistry and Laboratory 8 hours 

CH 410 Applied Chemistry 3 hours 

Bl 131-132 General Biology 8 hours 

Bl 321 Genetics 3 hours 

Bl 460 Cell and Molecular Biology 4 hours 

Bl 481 Mammalian Anatomy I 4 hours 

CH 41 1 Instrumental Methods and Laboratory 3 hours 

MA 171-172 Calculus (MA121-122 may be required first) 8 hours 

PH 103-104 General Physics 8 hours 

Total 72 hours 

Minor is not required 



Bachelor of Science in Chemistry 

This program is designed to meet the needs of those chemistry majors who are primarily 
interested in a professional career in chemistry or graduate studies. This program prepares the 
student either for work In the chemical industry or for advanced studies in graduate school. 
Admission to this curriculum requires approval of the department and a minimum GPA of 3.25 In 
chemistry and mathematics courses. 

Major Requirements: 

CH 141-142 General Chemistry 8 hours 

CH 21 1 Analytical Chemistry 3 hours 

CH 31 1-31 2 Organic Chemistry and Laboratory 8 hours 

CH 341-342 Physical Chemistry and Laboratory 8 hours 

CH 410 Applied Chemistry 3 hours 

CH 411 Instrumental Methods 3 hours 

CH Electives 6 hours 

MA 171-172-271 Calculus (MA 121-122 may be required first) 12 hours 

MA 308 Linear Algebra 3 hours 

MA 311 Differential Equations 3 hours 

PH 103-104 General Physics 8 hours 

Total 65 hours 



Bachelor of Science in Chemistry Education 

This program qualifies a person to teach secondary school chemistry. After graduation, 
students may apply forthe Alabama Class B Certificate: Chemistry, grades 7-1 2; and the SDA Basic 
Teaching Certificate: Chemistry, grades 7-12. Chemistry Education majors must work as lab 
assistants and tutors in the department. 

Refer to the Department of Education section In this bulletin for the program outline. Program 
advisor: K. LalHIng. 



Bachelor of Science in Cytotechnology 



Major Requirements: 



CH 141-142 General Chemistry 8 hours 

Bl 131-132 General Biology 8 hours 

MA 121 Precalculus 3 hours 

AH 250 Medical Terminology 2 hours 

AH 100 Intro, to Allied Health Careers 1 hour 

CH 31 1-31 2 Organic Chemistry 8 hours 

AH 103 Introduction to Public Health 2 hours 

Bl 111-112 Anatomy and Physiology 6 hours 

Bl 221 Microbiology 4 hours 

Bl 331 Histology 3 hours 



Bl 460 Cellular and Molecular Biology 3 hours 

PY 307 Statistical Methods 3 hours 

SO 211 Cultural Anthropology 3 hours 

Total 54 hours 

GPA Requirement: Overall 2.5 required for graduation. 

Year Four: Professional component at the University of Alabama in Birmingham. 

General Education Requirement Variation: Omit the two-hour religion elective and the physics 

requirement. 

This is a cooperative program in which the student spends three years at Oakwood College 
and four quarters at an approved institution to complete the clinical requirements. The current 
affiliate agreement exists with the University of Alabama in Birmingham. 

Allied Health Program 

The Department of Chemistry houses the Allied Health Program. The following courses of pre- 
professional study are available within this program: medical technology, pre-occupational therapy, 
pre-physical therapy, pre-physician's assistant, and pre-speech pathology; as well as advising in 
such areas as pre-dental, pre-medicine, pre-medical records, pre-pharmacy, pre-respiratory 
therapy, and pre-X-ray technology. Students must ensure that they will meetthe minimum entrance 
requirements of their prospective professional schools. 

GPA Requirement: Overall 2.5 is required for all allied health majors for graduation. 



Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology 

This is a cooperative degree program in which the student spends approximately three years 
at Howard University, Meharry/Tennessee State University, and the University of Alabama in 
Birmingham. 

Major Requirements: 

AH 100 Introduction to Allied Health Careers 1 hour 

AH 250 Medical Terminology 2 hours 

CH 141-142 General Chemistry 8 hours 

CH 211 Analytical Chemistry 3 hours 

CH 31 1-31 2 Organic Chemistry and Laboratory 8 hours 

CH 401 Biochemistry 4 hours 

Bl 131-132 General Biology 8 hours 

Bl 221 Microbiology 4 hours 

Bl 422 General Physiology 3 hours 

Bl 455 Immunology 3 hours 

MA 121-122 Precalculus 6 hours 

PH 103-104 General Physics 8 hours 

PY 307 Statistical Methods 3 hours 

Total 61 hours 

General Education Requirement Variation: 

Omit the two-hour religion elective. 



Associate of Science in Pre-Occupational Therapy 

IVIajor Requirements: 

AH 100 Introduction to Allied Health Careers 1 hour 

AH 200 Practicum in Occupational Therapy 1 hour 

AH 250 Medical Terminology 2 hours 

AR 101 Basic Design or 261 Sculpture 3 hours 

Bl 111-112 Anatonny and Physiology 6 hours 

CH 101-102 Introduction to Chemistry 8 hours 

MA 121 Precalculus 3 hours 

PY 101 Principles of Psychology 3 hours 

PY 221 Personal and Soc. Adjust, or PY 321 Abnormal Behav 3 hours 

PY 307 Statistical Methods 3 hours 

PY 325 Developmental Psychology 3 hours 

SO 101 Principles of Sociology 3 hours 

Total 39 hours 

Associate of Science in Pre-Physical Therapy 

IVIajor Requirements: 

AH 100 Introduction to Allied Health Careers 1 hour 

AH 210 Practicum in Physical Therapy 1 hour 

AH 250 Medical Terminology 2 hours 

Bl 111-112 Anatomy and Physiology 6 hours 

CH 141-142 General Chemistry 8 hours 

MA 121 Precalculus 3 hours 

PH 103-104 General Physics 8 hours 

PY 101 Principles of Psychology 3 hours 

PY 307 Statistical Methods 3 hours 

SO 101 Principles of Sociology 3 hours 

Total , 38 hours 



Associate of Science in Allied Health Pre-Physician Assistant 

Major Requirements 

CH 141-142 General Chemistry 8 hours 

MA 121 Precalculus 3 hours 

Bl 111-112 Anatomy and Physiology 6 hours 

AH 250 Medical Terminology 2 hours 

AH 100 Introduction to Allied Health Careers 1 hour 

AH 103 Introduction to Public Health 2 hours 

CH 311 Organic Chemistry 4 hours 

PY 307 Statistical Methods 3 hours 

Bl 131 General Biology 4 hours 

SO 101 Sociology 3 hours 

Total 36 hours 



Associate of Science In Allied Health Pre-Speech Pathology 

Major Requirements: 

CH 141 General Chemistry 4 hours 

MA 121 Precalculus 3 hours 

AH 250 Medical Terminology 2 hours 

AH 100 Introduction to Allied Health Careers 1 hour 

AH 103 Introduction to Public Health 2 hours 

PH 103 General Physics 4 hours 

PY 307 Statistical Methods 3 hours 

Bl 111-112 Anatomy and Physiology 6 hours 

CO 320 Voice and Diction 3 hours 

PS 355 Human Growth and Development 3 hours 

SO 101 Sociology 6 hours 

PE 205 First Aid and CPR 1 hour 

Total 38 hours 

Minor in Chemistry 

CH 141-142 General Chemistry 8 hours 

CH 211 Analytical Chemistry 3 hours 

CH 31 1-312 Organic Chemistry and Lab 8 hours 

Total 19 hours 



Description of Courses 

Allied Health 

AH 100 Introduction to Allied Health Careers 1 hour 

Seminar course that introduces the scope of allied health careers. Students would be exposed 
to these professions by the instructor, during field trips, and by local practicing professionals. 

AH 103 Introduction to Public Health 2 hours 

This course is designed to enable students to develop an understanding and appreciation for 
factors affecting health status and the personal and professional means by which they might 
contribute to community health. All lectures examine applications to minority health concerns, 
health objectives for the year 2000, and career opportunities with public health. 

AH 200 Practicum in Occupational Therapy 1- 2 hours 

Provides students with the opportunity to put necessary volunteer/observation hours in at a 
facility that provides occupational therapy services. The number of credit hours awarded will 
be according to the number of hours spent at the participating facility (as provided by the 
supervising therapist) and a written report submitted by the student. One credit hour awarded 
for 40 total hours spent. Two credit hours awarded for 80 total hours spent. 



AH 21 Practicum In Physical Therapy 1 - 2 hours 

Description is the same as AH 200 except that the observation/volunteer time is in the field of 
physical therapy. 



AH 230 Introduction to Dentistry 2 hours 

This course is designed to give the student an understanding of dentistry and dental hygiene 
as professions and to develop sonne basic and clinical skills. The course will give the students 
basic knowledge in dental anatomy, morphology, and dentistry as a career. Laboratory 
experience will include visits to local dentists' offices and the School of Dentistry at Meharry 
Medical College or UAB. Prerequisites: Bl 131 and CH 141. 

AH 250 IVIedical Terminology 2 hours 

The study of origins and usage of hundreds of the medical terms that must be mastered by 
students in all health professions. The course covers and explains important prefixes, suffixes, 
and word roots. Each system of the human body and its relevant medical terms will be 
discussed. Sample case studies and hospital reports will be examined to refine the usage of 
these medical terms. 

Chemistry 

CH 100 Chemistry in Society 3 hours 

A nonmathematical study of chemical principles. Discusses the role of chemistry in society, 
how molecules are built, react, and affect our lives.Topics covered will include current prob- 
lems such as acid rain, global warming, and ozone depletion. 

CH 101 Introduction to Inorganic Chemistry and Lab 3 hours 

A survey of the fundamental principles of inorganic chemistry. Three hours of lecture and 
two hours of laboratory each week. Does not apply to a major or minor in chemistry. 

CH 102 Introduction to Organic and Biochemistry and Lab 3 hours 

A survey of fundamental principles of organic and biochemistry. Three hours of lecture and 
two hours of laboratory each week. Does not apply to a major or minor in chemistry. 

CH 105 Pregeneral Chemistry 3 hours 

A survey of chemical calculations that are basic to an understanding of general chemistry. 
Required of students who are not prepared to enter general chemistry. 

CH 1 41 -1 42 General Chemistry and Lab 4-4 hours 

A survey of the fundamental laws and theories of chemistry, with special emphasis on the 
working of problems and the relationship between atomic structure and the chemistry of the 
elements. Three hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory each week. 

CH 211 Analytical Chemistry and Lab 3 hours 

The fundamental pnnciples of quantitative analysis using gravimetric, volumetric, and spec- 
trophotometric measurements. Prerequisite: CH 142 

CH 31 1 -31 2 Organic Chemistry (W) 3-3 hours 

A survey of organic chemistry, which includes a general treatment of the mechanisms of 
organic reactions, resonance theory, the molecular orbital theory, the physiochemical basis of 
synthetic reactions, and an introduction to spectroscopy. Prerequisite: CH 142. 



CH 311L-312L Laboratory for Organic Chemistry 

31 2L emphasizes qualitative organic analysis. 



1-1 hour 



CH 331 Nutritional Biochemistry 3 hours 

A study of metabolism, macronutrition, vitamins, trace elements, food additives, and process- 
ing. Does not apply to a major in biochemistry. Prerequisite: CH 312. Offered when required. 

CH 341-342 Physical Chemistry 3-3 hours 

A study of the fundamentals of chemical thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, and quantum 
mechanics. Prerequisites: CH 142, PH 104, and MA 172 or equivalent. 



CH 341L-342L Laboratory for Physical Chemistry 



1-1 hour 



CH 401-402 Biochemistry (W) 3-3 hours 

The chemistry of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, nucleic acids, intermediary metabolism. 
Biochemistry is the study of the biology and chemistry of the human body. It is the chemistry 
of life. It explains, for example, why and how muscles grow during exercise and how the body 
uses carbohydrates to produce energy. Biochemistry seeks to explain the rationale and 
reasons for chemotherapy, control of blood pressure, diabetes, and cancer. Prerequisite: CH 
312. 



CH 401 L-402L Laboratory for Biochemistry 



1-1 hour 



CH 410 Applied Chemistry and Lab 3 hours 

A study of analytical instrumental techniques, with application to solving practical chemical 
problems. Prerequisite: CH312. 

CH 411 Instrumental Methods and Lab 3 hours 

Basic theory of instrument design and parameter optimization in the operation of scientific 
instrumentation, with application to thermal and electrical instrumentation methods. Prereq- 
uisite: CH312. 

CH 421 Special Topics in Chemistry (W) 3 hours 

Exact topics will be listed in the schedule. Topics may include quantum chemistry, instrumen- 
tal analysis, qualitative organic analysis, and biochemistry. Offered when required. Prereq- 
uisite: senior chemistry major. 

CH 480 Advanced Biochemistry 3 hours 

This course is designed to meet the needs of the following categories of students: those 
preparing to become biochemists, molecular biologists or molecular pharmacologists; those 
planning to take the GRE in biochemistry, cell and molecular biology; and those planning to 
enroll in medical and related professional schools. Prerequisite: CH 402. Offered when 
required or every other year. 



CH 490-491 Research and Independent Study (W) each 1-3 hours 

An original investigation in chemistry or biochemistry under the guidance of the faculty. 
Prerequisite: senior. 



Professors: 
Associate Professors: 



Department of Education 

Bliss (Chair), McDonald 
Mbyirukira, Melancon 



Majors Offered (B.S.): 

Biology Education 
Business Education 
Chemistry Education 
Elementary Education 
English Language Arts Ed. 
Family and Consumer Science Ed. 



Mathematics Education 
Music: Vocal/Choral Ed. P-1 2 
Music: Instrumental Ed. P-1 2 
Physical Education Teaching P-1 2 
Religious Education 
Social Science Education 



Purpose 

The purpose of the Department of Education is the "wholistic preparation of teachers for 
service in a global society." The programs are designed to prepare teachers for certification in 
Seventh-day Adventist church schools and in public school systems as well as for graduate study 
in education and related fields. 

Oakwood College is an institutional member of the American Association of Colleges for 
Teacher Education. The teacher education programs are approved by the Alabama State 
Department of Education, the General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists Department of 
Education, and the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). 



Elementary Education 

The elementary education curriculum prepares students for elementary school teaching, for 
graduate study, and for employment in administration, teaching, supervision, and support services. 
The curriculum qualifies students to apply for Alabama Class B Certification: grades K-6; 
certification in other states; and SDA Basic Teaching Certification: grades K-8. 



Secondary Education 

The following teaching areas are offered in secondary education: biology, business education, 
chemistry, English language arts, family and consumer science, mathematics, religion, and social 
science. Students pursuing biology, chemistry, and mathematics may choose a single teaching 
field orthe option of two teaching fields (see education advisor). Religious education students must 
choose a second teaching field in order to be eligible for state certification (see education advisor). 

These programs allow students, upon graduation, to apply for the Alabama Class B Certifica- 
tion: grades 6-12 (except religion), and the SDA Basic Teaching Certification: grades 7-12. 



P-1 2 Programs 

The following teaching areas are offered in early childhood through the secondary teaching level: 
music education instrumental (P-1 2), music education vocal-choral (P-1 2), and physical education 
(P-12). 



These curricula allow students, upon graduation, to apply for Alabama Class B Certification: 
P-12; and SDA Basic Teaching Certification: K-12. 

The North American Division of Education and the Alabama State Board of Education 
periodically revise the requirements governing certification. Therefore, requirements for degrees 
leading to certification are subject to change from those published in this catalog. The student is 
required to seek advisement from the Education Department at the beginning of his/her program 
of study to ensure that both degree requirements and certification requirements are met. 

Application for Admission 

Admission to Oakwood College does not mean admission to a teacher education program. 
Criteria for admission into teacher education include the following: 



A formal written application for admission to teacher education submitted after completion 
of at least 60 semester hours, including 48 hours of general studies. 
A cumulative GPA of 2.50 for all college work used to meet the approved program. The 
overall grade point average is calculated using the following components: 

a. General studies — all work used to meet the general studies requirements in the 
approved program. 

b. Professional studies — all work used in professional studies of the approved program. 

c. Teaching field{s) — all work used in the teaching field(s) used to meet program 
requirements. 

d. Additional course work may be taken to fulfill the GPA requirement. 

e. No grade below C will be accepted in the following courses: EN 1 1 1 , 1 1 2; MA 1 00, 1 01 , 
1 08; PE 21 1 ; all religion courses; all professional education courses; and all courses in the 
teaching field. 

A passing score on the Alabama Basic Skills Test (CMEE). A fee is required. 
Satisfactory recommendations from advisor(s), an education instructor, an employment 
supervisor, and a residence hall dean. 

A satisfactory interview by members of the Teacher Education Council. 
Demonstration of emotional maturity and positive attitudes as appraised and observed 
by the teacher education faculty. 



Additional Guidelines 



Teacher education students who wish to receive credit for study at institutions outside the 
United States must obtain an evaluation of the credits from World Education Services, Inc., New 
York, or from a state, federal, or private foreign credential evaluation service recognized by the 
Teacher Certification Office of the Alabama Department of Education. 

All correspondence work in general studies or work taken off campus must have prior approval . 

Students desiring a career in secondary education must consult the secondary education 
program advisor no later than the first semester of the sophomore year in order to plan an 
appropriate course of study. 

The exact course requirements may differ from student to student depending on the precise 
time a student enrolls in teacher education. This curriculum is based on denominational, state, and 
institutional policies and is thereby subject to change. 

The Teacher Education Council reserves the right to admit persons to teacher education who, 
in the judgment of the council, are most likely to profit from the teacher education program of study 
offered at Oakwood College. 

If necessary, a student may repeat required entrance examinations in an effort to meet 
admission standards. A limited number of specified courses in education may be earned prior to 
admission to the Teacher Education Program. 



Application to internship 

In the junior year, education students must apply to the Teacher Education Council for 
admission to internship for the ensuing senior year. In addition to letters of recommendation, 
students are required to maintain a minimum GPA of 2.50. Internship is offered each semester, and 
all methods courses must be taken before internship. A student may take one three-hour course 
in conjunction with internship if it does not interfere with the internship requirement. The English 
Proficiency Examination requirement must be satisfied to be admitted to internship. 

Graduation Requirements 

It is the student's responsibility to prepare and submit to the Education Department the following 
items: application for graduation (which includes the final year schedule), transfer credit form with 
the required signatures (if applicable), four-year checksheet (completely filled in), college transcript 
(including all work completed and used), applications for SDA and Alabama State certifications 
(conviction of a felony will preclude certification by the State of Alabama), fingerprinting by a certified 
agency, information sheet for graduate registry, and confirmation of registration with the placement 
office. 

Consult your education advisor about courses in general studies that may also be counted in 
the teaching field for P-12 and secondary education programs. Detailed information on teacher 
preparation and certification is outlined in the Teacher Education Handbook. 

Exit Examination 

Each student must perform satisfactorily on a departmentally prepared exit examination with 
the following components: essay questions taken from the professional and specialty areas, 
multiple choice questions taken from the professional and specialty areas, and an exit interview. 
Please see the Teacher Education Handbook for a statement on an external examination for 
seniors. 

Graduate Deficiency 

The Education Department will provide remediation free of charge to any graduate who 
performs deficiently in his/her area of specialization within two years of the program's completion. 

Career Opportunities 

An increasingly diverse student population will demand large numbers of minority teachers, 
especially males, and particularly in the areas of mathematics and the sciences. 

l\/laster of Arts in Teaching 

The Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) is offered during the summer by Andrews University on 
the Oakwood College campus. Faculty from both institutions provide the teaching staff. The 
curhculum is jointly planned to meet the needs of Oakwood College graduates as well as other 
interested practitioners. 

The NCATE-approved degree is conferred by Andrews University and will satisfy the advanced 
study requirements for the SDA Standard and Professional Teaching Certificates. 

Students studying for the Master of Arts in Teaching degree in Elementary Education may 
receive all of their instruction on the Oakwood College campus. Secondary teachers may receive 
up to 12 hours of instruction at Oakwood and the remainder at Andrews University. Application 
procedures and policies are the same as those at the Berrien Springs campus. 



90 



Bachelors' Degree 

The following core courses are required of all education students as part of their major: 

Professional Studies Core Curriculum: 

ED 130 Orientation to Teaching 2 hours 

ED 200 Educational Psychology 3 hours 

ED 240 Principles of Teaching: P-12 3 hours 

ED 250 Philosophy of Christian Education 2 hours 

ED 254 History, Philosophy, and Foundations of Education 3 hours 

ED 275 Instructional Technology 3 hours 

ED 300 Classroom Organization and Management: P-12 3 hours 

ED 350 Introduction to Special Education 3 hours 

ED 370 Tests and Measurements 3 hours 

FS 355 Human Development 3 hours 

Total 28 hours 

General Education Requirement Variations: 

ED 275 substitutes for AS 100; MA 100 plus two other math (elementary majors only); 
HI 31 4 receives religion credit; HI 1 03-1 04, 21 1 -21 2 required; no substitute for RE 331 . 



Bachelor of Science in Biology Education 



Professional Studies: 



Professional Studies Core Curriculum 28 hours 

ED 335 Methods in Teaching Science 2 hours 

ED 340 Methods in Teaching Secondary Reading 3 hours 

ED 430 Internship 9 hours 

Total 42 hours 

Teaching Field: 

Bl 1 1 1 Human Anatomy or Bl 422 General Physiology 3 hours 

Bl 131-132 Biology 8 hours 

Bl 204 Introduction to Research 1 hour 

Bl 221 Microbiology 3 hours 

Bl 230 Plant Biology 3 hours 

Bl 316 Biological Instrumentation 2 hours 

BI321 Genetics 3 hours 

Bl 401-402 Biology Seminar 2 hours 

Bl 415 Biostatistics 3 hours 

Bl 425 General Ecology •. 3 hours 

Bl 430 Philosophy of Science 2 hours 

Bl 490 Research and Independent Study 1 hour 

MA121 or122Precalculus 3 hours 

Teaching field electives from the following: 

Bl 112, 225, 331, 380, 460 6 hours 

Total 43 hours 

Total hours required for the degree are 154. 



Bachelor of Science in Business Education 

Professional Studies: 

Professional Studies Core Curriculum 28 hours 

ED 337 Foundations in Vocational Education 2 hours 

ED 338 Business Education Techniques 2 hours 

ED 340 Methods in Teaching Secondary Reading 3 hours 

ED 430 Internship 9 hours 

Total 44 hours 



Teaching Field: 

AC 220-221 Principles of Accounting 6 hours 

AS 100 Computer Applications 3 hours 

AS 120 Keyboarding 2 hours 

AS 320 Information Resource Management 3 hours 

AS 499 Office Internship 3 hours 

BA 105 Introduction to Business 3 hours 

BA302 Business Communication 3 hours 

BA 310 Principles of Management 3 hours 

BA 375 Business Law 3 hours 

BA 383 Human Resource Management 3 hours 

CO 201 Fundamentals of Public Speaking 3 hours 

EC 282 Microeconomics or EC 283 Macroeconomics 3 hours 

IS 231 Information Systems in the Organization 3 hours 

MK 301 Principles of Marketing 3 hours 

Total 44 hours 

Total hours required for the degree are 153. 



Bachelor of Science in Chemistry Education 

Professional Studies: 

Professional Studies Core Curriculum 28 hours 

ED 335 Methods in Teaching Science 2 hours 

ED 340 Methods in Teaching Secondary Reading 3 hours 

ED 430 Internship 9 hours 

Total 42 hours 

Teaching Field: 

CH 141-142 General Chemistry 8 hours 

CH 201 Qualitative Analysis 3 hours 

CH 211 Analytical Chemistry I 3 hours 

CH 31 1-312 Organic Chemistry and Laboratory 8 hours 

CH 341-342 Physical Chemistry and Laboratory 8 hours 

CH 331 Nutritional Biochemistry 3 hours 

CH 401 Biochemistry 3 hours 

CH 410 Applied Chemistry 3 hours 



MA 121 or 122 Precalculus I or II 3 hours 

MA 172 Calculus 4 hours 

PH 102 Physical Science 3 hours 

PY 307 Statistical Methods 3 hours 

Total 52 hours 

Total hours required for the degree are 149. 



Bachelor of Science In Elementary Education 

Professional Studies: 

Professional Studies Core Curriculum 28 hours 

ED 342 Reading Diagnosis 3 hours 

ED 420 Internship 9 hours 

Total 40 hours 

Teaching Field: 

ED 31 1 Methods in Teaching Science and Health: K-8 3 hours 

ED 312 Methods in Teaching Music: K-8 3 hours 

ED 313 Methods in Teaching Lang. Arts and Children's Literature: K-8 3 hours 

ED 315 Methods in Teaching Mathematics: K-8 3 hours 

ED 316 Methods in Teaching Art: K-8 3 hours 

ED 318 Methods in Teaching Social Studies and Bible: K-8 3 hours 

ED 341 Foundations of Reading 3 hours 

PE 330 Methods in Teaching Physical Education: P-12 3 hours 

Electives in the Teaching Field 3 hours 

Total 27 hours 

General Education Requirement Variations: 

PE 330 substitutes for one hour of PE activity. 
Total hours required for the degree are 133. 



Bachelor of Science In English Language Arts Education 
Professional Studies: 



Professional Studies Core Curriculum 28 hours 

ED 332 Methods in Teaching Language Arts 2 hours 

ED 340 Methods in Teaching Secondary Reading 3 hours 

ED 430 Internship 9 hours 

Total 42 hours 

Teaching Field: 

CO 201 Fundamentals of Public Speaking 3 hours 

CO 231 Introduction to Journalism and Media 3 hours 

CO 241 Introduction to Mass Communication 3 hours 

CO 353 Fundamentals of Play Directing 3 hours 



CO 355 Creative Drama 3 hours 

EN 111-112 Freshman Composition 6 hours 

EN 201 World Literature 3 hours 

EN 21 1-21 2 Survey of English Literature 6 hours 

EN 302 Survey of American Literature II 3 hours 

EN 31 1 Theory and Practice in Literary Criticism 3 hours 

EN 320 Black Literature 3 hours 

EN 324 Contemporary American Literature 3 hours 

EN 413 Descriptive English Grammar 3 hours 

Electives from: CO 232, 242, 305, 320, 330, 331 , 333, 421 , 

EN 301, 321, 324, 341, 351, 421, 431, 451, 461 15 hours 

Total 60 hours 

Total hours required for the degree are 1 52. 

Bachelor of Science In Family and Consumer Science Education 

Professional Studies: 

Professional Studies Core Curriculum 28 hours 

ED 336 Methods in Teaching Family and Consumer Sciences 2 hours 

ED 340 Methods in Teaching Secondary Reading 3 hours 

ED 430 Internship 9 hours 

Total 42 hours 

Teaching Field: 

FS 101 Introduction to Family and Consumer Sciences 1 hour 

FS 111 Food Preparation 3 hours 

FS 131 Nutrition 3 hours 

FS 151 Fashion Sewing Selection 3 hours 

FS 152 Fashion Sewing and Textiles 3 hours 

FS 201 Art in Life 3 hours 

FS 221 Home Management 3 hours 

FS 305 Parenting 3 hours 

FS 340 Family Economics and Management 3 hours 

FS 342 Family Living 3 hours 

FS 355 Human Growth and Development 3 hours 

FS 403 Child Development Practicum 3 hours 

FS 404 Admin, and Supervision of Preschools 3 hours 

FS 41 1 Housing and Interiors 3 hours 

FS 421 Quantity Food Management 3 hours 

FS 441 Home Management Practicum 3 hours 

FS 442 Occupational Family and Consumer Sciences 3 hours 

FS 453 Senior Seminar 1 hour 

FS 490 Research and Independent Study 1 hour 

Total 51 hours 

Total hours required for the degree are 149. 



94 



t 



Bachelor of Science in l\/lathematics Education 

Professional Studies: 

Professional Studies Core Curriculum 28 hours 

ED 334 Methods in Teaching Math 2 hours 

ED 340 Methods in Teaching Secondary Reading 3 hours 

ED 430 Internship: Secondary School 9 hours 

Total 42 hours 



Teaching Field: 

MA 121, 122Precalculusl, II 6 hours 

MA 171-172-271 Calculus I, II, III 12 hours 

MA 251 Geometry 3 hours 

MA 308 Linear Algebra 3 hours 

MA 311 Differential Equations 3 hours 

MA 321 Probability and Statistics 3 hours 

MA 401 Advanced Calculus 3 hours 

MA 41 1 Introduction to Modern Algebra 3 hours 

MA 490 Research and Independent Study 3 hours 

CM 210 Computer Science I with C++ 3 hours 

Total 42 hours 

Total hours required for the degree are 140. 

Bachelor of Science in Music-Instrumental Education 

Professional Studies: 

Professional Studies Core Curriculum 28 hours 

ML) 230 Principles of Teaching Music Education 2 hours 

ML) 330 Methods of Teaching Music Mat 1 2 hours 

MU 331 Methods of Teaching Music Mat II 3 hours 

ED 340 Methods in Teaching Secondary Reading 3 hours 

ED 440 Internship P-1 2 9 hours 

Total 47 hours 

Teaching Field: 

MU 165, 166 Individual Instruction 2 hours 

MU 205 Chamber Ensemble 1 hour 

MU 207 Orchestra 1 hour 

MU211-212Theory I and Laboratory 6 hours 

MU 220 Music Repertoire 2 hours 

MU 231 Survey of Woodwind Instruments 1 hour 

MU 232 Survey of Strings Instruments 1 hour 

MU 265, 266 Individual Instruction 2 hours 

MU 31 1-312 Theory II and Laboratory 6 hours 

MU 315 Form and Analysis 3 hours 

MU 320-321 Music History 6 hours 



MLI 332 Literature of School Music 3 hours 

IVIU 333 Diction for School Music 1 hour 

MU 365, 366 Individual Instruction 2 hours 

MLI 360 Conducting 2 hours 

MU 465, 466 Individual Instruction 1 hour 

MU Elective (Secondary Instruction Voice) 2 hours 

Total 43 hours 

Total hours required for the degree are 139. 



Bachelor of Science in Music-Vocal/Choral Education 



Professional Studies: 



Professional Studies Core Curriculum 28 hours 

MU 230 Principles of Teaching Music Education 2 hours 

MU 330 Methods and Materials of Teaching I 2 hours 

MU 331 Methods of Teaching Music Mat II 3 hours 

ED 340 Methods in Teaching Secondary Reading 3 hours 

ED 440 Internship P-1 2 9 hours 

Total 47 hours 

Teaching Field: 

MU 165, 166 Individual Instruction 2 hours 

MU 21 1-21 2 Theory I and Laboratory 6 hours 

MU 220 Music Repertoire 2 hours 

MU 265, 266 Individual Instruction 2 hours 

MU 31 1-312 Theory Hand Laboratory 6 hours 

MU 315 Form and Analysis 3 hours 

MU 320-321 Music History 6 hours 

MU 332 Literature of School Music 3 hours 

MU 333 Diction for School Music 1 hour 

MU 365, 366 Individual Instruction 2 hours 

MU 360 Conducting 2 hours 

MU 465, 466 Individual Instruction 2 hours 

MU 499 Recital hour 

MU Elective (Secondary Instruction Piano) 2 hours 

MU Ensemble (MU 201, 202, 203) 2 hours 

Total 41 hours 

Total hours required for the degree are 139. 



Bachelor of Science in Health and Physical Education Teaching 

Professional Studies: 

Professional Studies Core Curriculum 28 hours 

ED 340 Methods in Teaching Secondary Reading 3 hours 

ED 440 Internship P-1 2 9 hours 

RE 330 Methods in Teaching Physical Education 3 hours 

Total 43 hours 

Teaching Field: 

RE 207 Intermediate Swimming 1 hour 

RE 211 Health Principles 2 hours 

RE 226 Team Sports 3 hours 

RE 275 or 276 Gymnastics Team 1 hour 

RE 285 Introduction to Physical Education 3 hours 

RE 301 Individual and Dual Sports 3 hours 

RE 305 Officiating Athletics Contests 2 hours 

RE 310 Athletic Injuries 2 hours 

RE 31 5 Motor Learning 2 hours 

RE 335 Physical Education Tests and Measurements 3 hours 

RE 340 Administration of Physical Education 2 hours 

RE 401 Physiology of Exercise 3 hours 

RE 410 Adapted Physical Education 2 hours 

RE 41 5 Kinesiology 3 hours 

RE Electives from: 1 01 , 1 02, 1 20, 1 22, 1 26, 1 28, 1 50, 1 55 

210, and 422 2 hours 

Bl 101 Life Science 3 hours 

Bl 111 Human Anatomy and Physiology 3 hours 

Total 40 hours 

Total hours required for the degree are 140. 



Bachelor of Science in Religious Education 

Professional Studies: 

Professional Studies Core Curriculum 28 hours 

ED 317 Methods in Teaching Bible N-12 2 hours 

ED 340 Methods in Teaching Secondary Reading 3 hours 

ED 430 Internship 9 hours 

Total 42 hours 

Teaching Field: 

RE 111 Life and Teachings of Jesus 3 hours 

RE 200 Dynamics of Christian Living 2 hours 

RE 201-202 Fundamentals of Christian Faith 6 hours 

RE 301-302 Old Testament Prophets 6 hours 

RE 311 Prophetic Interpretation: Daniel 3 hours 

RE 312 Prophetic Interpretation: Revelation 3 hours 



RE 331 Gift of Prophecy 3 hours 

RE 345 World Religions 2 hours 

RE 412 Acts and the Epistles 3 hours 

RE 441 Bible Manuscripts 2 hours 

RE Electives from 249, 450, and 451 5 hours 

Total 38 hours 

Total hours required for the degree are 133. 



Bachelor of Science in Social Science Education 

Professional Studies: 

Professional Studies Core Curriculum 28 hours 

ED 333 Methods in Teaching Social Studies 2 hours 

ED 340 Methods in Teaching Secondary Reading 3 hours 

ED 430 Internship 9 hours 

Total 42 hours 

Teaching Field: 

EC 282 Principles of Microeconomics 3 hours 

EC 283 Principles of Macroeconomics 3 hours 

GE 201 Physical Geography 3 hours 

GE 202 Cultural Geography 3 hours 

GE 302 Regional Geography 3 hours 

HI 103,104 World Civilization 6 hours 

HI 165 African American History 3 hours 

HI 21 1,212 United States History 6 hours 

HI 265 Minorities in America 3 hours 

HI 314 Denominational History 3 hours 

HI 322 Hist, of England II or HI 469 Modern Europe 3 hours 

HI 325 African Civilization or HI 364 West African Civilization 3 hours 

HI 459 Recent Amer. Hist, or HI 460 America in Indust. Age 3 hours 

HI 480 Research Seminar 3 hours 

HI 490 Independent Study 2 hours 

PS 200 Comparative Government 3 hours 

PS 211 American Government 3 hours 

PS 300 State and Local Government 3 hours 

PY 101 Principles of Psychology 3 hours 

SO 101 Principles of Sociology 3 hours 

SO 231 Social Problems 3 hours 

Total 68 hours 

Total hours required for the degree are 157. 



Description of Courses 

ED 130 Orientation to Teacliing 2 liours 

An introductory course that includes an overview of the American school system and the 
preparation and qualities essential for successful teaching in public and private schools. 
Students will engage in classroom observation and participation in public school classrooms. 

ED 200 Educational Psycliology 3 hours 

A study of the nature of teaching and learning, which addresses the fundamentals involved in 
the expected developmental progression of the learning process. The course focuses on ways 
in which psychological knowledge is applied to teaching at each domain (physical, social, 
emotional, and cognitive) as individual characteristics that influence instructional decisions. 
Additionally, it includes an investigation of theories of learning and motivation and their 
instructional applications in educational settings. Prerequisites: PY 101 or SO 101 , and ED 
130. 

ED 240 Principles of Teacliing " 3 hours 

A course designed to give the prospective teacher an understanding of the principles and 
procedures of teaching. Opportunity is provided for observing, assisting, and instructing in 
laboratory classroom activities, including required experiences in a multigrade classroom. 
■ Prerequisite: EDI 30 

! 



ED 250 Philosophy of Christian Education 2 hours 

A study of the fundamental principles, concepts, and aims of Christian education. 



ED 254 History, Philosophy, and Foundations of Education (W) 3 hours 

A study of historical, philosophical, and sociological foundations of education. Special 
emphasis will be placed on ways of addressing the challenges posed by the cultural diversity 
in American schools. Prerequisite: ED 130. 



m ED 275 instructional Technology 3 hours 

A course designed to provide the prospective teacher with a functional knowledge of the 
computer and how to infuse technology in the classroom. It also encompasses a variety of 
current technologies and media applications for specific instructional designs in curriculum 
development and classroom presentations as well as the evaluation, selection, and use of 
technological materials and equipment. Additionally, a working knowledge of programming and 
software applications, such as word processing, spreadsheets, database, and Logo, is 
included. Prerequisite: one unit of high school typing or AS 120. 

ED 300 Classroom Organization and Management 3 hours 

Analysis and implementation of effective classroom organization in self-contained, nongraded 
and multigraded settings. Strategies for effective discipline, flexible grouping patterns, and 
healthy classroom climate are investigated. Prerequisites: ED 130 and 240 and admission 
to teacher education. 

ED 311-318 Methods and Materials of Teaching: K-8 3 hours 

A series of courses in methods and materials used in teaching subject matter to elementary 
students. Emphasis is placed on technology infusion as well as planning and implementing unit 
activities in simulated and field experiences. Prerequisites: ED 200 and 240. 

ED 31 1 Methods in Teaching Science and Health: K-8 3 hours 



ED 312 Methods in Teaching Music: K-8 



3 hours 



ED 313 Methods in Teaching Language Arts 
and Children's Literature: K-8 

ED 315 Methods in Teaching Mathematics: K-8 

ED 316 Methods in Teaching Art: K-8 

ED 317 Methods in Teaching Bible: K-8 

ED 318 Methods in Teaching Social Studies: K-8 



3 hours 
3 hours 
3 hours 

2 hours 

3 hours 



ED 332-338 Methods and Materials of Teaching 

in the Secondary Schools 2 hours 

A series of courses in methods and materials used in teaching subject matter to students in the 
high school and intermediate grades. Emphasis is placed on planning and implementing 
specific learning activities in simulated and clinical settings. Prerequisite: ED 240, 300 and 
admission to teacher education. 



ED 332 Methods in Teaching Language Arts 
in the Secondary School 

ED 333 Methods in Teaching Social Studies 
in the Secondary School 

ED 334 Methods in Teaching Mathematics 
in the Secondary School 

ED 335 Methods in Teaching Science 
in the Secondary School 

ED 336 Methods in Teaching Family and Consumer Sciences 
in the Secondary School 

ED 337 Foundations in Vocational Education 

ED 338 Business Education Techniques 



3 hours 

2 hours 

2 hours 

2 hours 

2 hours 
2 hours 
2 hours 

ED 340 Methods in Teaching Secondary Reading 3 hours 

A content area reading course designed to acquaint the pre-service teacher with reading and 
study strategies needed to address content assignments with understanding. Prerequisite: 
admission to teacher education. 

ED 341 Foundations of Reading 3 hours 

A course designed to examine the current trends and strategies used in teaching reading. 
Students are required to develop teacher -made materials and participate in teaching children 
to read as part of the field practicum activities. Prerequisite: ED 240. 

ED 342 Reading Diagnosis and Remediation 3 hours 

This course investigates current practices, trends, techniques, and materials for diagnosis and 
remediation of reading difficulties. Prerequisite: ED 341 . 



I ED 350 Introduction to Special Education (W) 3 hours 

. This course acquaints prospective teachers and professional workers with the characteristics 

' and problems of exceptional children and youth, including: the mentally retarded and advanced; 

I the emotionally maladjusted; and those having visual, hearing, speech, or other physical 

handicaps. Prerequisite: ED 130 



i 



11 ED 364 Libraries and Materials 3 hours 

This course is designed to introduce the student to the use and functions of a library and its 
resources. It will survey library organization, services, processes, and materials. Fundamen- 
ll tals of classification, basic reference materials, and general print and nonprint materials will be 
studied. Prerequisite: AS 100 or ED 275. 

ED 370 Educational Tests and Measurements 3 hours 

A course designed to provide functional knowledge of the meaning, use, and operation of tests 
and measurements in education. Use of measurement procedures in collecting data and 
applying appropriate statistical procedures in interpreting the results is presented. The role of 
^ evaluation in classroom instruction, the development of standardized tests, teacher-made 
* tests, and other types of tests, as well as the grading system, are studied. Prerequisites: ED 

ill 200 and ED 240. 

ED 376 Computer Assisted Instruction 2-4 hours 

A course designed to provide functional knowledge of the meaning, use, and role of computer 
assisted instruction (CAI) in education. The student will develop CAI packages and/or modules 
for classroom use. Prerequisite: AS 100 or ED 275. 



ED 385 School Curriculum and Administration 3 hours 

A basic professional course designed to teach the essential elements in the 

organization of the curriculum and the role of management in promoting the educative process. 

Prerequisite: Admission to teacher education. 

H ED 400 Contemporary Topics in Education 3 hours 

A study of contemporary issues within the field of education. Guest lecturers, research projects, 
field experiences, and seminars comprise the format of this course. Prerequisites: junior 
M standing, admission to teacher education, and permission of the instructor. 

^ ED 420-440 Internship 9 hours 

^ This course is offered each semester in cooperation with selected area schools. The student 

teacher will be assigned to a cooperating teacher at the beginning of the semester and will be 
expected to spend a minimum of 12 weeks full-time internship in the area school. Student 

^ teachers are expected to provide their own transportation to their teaching centers and to follow 
the school calendars where they are assigned. College transportation is provided for a fee. The 
course requires weekly attendance at the student teaching seminars. Application to student 
teaching should be made during the spring semester priorto the beginning of the academic year 
in which student teaching is planned. Prerequisite: senior standing. 

ED 420 Internship in Elementary School 9 hours 

ED 430 Internship in Secondary School 9 hours 

ED 440 Internship: P-12 9 hours 



d 



^ 




ED 490-491 Research and Independent Study each 1-3 hours 

A major research project which contributes to the knowledge base of the field of education. The 
project is tailored to the student's area of professional interest. Prerequisite: admission to 
teacher education and permission of the department chair. 



Department of English and Communications 



Professors: 
Associate Professors: 
Assistant Professors: 



B. Benn, U. Benn, Gooding 

Bowe (Chair), Daly, Davis, Elliott, Harrison 

Conwell, Hinson, Hyman, Mohan, Patterson, Tucker, Whatley 



Majors Offered: 


Art(A.S.) 




Communications (B.A.) 




English (B.A.) 




English Language Arts Education (B.S.) 




English/Professional Writing (B.A.) 




French (B.A.) 




Spanish (B.A.) 


Minors Offered: 


Art 




Communications 




English 




French 




Spanish 



? 



Mission 

The Department of English and Communications provides quality Christian education for 
students from diverse educational backgrounds through its programs in English, communications, 
art, and foriegn languages. These programs, in the words of the college mission statement, "are 
unequivocally Christian in character, designed to integrate faith and learning ... .prepare individuals 
for service to God and humanity, and provide an atmosphere for appreciation for oneself and 
affirmaiton of cultural diversity." 

Purpose 

The Department of English and Communications serves a dual purpose. On the one hand, it 
functions as the college's largest service department, and on the other, it offers majors in four distinct 
programs. 

A. Service Department 

The department provides a major segment of the liberal arts curriculum through its general 
education offerings in writing, literature, speech, foreign languages, and art; and it provides 
remedial courses in reading, writing, and English as a second language. Through general education 
and remedial course offerings, the department thus serves every student. 

B. Majors 

• The English program is intended to meet the needs of students desiring a strong liberal arts 
background and/or superior writing skills for the job market, offering the traditional English major 
as well as a major in professional writing. Graduates pursue advanced studies in English and related 
fields, and English is also a major of choice for law school aspirants. 



• The communications program allows students to pursue one of five concentration tracks: 
electronic nnedia, print journalism, public relations, communication arts, or plioto journalism. Eacli 
concentration's curriculum reflects requirements specific to tlie professional job marl<et and meets 
prerequisites for graduate studies. 

• The art program is designed to prepare students to make rapid application of their skills in the 
commercial art industry. Students, however, are encouraged to complete a four year degree after 
earning the A.S. degree at Oakwood College 

• The foreign language program, in conjuction with Adventist Colleges Abroad (ACA) provides 
students with an opportunity to acquire knowledge of the geography, culture, and language of a 
particular country. The program meets prerequisites for graduate school, and bilingual students find 
unlimited opportunities for service in the corporate world. 

High Scliool Preparation 

Students wishing to major in English or communications should follow the college preparatory 
program in high school. Students should endeavor to read widely and learn to express themselves 
clearly and correctly in speech and in writing. 

Exit Examinations 

All majors in English, communications, and foreign languages are required to take an exit 
examination during their senior year with a minimum 70 percent passing grade. 

All art majors must present a portfolio to the art faculty and exhibit work in a senior art show. 

Career Opportunities 

English is an excellent degree for students desiring to enter general service areas of the 
business world where skills such as editing, grant proposal writing, and speech writing are always 
in high demand. Other opportunities include graduate school, journalism, law, library science, 
medicine, public relations, and teaching. Students in communications are prepared for professional 
careers in broadcasting, journalism, and public relations, orfor media-related positions in education 
and industry. Artists find employment in a variety of professions in thousands of organizations around 
the world. Foreign language majors with their bilingual skills find unlimited opportunities for work and 
graduate school. 



Bachelor of Arts in Communications 

This program is designed to enable students to study communications from individual, group, 
historical, societal, and cultural perspectives. 

Major Requirements: 

CO 201 Fundamentals of Public Speaking 3 hours 

CO 221 Introduction to Mass Communications 3 hours 

CO 231 Introduction to Journalism and Media Writing 3 hours 

CO 31 5 Mass Media Law 3 hours 

CO 330 Communication Theory** 3 hours 

CO 401 or 403 Practicum or Internship in Communications*** 3 hours 



104 



pi CO Concentration in Public Relations, Communication Arts 

I Electronic Media, Photojournalism or Print Journalism 18 hours 

^1 CO Electives**** 6 hours 

pl AR 204 Desktop Publishing for Graphic Design* 3 hours 

'A Total 45 hours 

w 

*Students in electronic media concentration will replace AR 204 with CO 232 Writing Non-fiction for 

Electronic Media. 

**Photo journalism major substitute CO 333 Feature Writing. 

***Photo journalism major substitute AR401 Practicum in Art/Photography orAR 403 Internship 

in Art/Photography. 

****Photojournalism majors take photojournalism electives (AR 342 Advanced Photography II, CO 

332 Writing for Public Relations, CO 345 Editing, EN 304 Advanced Composition or EN 341 Technical 

Writing) 



*Publlc Relations concentration: 

CO 311 Principles of Advertising 3 hours 

CO 331 Principles and Practices of Public Relations 3 hours 

CO 332 Writing for Public Relations 3 hours 

CO 371 Public Relations Management 3 hours 

Electives by advisement 6 hours 



*Communicatlon Arts concentration: 

CO 320 Voice and Diction 3 hours 

CO 325 Interpersonal Communication 3 hours 

CO 421 Persuasion 3 hours 

Electives by advisement 9 hours 

*Electronic Media concentration: 

CO 305 Production Management 3 hours 

CO 343 Fundamentals of Audio Production or 

CO 347 Advanced Video Production 3 hours 

CO 346 Fundamentals of Video Production 3 hours 

CO 410 Broadcast Advertising 3 hours 

Electives by advisement 6 hours 

*Photo Journalism concentration: 

AR 101 Basic Design 3 hours 

AR141 Fundamentals of Photography 3 hours 

AR 314 Advanced Publishing Layout and Design 3 hours 

AR 335 Photoshop 3 hours 

AR 341 Advanced Photography I 3 hours 

AR 371 Studio Photography 3 hours 

*Print Journalism concentration: 

CO 332 Writing for Public Relations 3 hours 

CO 333 Feature Writing 3 hours 

CO 435 Editing 3 hours 



105 



Electives by advisement 9 hours 

*Minor is required 18-21 hours 

*Minor must include at least five courses that do not overlap with courses in the student's major or 
general education requirements. 

*For a minor, communications majors may substitute a second communications concentration of 
18 hours. 



Bachelor of Arts in English 

This degree is intended to meet the needs of students desiring a strong liberal arts back- 
ground or of students planning to enter graduate or professional school. 

Major Requirements: 

EN 201 World Literature 3 hours 

EN 21 1 , 212 Survey of English Literature 6 hours 

EN 301, 302 Survey of American Literature 6 hours 

EN 304 Advanced Composition 3 hours 

EN 31 1 Literary Criticism 3 hours 

EN 320 and EN 321 African American Literature 6 hours 

EN 341 Technical Writing, EN 351 Creative Writing, or 

CO 231 Introduction to Journalism 3 hours 

EN 41 3 Descriptive English Grammar 3 hours 

EN 431 Elizabethan Literature 3 hours 

EN 470 Seminar in English 1 hour 

EN Electives 6 hours 

Total 46 hours 

*Minor is required 18-21 hours 

*Minor must include at least five courses that do not overlap with courses in the student's major or 
general education requirements. 



Bachelor of Arts in English/Professional Writing 

Technical and professional writing majors are in demand both nationally and internationally. 
Students who major in technical and professional writing work in almost every field of industry and 
public life, including high-technology industries, business, government, and research. 

Major Requirements: 

EN 201 World Literature 3 hours 

Lit. Elective (English Lit., American Lit., African American Lit., 

Lit. of African Peoples 3 hours 

EN 304 Advanced Composition 3 hours 

EN 41 3 Descriptive English Grammar 3 hours 

EN 341 Professional Writing 3 hours 

EN 470 Seminar 1 hour 

106 



CO 231 Introduction to Journalism and Media Writing 3 hours 

CO 435 Editing 3 hours 

AR 204 Desktop Publishing for Graphic Design 3 hours 

H AS 203 Software Tools for Personal Productivity 3 hours 

AS 305 Information Technology for Competitive Advantage 3 hours 

BA 302 Business Communication 3 hours 

EN 490 Professional Writing Internship (Research) 3 hours 

Select two courses from EN 351 Creative Writing, 

CO 332 Writing for Public Relations, CO 333 Feature Writing, 

CO 232 Writing Non-fiction for Electronic Media 6 hours 

Total 43 hours 



I 



'Minor is required 

Bachelor of Science in English Language Arts Education 



This program qualifies persons to teach secondary school English or language arts. After 
graduation, students may apply for Alabama Class B Certificate: English Language Arts, grades 
M 7-12; and SDA Basic Teaching Certificate: English Language Arts, grades 7-12. 
« RefertotheDepartmentof Educationsectioninthisbulletinforthe program outline. Program 

' Advisor: L. Gooding. 

a 

^ Bachelor of Arts in French 

SI students intending to use Adventist Colleges Abroad (ACA) classes to majoror minor in French 

^ must be advised by the program director before registering for classes. Program director: U.Benn 

Major Requirements: 

• FR 201 -202 Intermediate French 6 hours 

9 FR Electives (offered at ACA campuses) 27 hours 

FR 490-491 Research and upper division electives 9 hours 

Total 42 hours 

m 

2 *Minor is required 18-21 hours 

a 
a 
ja 



107 



Bachelor of Arts in Spanish 

Students intending to use ACA classes to major or minor in Spanish must be advised by the 
program director before registering for classes. Program Director: U. Benn 

IVIajor Requirements: 

SP 201 -202 Intermediate Spanish 6 hours 

SP Electives (Offered at ACA campuses) 27 hours 

SP 490-491 Research and upper division electives 9 hours 

Total 42 hours 

Minor is required 18-21 hours 

*Minor must include at least five courses that do not overlap with courses in the student's major or 
general education requirements. 



Associate of Science in Art 
Concentration: Commercial Art 

This two-year program is designed to prepare students to make rapid application of their skills 
in the commercial art world of visual communications. The students concentrate on creating posters, 
banners, murals, and other publicity-type productions. Designs and layouts for books, magazines, 
advertisements, and other printed materials are studied in a practical manner to produce camera- 
ready art for printing. 

Major Requirements: 

AR 101 -102 Basic Design 6 hours 

AR 111 Fundamentals of Drawing 3 hours 

AR 141 Fundamentals of Photography 3 hours 

AR 204 Desktop Publishing for Graphic Design 3 hours 

AR217 Art Appreciation 3 hours 

AR311 Photoshop 3 hours 

AR 314 Advanced Publishing Layout and Design 3 hours 

AR 377 Portfolio 2 hours 

AR Electives 3 hours 

Total 29 hours 



Associate of Science in Art 
Concentration: Photography 

Photography has very broad and practical uses such as photojournalism, documentation, 
illustration, and fine art. This two-year program provides training and experience with equipment 
and techniques in black-and-white and color photography. 

Major Requirements: 



AR 101-102 Basic Design 6hours 

AR 141 Fundamentals of Photography 3hours 



AR 204 Desktop Publishing for Grapliic Design 3 hours 

AR 217 Art Appreciation 3 hours 

AR311 Photoshop 3 hours 

AR 341 Advanced Photography 3 hours 

AR 374 Studio Photography 3 hours 

AR 377 Portfolio 2 hours 

Artelectives 3 hours 

Total 29 hours 



Minor in Art 

AR 101 Basic Design 3 hours 

AR 111 Fund, of Drawing or AR 121 Fund, of Painting 3 hours 

AR 141 Fundamentals of Photography 3 hours 

AR217 Art Appreciation 3 hours 

AR 31 1 Advanced Drawing, AR 321 Advanced Painting, or 

AR341 Advanced Photography 3 hours 

Artelectives (must be upper division) 6 hours 

Total 21 hours 



Minor in Communications 

CO 201 Fundamentals of Public Speaking 3 hours 

CO 231 Introduction to Journalism and Media Writing 3 hours 

CO 221 Introduction to Mass Communications 3 hours 

Electives (in one concentration; at least 9 upper division) 12 hours 

Total 21 hours 



Minor in English 

EN 201 World Literature 3 hours 

EN 21 1,21 2 Survey of English Literature 6 hours 

EN 301, 302 Survey of American Literature 6 hours 

EN 304 Advanced Composition 3 hours 

Elective 3 hours 

Total 21 hours 



Minor in English (Writing Emphasis) 

EN 201 World Literature 3 hours 

EN 304 Advanced Composition 3 hours 

EN 41 3 Descriptive English Grammar 3 hours 

EN Literature Elective 3 hours 

CO 231 Introduction to Journalism and Media Writing 3 hours 

Select two courses from: EN 341 Technical Writing, 

CO 333 Feature Writing, CO 431 Writing for Public Relations, and 

CO 435 Editing 6 hours 

Total 21 hours 



109 



Minor in French 

FR 201 -202 Intermediate French 6 hours 

FR electives (offered at ACA campus) 9 hours 

FR upper division elective 6 hours 

Total 21 hours 



IVIinor in Spanish 

SP 201 -202 Intermediate Spanish 6 hours 

SP Electives (Offered at ACA campus) 9 hours 

SP upper division elective 6 hours 

Total 21 hours 



Description of Courses 
Art 

AR 101-102 Basic Design 3-3 hours 

A study of the basic principles and elements of representational and nonrepresentational design. 
Two- and three-dimensional design is explored. Emphasizes understanding of line, color, shape, 
texture, and balance in spatial relationships. 

AR 111 Fundamentals of Drawing 3 hours 

The fundamentals of rendering based on the principles and elements of design and spatial 
organization. Natural forms will be approached to develop the powers of observation, self- 
expression, and technical skills. Various black-and-white media will be used. 

AR 121 Fundamentals of Painting 3 hours 

The fundamentals of painting in oils and/or acrylics designed to develop the proper use of 
equipment, media, and color in landscape, still-life, and figure subjects. Offered alternate years. 

AR 1 41 Fundamentals of Photography 3 hours 

The fundamentals of using the camera as an instrument of creative expression. The course is 
a hands-on experience in camera handling black-and-white negative and print developing, 
contact printing, and enlargements. Special emphasis is placed on materials, lighting, exposure, 
and photography as a means of creative aesthetic self-expression. Students must have a 35mm 
camera. Rentals are available at the College Bookstore. 

AR 204 Desktop Publishing for Graphic Design 3 hours 

The study and use of lettering, type styles, graphics, page layout design and desktop publishing. 
The course is designed to study the advancement and refinement of graphic art techniques, with 
emphasis on the proper use of mechanical tools and computer-aided (Macintosh) desktop 
publishing systems, as they relate to the commercial art industry. 

AR 21 7 Art Appreciation 3 hours 

A general survey of art from prehistory to contemporary times. By means of lectures and slide 
and video presentations, the course is designed to engender an appreciation of visual expression 
and show how the art of cultures throughout the ages has shaped modern Western culture. 
Prerequisite: EN 112. 

110 



EN 324 Twentieth Century British Literature (W) 3 hours 

An introduction to major British writers of the twentieth century, with emphasis on the impact of 
ll the politics of social change on the literature of the period. Prerequisites: EN 211 , EN 21 2, EN 

301 , or EN 302 and junior standing. 

|| EN 341 Professional Writing (W) 3 hours 

Acourse designed to meet the demands of writing in industry. Writing of reports, proposals, and 
lij memoranda, with emphasis on organization and clarity, is required. Prerequisites: EN112and 

junior standing. 

EN 351 Creative Writing 3 hours 

Designed to meet the needs of those interested in developing skills in creative writing, fiction, 
nonfiction, and poetry. Prerequisites: EN 1 1 2 and junior standing. 

Jt EN 41 1 History of the English Language (W) 3 hours 

A study of the development of the language, with emphasis on the sound system and grammar; 
i application of historical insights into problems of teaching English. Offered alternate years. 

Prerequisites: EN 21 1 and 21 2. 

• EN 41 3 Descriptive English Grammar 3 hours 

j| An intensive study of English grammar from both the traditional and the linguistic points of view. 

Prerequisite: EN 304. 

J EN 421 Milton (W) 3 hours 

A study of Paradise Lost and Paradise Regained, with some attention given to Milton's minor 

• poems. Offered alternate years. Prerequisites: EN 21 land 21 2. 

EN 431 Elizabethan Literature (W) 3 hours 

A study of major authors and works of the period. Offered alternate years. Prerequisites: EN 
211and212. 

EN 451 Romanticism (W) 3 hours 

A specialized course in the study of English poetry and prose between 1 798 and 1 832. Emphasis 
is placed on the classical background of Romanticism and the major Romantic poets. Offered 

• alternate years. Prerequisites: EN 21 land 21 2. 

EN 461 Victorianism (W) 3 hours 

W A specialized course emphasizing major English writers from 1 832-1 890. Attention is given to 

H the milieu of the period. Offered alternate years. Prerequisites: EN 21 1 and 212. 

■ EN 470 Seminar in English 1 hour 

!| A seminar and capstone course in which senior English majors make a brief, comprehensive 



SI 



review of the body of knowledge that comprises the English program at Oakwood College, and 
study current problems and developments in the broad field of English language and literature. 



^ Prerequisites: senior status and 27 upper division English hours. 

EN 490-491 Research and Independent Study each 1-3 hours 

Individual research under the guidance of an instructor. Limited to senior English majors. 
Prerequisite: prior approval of the department chair. 



117 



French 

FR 1 01 -1 02 Beginning French 3-3 hours 

Study of the fundamentals of grammar, with elementary conversation and reading of simple 
material on French culture. Accurate pronunciation is stressed. Laboratory is required. 
Students who have successfully completed two or more years of high school French within two 
years or less before resuming study of the language at Oakwood College must enroll in 
Intermediate French. 

FR 201 -202 Intermediate French 3-3 hours 

A general review and continuation of grammar and vocabulary building, with special emphasis 
on the spoken language. Selected readings on French-American life and culture. Laboratory 
is required. Prerequisite: FR 102. 

FR 490-491 Research and Independent Study 3-3 hours 

Individual research under the guidance of an instructor. Prerequisites: senior French majors 
who have completed one year on an ACA campus. 

Courses offered at Institut Adventiste du Saleve (in quarter hours) 

FR 221 Intermediate Composition 2-3 hours 

Fundamental principles of French composition and stylistics. 

FR 251 Intermediate Oral Expression 1-3 hours 

For students having a basic knowledge of French. They will learn how to function in a socially 
acceptable way in French culture by using the vocabulary, syntax, and sentence structure 
studied in FR 201 class in dialogues, role plays, and varied activities. 

FR 301 Advanced French 6 hours 

For students scoring sufficiently high on the placement test or those having completed FR 201 . 

FR 321 Advanced Composition I 2-3 hours 

Techniquesof composition, planning, and organization, narrative procedures, descriptions, and 
development of ideas. 

FR 351 Advanced Oral Expression I 1-3 hours 

Students will develop their ability to express their ideas on different topics concerning French 
culture and civilization through presentations. 

FR 421 -422-423 Advanced Composition II each 2-3 hours 

Techniques of expository writing. Study of the process of writing, analysis of the subject, 
narrative procedures, description, and development of ideas. 

FR 425-426-427 French Rhetoric each 2-5 hours 

Techniques of expository writing (as for examinations). Study of the process of writing: analysis 
of the subject; documentation and research of ideas; complete outlining; writing of drafts and 
rewriting; linking of ideas in various parts of a text. 

FR 431 -432-433 Advanced Orthography each 2-3 hours 

Intensive practical application of French orthography. 



118 



FR 441-442-443 Advanced Grammar each 2-4 hours 

Systematic review of the rules of Frencli grammar. 



FR 451 Advanced Oral Expression II 2-3 hours 

Individual exercises and group discussion on a wide variety of current topics in order to allow 
^ the student to acquire and put into practice a more varied, precise, and flexible style of spoken 

|p French. 

^ FR 461 -462 Literary Discussion 2-2 hours 

^ Systematic reading and analysis of vocabulary style ideas of specific French literary works. 

Every quarter new authors and books of different styles are studied in depth. 
w 
I FR 465-466-467 Literary Analysis each 2-3 hours 

Reading, analysis, and commentary of French literary texts. 

FR 471 -472-473 French Civilization each 2-3 hours 

A study of the main artistic trends in French history and the importance and influence of French 
culture from the Middle Ages to contemporary times. French life today: intellectual, artistic, 
political, and religious. 

FR 481 Survey of French Literature 2 hours 

[Ji A study of the history of French literature and its different styles utilizing works from the Middle 
Ages to the twentieth century. 

H FR 491 -492-493 Survey of French Literature each 2-3 hours 

A study of the history of French literature and its different styles utilizing works from the 
■ eighteenth century to the twentieth century. 



Spanish 



^ SP 101 -102 Beginning Spanish 3-3 hours 

A study of the fundamentals of grammar, with elementary conversation and reading of simple 
i material on Spanish and Hispanic-American culture. Accurate pronunciation is stressed. 

Il Laboratory is required. Students who have successfully completed two or more years of high 

school Spanish within two years or less before resuming study of the language at Oakwood 
' College must enroll in Intermediate Spanish. 

SP 201 -202 Intermediate Spanish 3-3 hours 

P A general review and continuation of grammar and vocabulary building, with special emphasis 

»l on the spoken language. Selected readings on Spanish and Hispanic American life and culture. 

Laboratory is required. Prerequisite: SP 102. 

SP 490-491 Research and Independent Study 3-3 hours 

Individual research under the guidance of an instructor. Prerequisite: senior Spanish major 
r who has completed one year on an ACA campus. 

Courses offered at Colegio Adventista de Sagunto (in quarter hours) 

AP 201 -202-203 Spanish Folklore 2-2-2 hours 

Insight on the customs, traditions, holidays, costumes, music, songs, and dances of the Spanish 
people, with an in-depth study on individual regions. 

119 



SP 251-252-253 Intermediate Spanish Grammar 4-4-4 hours 

Review of grammar combined with oral and written practice at the intermediate level. 

SP 261 -262-263 Intermediate Spanish Composition 3-3-3 hours 

Written Spanish, with special emphasis on grammar, orthography, and syntax atthe intermediate 
level. At least one composition due each week based on everyday topics. 



SP 271-272-273 Intermediate Spanish Conversation 

Oral practice in class, with emphasis on grammar, phonetics, and syntax at 
the intermediate level. Laboratory required. 



2-2-2 hours 



SP 31 2-31 3 Spain and its Culture 2-2 hours 

Lectures and readings on Spanish culture-its history, politics, arts, and literature-with special 
emphasis on the Spanish way of thinking. 

SP 331 -332-333 History of Spanish Literature 3-3-3 hours 

A general study of Spanish literature from the Middle Ages to contemporary times. Recom- 
mended for students with advanced Spanish language skills. 

SP 351 -352-353 Advanced Spanish Grammar 4-4-4 hours 

An in-depth study of Spanish grammar and syntax combined with both oral and written practice. 

SP 361 -362-363 Advanced Spanish Composition I 3-3-3 hours 

Written Spanish, with special emphasis on reading comprehension and compositions which 
incorporate the usage and understanding of studied grammatical structures. Compositions will 
be related to themes studied in class. 



SP 371 -372-373 Advanced Spanish Conversation I 2-2-2 hours 

Attainment of a strong basic Spanish vocabulary, with special emphasis on grammatical 
structures and idioms, and an understanding of the different speaking levels that exist within the 
language. Emphasis will also be placed on being able to understand and participate fluently and 
with self-confidence in a colloquial Spanish conversation. Laboratory is required. 



SP 399 Readings in Spanish Literature 



1-3 hours 



SP 422-423 Translation and Interpretation 2-2 hours 

Translation methodology and its application to translations of Spanish texts into English and vice 
versa. Attention is given to the idiomatic expressions in both languages. 

SP 451 -452-453 Advanced Spanish Grammar II 4-4-4 hours 

Review of grammar, with emphasis on difficult points of grammar, orthography, syntax, and style, 
combined with the study of expressions, idioms, and an increase in vocabulary. 

SP 461 -462-463 Advanced Spanish Composition II 3-3-3 hours 

Written Spanish, with special emphasis on difficult points of grammar, orthography, syntax, and 
style, combined with the study of expressions, idioms, and an expanded vocabulary. 

SP 471 -472-473 Advanced Spanish Conversation II 2-2-2 hours 

Discussion at all levels of the language: colloquial, technical, and philosophical. Some of the 
discussions will be taken from newspapers and/or magazines. Special emphasis on syntax, 
style, phonetic accuracy, and vocabularly. Two hours of laboratory required each week. 



120 



Department of Family and Consumer Sciences 



Professor: Davis (Chair) 

Associate Professor: Warren 

Assistant Professors: Mohan, Snnlth 

l\/lajors: Dietetics (B.S.) 

Family and Consunner Sciences (B.S.) 

Family and Consumer Sciences Education (B.S.) 

Human Development and Family Studies (B.S.) 

IVIinors: Apparel and Design 

Child Development 
Food and Nutrition 
Family and Consumer Sciences 



Purpose 

It is the purpose of the Department of Family and Consumer Sciences to provide professional 
programs in nutrition, human development and family studies, family and consumer sciences 
education, and general family and consumer sciences. The faculty requires that every student 
enrolled in each professional program acquire an understanding of the body of knowledge specified 
for that program. The department will provide a Christian perspective to all aspects of family and 
consumer sciences and utilize knowledge and skills to strengthen family life in the home and 
society. 

The Department of Family and Consumer Sciences has been approved for the Didactic 
Program in Dietetics by the American Dietetics Association. Students planning to qualify for the 
Didactic Program in Dietetics must see the program director for a list of current classes required 
by the American Dietetic Association. The Teacher Education Program in Family and Consumer 
Sciences is approved by the Alabama State Department of Education and the National Council for 
Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). 

All majors are required to become members of the student section of the American Association 
of Family and Consumer Sciences or the American Dietetic Association. 



Application for Admission 

To be admitted as a major in the Department of Family and Consumer Sciences, students must 
have completed at least 32 semester hours, including EN 1 1 2 Freshman Composition, and have 
an overall minimum GPA of 2.00. 



Exit Examination 

All students are required to take an exit examination the first semester of their senior year. 
Evaluation of conceptual skills, techniques of projects, and laboratory performances will be 
included in the examination. All students must pass the examination with 70 percent proficiency 
before graduation. 



121 



Career Opportunities 

Career choices for graduates from this department include: dietitians, fashion coordinators, 
fashion designers, family life specialists, hospital administrators, interior decorators, nutritionists, 
preschool directors, and teachers. 



Bachelor of Science in Dietetics 

This program is designed for students who possess a strong interest in the sociological, 
psychological, physiological, and economical aspects of food and nutrition, with emphasis on health 
promotion/disease prevention. It is required that students have a GPA of at least a 2.5 or better in 
order to apply to the Didactic Program in Dietetics. 

Admission Requirements for the Didactic Program in Dietetics: 

1 . GPA 2.5 or above on 4.0 scale. 

2. Students whose native language is not English must achieve a satisfactory score on the 
TOEFL examination. 

3. Have a grade of C or better in EN 111-112 Freshman Composition. 

4. Students who have less than 2.5 can be admitted on a provisional basis only by meeting the 
following criteria: 

* Successful score on Watson Glaser Test 

* Must score a competent level (1 2th grade) on the reading test 

IVIajor Requirements: 

FS 101 Introduction to Family and Consumer Sciences 1 hour 

FS 111 Food Preparation 3 hours 

FS 131 Nutrition 3 hours 

FS 322 Community Nutrition I 3 hours 

FS 323 Community Nutrition II 3 hours 

FS 360 Vegetarian Cuisine 3 hours 

FS 421 Quantity Food Management 3 hours 

FS 431 Food Systems Management 3 hours 

FS 438 Clinical Nutrition I 3 hours 

FS 439 Clinical Nutrition II 3 hours 

FS 453 Senior Seminar 1 hours 

FS 490 Research and Independent Study 3 hours 

BA 310 Principles of Management 3 hours 

Bl 111-112 Human Anatomy and Physiology 6 hours 

Bl 221 Microbiology 4 hours 

CH 141-142 General Chemistry 8 hours 

CH 31 1-312 Organic Chemistry 8 hours 

CH 331 Nutritional Biochemistry 3 hours 

EN 341 Technical Writing 3 hours 

PY 101 Principles of Psychology 3 hours 

SO 101 Principles of Sociology 3 hours 

Total 71 hours 



122 



AR 261 Sculpture 3 hours 

The basics of three-dimensional designs in wood, stone, clay, plaster, and other nnaterials, 
putting into practice the fundamentals of modeling, can/ing, casting, and construction. Emphasis 
is placed on design, tools, and techniques leading to the control and understanding of materials 
and their relationship to sculpture. No previous experience needed. 

AR 31 1 -31 2 Advanced Drawing 3-3 hours 

Advanced development of competent graphic expression by drawing from the model, with 
emphasis on line, mass, gesture, and structure. Students manipulate various media and 
materials, developing an individual method and style. Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: AR 
111. 

AR 31 4 Advanced Publishing Layout and Design 3 hours 

Advanced study of computer-generated graphic and electronic page layout and design. Layouts 
are produced on page layout software and carried to a camera-ready stage for production. 
Emphasis is placed on fine tuning design and layout skills as well as mastery of software for 
speedy productions. Prerequisite: AR 204. 

AR 335 Photoshop 3 hours 

The study and mastery of Photoshop imaging software. Student explores the flexibility of image 
manipulation and creative use of built-in filters and plug-ins. Student learns to digitize and color 
correct images for the purpose of imaging print making, graphic layout, and electronic media. 
Emphasis is placed on use of software, scanning techniques, equipment usage, material, 
creation, and manipulation of images electronically. Prerequisite: AR 204. 

AR 321 -322 Advanced Painting 3-3 hours 

A continued study in the advancement of personal style and skill through the study of form and 
color in portrait and figure painting using oils and acrylics. Prerequisite: AR 121. 



AR 341 -342 Advanced Photography 3-3 hours 

Advanced applications in black-and-white and color photography, producing prints, enlarge- 
ments, and transparencies, with emphasis on personal expressions and creative use of 
^ photography for illustration and fine art. Individual experimentation is highly recommended. 
Prerequisite: AR 141. 

j^ AR 374 Studio Photography 3 hours 



» 



A survey of lighting techniques used in the studio, ranging from portraiture to still life. To be able 
to understand the reasons for using various types of lighting equipment and some of the 
Al techniques employed in using them, the class hours will be devoted to lighting demonstrations 
in the studio, lectures, and critiquing of assignments. Laboratory will consist of planning out 
assignments, gathering props, shooting assignments, printing, and mounting forclass critiques. 
Prerequisite: AR 141 or permission of instructor. 



AR 377 Portfolio 1-3 hours 

The development of a professional portfolio of work done as a sample for prospective employers. 
Preparation for job interviews will be emphasized, and a well-written resume will be produced, 
ready for stepping into the job market. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 



111 



AR 401 -402 Practicum in Art/Photography 3 hours 

Student gains practical experience in commercial art, photography or photo journalism. The 
student will work under the cooperative direction of professionals and the art faculty. Student 
becomes familiar with ongoing tasks and techniques in commercial art, photography, or photo 
journalism concentration. Practicum of six hours each week is required. Prerequisites: adequate 
background and consent of the instructor. 

AR 403 Internship in Art/Photography 3 hours 

The student must work full-time in the commercial Aat, photography or photojournalism industry 
and perform ongoing tasks and practices of professionals in the student's area of concentration. 
Student must apply to the employing organization and be accepted to work four to eight weeks 
underthe direction of a professional. Prerequisites: adequate background, juniorstanding, and 
consent of the instructor. 

Communications 

CO 201 Fundamentals of Public Speaking 3 hours 

A study of the fundamental principles of oral communication and their effective application 
through classroom speeches and constructive criticism. Prerequisite: EN 11 1 . 

CO 221 Introduction to Mass Communications 3 hours 

Explores the history, structures, functions, responsibilities, and impact of mass media in society. 
Includes an overview of the print and electronic industries and how they relate to each other, 
their roles in technological advances, and how they influence society's formation of knowledge, 
attitudes, and behavior. Prerequisite: EN 11 1 . 

CO 231 Introduction to Journalism and Media Writing (W) 3 hours 

The principles of news gathering, interpreting, and reporting are studied. Experience is gained 
in writing newspaper articles. Prerequisites: CO 221, EN 112, and AS 120ortype45 wpm. 

CO 232 Writing Non-fiction for Electronic Media (W) 3 hours 

Principles and techniques for script writing for non-fiction radio and TV productions are explored. 
Besides simulated exercises, students will also write afinal documentary script targeted for use 
by students enrolled in CO 347 as part of their productions. Prerequisites: 231 ; concurrent 
enrollment is acceptable. 

CO 242 Mass Communication and Society 3 hours 

An analysis of the relationships between mass communication and society, including institutional 
functions and socioeconomic, structural-cultural, and other factors affecting mass communi- 
cations processes. Prerequisite: CO 221 . 

CO 311 Principles of Advertising 3 hours 

An institutional and functional study of persuasion, consumer motivation and behavior, and 
application of the principles of advertising to electronic media. Students will prepare a media 
campaign for a product or service in a simulated market environment. Prerequisite: CO 221 . 

CO 31 5 Mass Media Law 3 hours 

An overview of legal aspects of the media and First Amendment issues, with emphasis on libel, 
privacy and intrusion, copyright, FCC laws, advertising, and marketing. Prerequisite: CO 221 . 



> 



CO 320 Voice and Diction 3 hours 

Trains for improvement in tlie use of the speaking voice. Attention is focused on range, flexibility, 
clarity of articulation, and standards of pronunciation, with individual help in the correction of 
faulty speech habits. Prerequisite: CO 201 . 

CO 325 Interpersonal Communications 3 hours 

A study of interpersonal communication skills such as listening, conflict management, and 
nonverbal communication. Practical applications of skills are emphasized. Prerequisite: CO 
201. 

CO 330 Communication Theory 3 hours 

The scope and purpose of communication, the factors involved in the process, and the role of 
language in human behavior. Prerequisite: CO 201. 

CO 331 Principles and Practices of Public Relations 3 hours 

An in-depth analysis of the practice of public relations. Students will study the field's history and 
current techniques used by practitioners to build two-way relationships with their publics and 
influence public opinion. Prerequisite: CO 221 . 

CO 332 Writing for Public Relations (W) 3 hours 

Examines the various styles and formats used in public relations writing and how they impact 
target audiences, message strategies, and channel selection. Prerequisite: CO 221 and AR 204. 

CO 333 Feature Writing (W) 3 hours 

Theory and practice of writing feature stories for newspaper and magazine use, supplemented 
by practical assignments in interviewing, writing, revision, and marketing of articles. Prerequi- 
site: CO 231. 

CO 342 Radio and TV Announcing 3 hours 

A course designed to help the student acquire the skills that willlead to competent performance 
as a media announcer. Study is given to the speech techniques that are required in preparation, 
announcing, and narration of various types of material. Prerequisites: CO 201 and CO 232. 

CO 343 Fundamentals of Audio Production 3 hours 

Practical aspects of radio production techniques are studied, with emphasis on the basic 
operation of radio and audio equipment. Group and individual activities. Laboratory is involved. 
Prerequisite: CO 221. 

CO 346 Fundamentals of Video Production 3 hours 

The student is expected to become conversant with the basic operation of audio and video 
equipment. Keyboard skills and a laboratory are involved. Students are required to participate 
in routine lab exercises for a minimum of six hours each week. Each student will also be required 
to demonstrate ability to translate stories and ideas into moving images by producing a portfolio 
videoof approximately three to five minutes in length. Prerequisite: CO 221,00232; concurrent 
enrollment permissible. 

CO 347 Advanced Video Production 3 hours 

Students will have the option of selecting one or more of the four following areas of interest: audio, 
editing, photography, or producing/directing. A laboratory is involved. They will be required to 
produce an individual video based on a script written or acquired from students in CO 232 and 
planned in CO 350. Prerequisites: CO 232, CO 346 and concurrent enrollment in CO 350. 

113 



CO 350 Production Management 3 hours 

The course will teach the methodology of planning and management during preproduction, 
production, and postproduction of nondramatic films and videos. Students will write a proposal, 
take a script, and break it down for production outline, scheduling, budgeting, and producing. 
Prerequisites: CO 221, CO 346 and concurrent enrollment in CO 347 Advanced Video 
Production. 

CO 353 Fundamentals of Play Directing 3 hours 

Theories of direction and production. Producing and directing a one-act play or one act from 
a longer play for public performance. Prerequisite: CO 201. 

CO 355 Creative Drama 3 hours 

Philosophy and techniques involved in improvised drama, including drama for children. 
Prerequisite: CO 201. 

CO 360 Fiction and Dramatic Screen Writing (W) 3 hours 

Students will learn how to develop stories and characters, the formats for various genres, and 
the art of writing and marketing a script. Students will be required to write a screenplay from a 
minimum of 25 min. length to a full-length script. Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: CO 347. 

CO 365 Fiction/Dramatic Film and TV Production 3 hours 

Students will go through the entire process of producing a dramatic video or film using an 
electronic camera (or they may upgrade to a 1 6mm camera at their own expense) based on a 
script written or acquired from CO 360. Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: CO 347; 
recommended: CO 353. 

CO 371 Public Relations Management 3 hours 

Students will be exposed to all elements involved in managing a public relations office. Specific 
focus will be given to strategic planning, time management, creating budgets, staffing, working 
with clients and service providers, and personnel training. Prerequisites: CO 330 and CO 331 . 

CO 373 Working With the Media in Public Relations 3 hours 

Studies will focus on how to build media relationships that promote credibility and news coverage, 
techniques that generate positive publicity, crisis management, and integrating new media 
technologies into public relations practice. Prerequisites: CO 331 and CO 332. 

CO 401 -402 Practicum in Communications 3-3 hours 

Students will gain practical experience in journalism, communication arts, public relations, or 
audio/video production. Students will work under the cooperative direction of professionals and 
the communications faculty. Students will become familiar with the ongoing tasks and routines 
required in their areas of concentration. Practicum of six hours each week is required. 
Prerequisites: adequate background and consent of the instructors. 

CO 403 Internship in Communications 2- 3 hours 

Student must work full-time at a journalistic, public relations, or broadcast facility and perform 
ongoing tasks and practices of professionals in the student's area of concentration. Student 
must apply to the employing organization and be accepted to work four to eight weeks under 
the direction of a professional. Prerequisites: adequate background, junior standing, and 
consent of the instructor. 



114 



CO 41 Broadcast Advertising 3 hours 

Besides acquiring an overview of how tine advertising, broadcasting and media-buying industries 
worl< in a synergic environment, students will learn to write and produce effective commercials 
for radio, TV, and the Internet, and understand the sales and marketing aspects of the broadcast 
advertising industry. Each student will simulate an advertising campaign which will include at 
least three commercials/PSAs. A lab is involved. Prerequisite: CO 343 or CO 347. 

CO 41 1 Broadcast IVIanagement 3 hours 

A study of the various aspects involved in managing a media facility as a medium for both profit 
and social change. Offered alternate years. Prerequisites: CO 201 and CO 221. 



1^ CO 421 Persuasion 3 hours 

An advanced speech course in which the student will study theories and models of persuasive 
speaking and practice the delivery of persuasive speeches. Offered alternate years. 
Prerequisite: CO 201. 



CO 435 Editing (W) ' 3 hours 

Theory and practice of newspaper copy editing and headline writing. Emphasis is placed on 
the need to develop a broad grasp of contemporary social, political, and religious issues with 
discretion and finesse. Laboratory experience required. Prerequisites: CO 231 and CO 333. 



English 

EN 090-091 English as a Second Language 3-3 hours 

A course designed for students whose native language is not English. Study and practice of 
English in its written form. Laboratory is required. 

EN 095 Composition Skills Review 3 hours 

This course is required of all beginning freshmen during theirfirst semester if the ACT enhanced 
English score is below 1 6 or the SAT English score is below 41 0. Laboratory is required. An 
exit examination is given before the completion of EN 095. 



EN 099 Developmental Reading 2 hours 

Thiscourse is required of all beginning freshmen during theirfirst semester if the ACTenhanced 
I English score is below 1 6 or the SAT English score is below 41 0. Laboratory is required. 

^ EN 11 1-1 12 Freshman Composition 3-3 hours 

^ A study of rhetoric designed to teach students effective writing, reading, speaking, and listening. 

In EN 1 1 1 , emphasis is placed on the short theme, and close study is given to expository and 

argumentative writing. In EN 1 1 2, students are introduced to literature, to methods of research 
^ using the library, the Internet, and CD-ROM, and to writing a research paper. An exit examination 

is given before the completion of EN 1 1 1 , and the requirements for EN 1 1 2 may not be met by 

CLEP. 



I 



P 



> 



EN 201 World Literature (W) 3 hours 

A survey of selected world masterpieces of literature-some in translation. Emphasis is placed 
^ on the ancient, medieval, and Renaissance periods, and on major African-American authors. 

^ Prerequisite: EN 112. 

115 



EN 204 Effective Reading Strategies for College Students 2 hours 

A course designed for college students to increase their rate of comprehension. Speed drill, 
vocabulary, and comprehension exercises are covered. 

EN 211 , 21 2 Survey of English Literature I, II (W) 3,3 hours 

A study of English literature from Anglo-Saxon to modern times. Historical and biographical 
backgrounds are important, but major emphasis is placed on a critical and evaluative analysis 
of the literature. Prerequisite: EN 112. 

EN 221 Literature of African Peoples 3 hours 

This course introduces students to the literature of sub-Saharan African Americans and West 
Indians. 

EN 250 English Fundamentals 2 hours 

A course designed for students who did not pass the English Proficiency Examination required 
in their junior year. In it, the basic mechanics of sentence and paragraph structure will be 
reviewed until the student can demonstrate the ability to write acceptable standard English. Only 
students who have taken the English Proficiency Examination may register for EN 250. The 
requirements of this course may not be met by special examination. This course may not count 
toward a major or minor in English. 

EN 301 , 302 Survey of American Literature (W) 3,3 hours 

A study of major American poets and prose writers and main currents of thought to which they 
contributed. Prerequisite: EN 112. 

EN 304 Advanced Composition (W) 3 hours 

An intensive study designed to develop the writing skills of students through advanced rhetorical 
strategies. When EN 304 is taken at Oakwood College, a grade of B or better exempts a student 
from the English Proficiency Examination. Prerequisites: EN 112, junior standing, and 
completion of the literature requirement (EN 201 , EN 21 1 , EN 21 2, EN 301 or EN 302). 

EN 305 Biblical Literature (W) 3 hours 

A study of selected books from the Old and New Testaments, with emphasis on their literary value 
and with consideration of the place of the Bible in world literature. Prerequisite: EN 1 1 2. Offered 
alternate years. 

EN 311 Theory and Practice in Literary Criticism (W) 3 hours 

An introduction to literary theory from Plato to Foucault. Emphasis is placed on the relationship 
between literature and otherdisciplines in the humanities and the social sciences, and howthese 
disciplines influence the production, canonization, interpretation, and analysis of texts. The 
reading includes adolescent literature to illustrate Plato's views on the literary education of young 
minds. Prerequisites: EN 201 and any two of EN 21 1 , EN 212, EN 301 , or En 302. 

EN 320, 321 African-American Literature I, II (W) 3, 3 hours 

A survey designed to introduce the student to literature written by Black writers. EN 320 covers 
the period up to 1 945; EN 321 covers 1 945 to the present. Prerequisite: EN 201 , 211 , 21 2, 
301 , or 302. 

EN 323 Twentieth Century American Literature (W) 3 hours 

An introduction to major American writers of the twentieth century, with emphasis on modernism 
and post-modernism, and their implication forChristian morality. Prerequisites: EN 211, EN 21 2, 
EN 301 , or EN 302 and junior standing. 

116 



Approved Pre-professional Practice Program (AP4) 

Upon completion of the undergraduate dietetics degree, graduates are eligible to enter a 
supervised practice program (an AP4 or internship). Successful completion of this program will 
qualify them to take the registration exam to become a registered dietitian, which is a professional 
status conferred by the American Dietetic Association (ADA). Oakwood College's AP4 program 
provides a minimum of 900 hours of supervised practice and follows the ADA minimum academic 
requirements. The Council on Education Division of Education Accreditation/Approval also 
approves the program. 

Bachelor of Science in Family and Consumer Sciences 

This program provides the students with holistic concepts of family and consumer sciences. 
Courses in apparel and design, child development, family economics, home management, 
nutrition, and parent education are included in the curriculum. Students are prepared for graduate 
study, cooperative extension work, and business careers. 

Major Requirements: 

FS 101 Introduction to Family and Consumer Sciences 1 hour 

FS 111 Food Preparation 3 hours 

FS 131 Nutrition 3 hours 

FS 151 Fashion Sewing Selection 3 hours 

FS 152 Fashion Sewing and Textiles 3 hours 

FS 201 Art in Life 3 hours 

FS 21 1 Social and Professional Ethics 1 hour 

FS 221 Home Management 3 hours 

FS 305 Parenting 3 hours 

FS 340 Family Economics and Management 3 hours 

FS 342 Family Living 3 hours 

FS 355 Human Development 3 hours 

FS 401 Dress Design 3 hours 

FS 411 Housing and Interiors 3 hours 

FS 421 Quantity Food Management 3 hours 

FS 441 Home Management Practicum 3 hours 

FS 453 Senior Seminar 1 hour 

FS Electives 12 hours 

CH 101 Introduction to Inorganic Chemistry 3 hours 

Total 60 hours 



Bachelor of Science in Family and Consumer Science Education 

This program qualifies a person to teach secondary school family and consumer sciences. 
After graduation, students may apply for the Alabama Class B Certificate: Family and Consumer 
Sciences, grades 7-1 2; and the SDA Basic Teaching Certificate: Family and Consumer Sciences, 
grades 7-1 2. 

Refer to the Department of Education section in this bulletin for the program outline. Advisor: 
R. Davis. 



123 



Bachelor of Science in Human Development and Family Studies 

This program focuses on the family and relationships throughout the life cycle in a setting of 
multicultural forces. This curriculum prepares students for careers in child development, family life, 
government, social services agencies, and businesses which specialize in goods and services for 
the family. 

Majors who desire to teach in the primary grades but have not completed a traditional teacher 
education program may obtain teacher certification in early childhood education or early childhood 
education for the handicapped by entering the Alabama nontraditional fifth-year program at the 
University of Alabama in Huntsville or Alabama A & M University. 

Major Requirements: 

FS 101 Introduction to Family and Consumer Sciences 1 hour 

FS 111 Food Preparation 3 hours 

FS 131 Nutrition 3 hours 

FS 210 Principles of Early Childhood Education 3 hours 

FS 221 Home Management 3 hours 

FS 231 Developing Creativity in Young Children 3 hours 

FS 302 Preschool Environments 3 hours 

FS 305 Parenting 3 hours 

FS 340 Family Economics and Management 3 hours 

FS 342 Family Living 3 hours 

FS 355 Human Development 3 hours 

FS 358 Infant and Toddler Developmental Studies 3 hours 

FS 403 Child Development Practicum 3 hours 

FS 404 Administration and Supervision of Preschools 3 hours 

FS 441 Home Management Practicum 3 hours 

FS 452 Advanced Family Studies 3 hours 

FS453 Senior Seminar 1 hour 

FS 454 Internship in Human Development and Family Studies 3 hours 

FS Electives 6 hours 

SW312 Minority Aging 3 hours 

ED 341 Foundations of Reading 3 hours 

Total 62 hours 



Minor in Apparel and Design 

FS 151 Fashion Sewing Selection 3 hours 

FS 152 Fashion Sewing and Textiles 3 hours 

FS 201 Art in Life 3 hours 

FS351 Tailoring 3 hours 

FS 401 Apparel Design 3 hours 

FS411 Housing and Interiors 3 hours 

Total 18 hours 



124 



Minor in Child Development 

FS 231 Developing Creativity in Young Children 3 hours 

FS 210 Principles of Early Childhood Education 3 hours 

FS 302 Preschool Environments 3 hours 

FS 305 Parenting 3 hours 

FS 355 Human Development 3 hours 

FS 358 Infant and Toddler Development Studies 3 hours 

FS 403 Child Development Practicum 3 hours 

Total 21 hours 



Minor in Food and Nutrition 

FS 111 Food Preparation 3 hours 

FS 131 Nutrition 3 hours 

FS 355 Human Development 3 hours 

FS 360 Vegetarian Cuisine 3 hours 

FS Electives (upper division) 6 hours 

Total 18 hours 

Minor in Family and Consumer Sciences 

FS 111 Food Preparation 3 hours 

FS 151 Fashion Sewing Selection 3 hours 

FS 221 Home Management 3 hours 

FS 305 Parenting 3 hours 

FS 342 Family Living 3 hours 

FS 355 Human Development 3 hours 

FS Electives (upper division) 3 hours 

Total 21 hours 



Description of Courses 

FS 101 Introduction to Family and Consumer Sciences 1 hour 

A sun/ey of family and consumer sciences as a field of study, its organizational framework, 
growth and expansion, and present status; exploration of career opportunities in family and 
consumer sciences and in related disciplines that utilize home economics and skills. 

FS 111 Food Preparation 3 hours 

The selection, care, composition, and preparation of foods. One laboratory each week. 

FS 131 Nutrition 3 hours 

Basic principles of human nutrition, including nutrients and allowances for various ages and 
normal stress conditions. Carries credit toward the general education requirement in science. 

FS 151 Fashion Sewing Selection 3 hours 

Artistic and economic factors are studied and applied to clothing for the family. Emphasis is 
placed on planning, buying, alteration, cost, and care of clothing. This course offers students 
opportunities in construction of garments for the family, using patterns to develop speed and 
confidence. 



125 



FS 152 Fashion Sewing and Textiles 3 hours ^ 

The impact of technology on textile fibers and fabric structure, recognition of fiber properties, ^ 

and finishing processes as they apply to construction and selection of clothing. ^ 

m 

FS 201 Art in Life 3 hours ^ 

Designed to develop an understanding of basic guidelines for an aesthetic appreciation of art ^ 

in today's world. To increase enjoyment in art and to produce freedom of expression. i^ 

FS 210 Principles of Early Childhood Education 3 hours ^ 

A course designed to give the prospective teacher an understanding of the principles and (^ 

procedures employed in the organization, management, and supervision of an early childhood ^ 

education program. ^ 

FS 211 Social and Professional Ethics 1 hour ^ 

A course designed to develop an understanding of the current social code for both men and ^ 

women and to provide experience in its application to college life, home, and community living. ^ 

Acceptable modes of interacting in social and professional situations are presented. ^^ 

FS 221 Home Management 3 hours if^ 

A study of management of time, energy, finance, food, clothing, health, and recreation in ^ 

homemaking and family life. ^ 

FS 231 Developing Creativity in Young Children 3 hours ^ 

Development of creativity and self-expression in children through stories, music, rhymes, play ^ 

activities, and creative media. One three-hour laboratory is required each week. |^ 

FS 301 Experimental Foods 3 hours ^ 

Research methods applied to individual and class problems in food preparation. Laboratory ffj^ 

included. Prerequisites: FS 111 and CH 141. ^ 

FS 302 Preschool Environments 3 hours |^ 

Examination of preschool programs in alternative environments, including criteria for physical ^^ 

facilities, child health and safety, personnel and licensing, management of finances, and current ^ 

legislation. Prerequisite: junior standing. |^ 

FS 305 Parenting 3 hours ^ 

Current theories related to the effects of various parenting methods. Emphasis on designing ^^ 

a learning environment within the home for the holistic development of the child. Prerequisite: ^ 

junior standing. ^^ 

FS 321 Advanced Nutrition (W) 3 hours ^ 

A study of the physiological and chemical factors involved in the absorption and metabolism of ^^ 

food nutrients and how these factors apply to normal nutrition. Prerequisites: FS433, BI112 |^ 

and CH 312. ^ 

FS 322 Community Nutrition I 3 hours 0B 

This course is designed to prepare students for community service while addressing public ^^ 

health issues. Principles of communication, counseling, and nutritional requirements through- ^^ 

out the life cycle are covered. Prerequisites FS 1 31 , BI1 1 2 and junior standing. ^ 



126 



FS 323 Community Nutrition II 3 hours 

This course is designed to prepare students for community service while addressing entrepre- 
neurship, multiculturalism, health care, legislation, nutrition policy and program planning. 
Prerequisites: FS 322 and junior standing. 

FS 340 Family Economics and Management 3 hours 

A study of supply and demand, consumer welfare, credit, protection and legal regulations, and 
current issues which affect the individual's total responsibility as a consumer in today's 
changing economic environment. Prerequisite: junior standing. 

FS342 Family Living (W) 3 hours 

Evaluation of membership in a social structure created to benefit each person as a contributor 
to the family and to society in their physical, mental, and religious aspects. Prerequisite: FS 
355. 

FS 351 Tailoring 3 hours 

Principles involved in making suits and coats for men and women. Open only to those who show 
skill in the construction of garments. Prerequisite: FS 1 51 or by approval. 

FS 355 Human Development 3 hours 

A study of the physical, mental, emotional, and social development of the individual from 
conception through senescence, with particular emphasis on normal adaptation to change and 
learning processes. Observation and laboratory are required. Prerequisite: junior standing. 

FS 358 Infant and Toddler Development 3 hours 

An in-depth study of infants and toddlers, with special emphasis on developing and setting up 
creative programs for infants and toddlers. Observation and participation in infant and toddler 
programs required. Prerequisite: junior standing. 

FS 360 Vegetarian Cuisine 3 hours 

A study of foods, cookery, nutrition, and demonstration techniques as they apply to planning 
nutritionally balanced meals based upon a vegetarian diet. Laboratory included. Prerequi- 
sites: FS111 and FS 131. 

FS 401 Apparel Design 3 hours 

A course involving principles of draping and flat pattern design and their practical applications 
in sewing for men and women. Current construction techniques and individualized fitting are 
stressed. Prerequisite: FS151. 

FS 403 Child Development Practicum 3 hours 

Effective methods of working with children, impact of teacher behavior on the behavior of the 
children, teacher-parent and teacher-teacher relationships. Two lectures and six hours of 
observation and participation in a child development laboratory program are required each 
week. Prerequisites: FS 210, 231 , 302, 355, and 358. 

FS 404 Administration and Supervision of Preschools 3 hours 

Development center: essential planning procedures, including curriculum, guidance, health 
protection, housing, equipment, food service, budgeting, parent-staff relations , social services, 
and community relations. Six hours of laboratory are required each week. Prerequisite: FS 
403. 



127 



FS 411 Housing and Interiors 3 hours 

A study of the principles of planning housing and living environments in relation to needs, 
resources, and lifestyles of individuals and families at all stages of the life cycle. Prerequisite: 
FS201. 

FS 421 Quantity Food Management 3 hours 

Introduction to the responsibilities of first-level food service supervisors in quantity food service; 
includes planning, preparation, service, and safety of acceptable nutritionally adequate meals 
at designated budgetary levels. Laboratory experience in quantity food production. Prereq- 
uisites: FS 1 1 1 and junior standing. 

FS 431 Food Systems Management 3 hours 

Introduction to food services, principles of organization and management, financial control, 
equipment selection, layout in institutional food service, and technical operations. Prerequi- 
sites: FS 421 and junior standing. 

FS 433 Community Nutrition 3 hours 

A study of the nutrition care service delivery system within the community, with emphasis upon 
nutritional assessment, planning, intervention, evaluation, education, and the legislative 
process. Community service learning laboratory included. Prerequisites: FS 1 31 , Bl 1 1 2 and 
junior standing. 

FS 438 Clinical Nutrition I 3 hours 

Introduction of clinical experience in dietetics, understanding and applying clinical laboratory 
values, nuthtional assessment, quality improvement while utilizing medical nutritional therapy. 
Laboratory practice included. Prerequisites: CH 31 1 , Bl 1 12, FS 323. 

FS 439 Clinical Nutrition II 3 hours 

Introduction of clinical experience in dietetics, understanding and applying clinical laboratory 
values, nutritional assessment, medical nutritional therapy, Adventist beliefs and professional 
conduct in patient care. Laboratory experience included. 

FS 440 Clinical Nutrition (W) 3 hours 

The principles of nutrition applied to physiological conditions altered by disease and abnormali- 
ties. Nutritional assessment techniques, nutrition care strategies, and diet therapy will be 
emphasized. Laboratory included. Prerequisite: FS321. 

FS 441 Home Management Practicum 3 hours 

Cooperative living in homemaking groups in the home management house. Experience is given 
in management, accounting, food preparation and services, aesthetic arrangements, and 
entertaining. Charges are based on prevailing food costs. Registration required in the 
department office one semester in advance. Prerequisites: FS 1 1 1 , 340, and departmental 
senior, or permission of instructor. 

FS 442 Occupational Family and Consumer Science 3 hours 

A course designed to provide supen/ised occupational work experience in family and consumer 
sciences. Prerequisite: FS421. 

FS 452 Advanced Family Studies (W) 3 hours 

A comparative study of families internationally, utilizing the United States as a framework. 
Special attention will be given to developing countries, eastern Europe, and the Far East. 
Prerequisites: FS 342 and departmental senior, or permission of instructor. 

128 



FS 453 Senior Seminar 1 liour 

A study of professional organizations, meetings, and publications in all areas of family and 
consumer sciences. Includes resume writing and job search. Prerequisite: Departmental 
senior or permission of instructor. 

FS 454 Internship in Human Development and Family Studies 3 hours 

Organized opportunities for work experience in cooperative extension services and family 
agencies. Prerequisite: departmental senior or permission of instructor. 

FS 490-491 Research and Independent Study each 1-3 hours 

Individual research. Limited to majors. Prerequisites: departmental senior and prior approval 
by department chair. 




129 



Department of Health and Physical Education 



Professors: Lovejoy, Shaw (Chair) 

Assistant Professors: Henry, Roddy, Sovyanhadi 
Instructor: Hamilton 



Majors: Health Science (B.S.) 

Fitness and Wellness (B.S.) 

Health and Physical Education (B.S.) 

Health and Physical Education Teaching (B.S.) 

Minor: Health and Physical Education 



Purpose: 

It is the purpose of the Department of Health and Physical Education to provide instruction in 
health education and a variety of physical activity and theory courses. These courses are designed 
to promote healthful living and physical fitness, as well as knowledge and skill development. 



Application for Admission: 

To be admitted as a major in the Department of Health and Physical Education, students must 
have completed at least 32 hours of course work, including EN 1 1 2 Freshman Composition and four 
hours of physical education. Applicants must have an overall minimum GPA of 2.00 and have a 
minimum GPA of 2.25 in physical education courses. Application forms must be obtained from, and 
returned to, the department. 



Exit Examination: 

Seniors are required to take and pass at the 80th percentile an exit examination from the 
department. 



Career Opportunities: 

Graduates in this department may have careers as coaches, fitness specialists, health 
educators, intramural directors, parks and recreation programmers, sports medicine personnel, 
teachers, and water safety instructors. A B.S. degree in Health Science offers a broad study of 
health care and provides the academic preparation required for graduate training. 

Bachelor of Science in Fitness and Wellness 

Major Requirements: 

PE 101 Physical Conditioning 1 hour 

PE 155 Aerobics 1 hour 

PE205 First Aid and CPR 1 hour 

PE211 Health Principles 2 hours 

130 



PE 270 Water Safety Instructor 2 hours 

PE 280 Weight Training 1 hour 

PE 285 Introduction to Physical Education 3 hours 

PE 310 Athletic Injuries 2 hours 

PE 315 Motor Learning 2 hours 

PE 320 Fitness Testing 2 hours 

PE 340 Organization and Administration of Physical Ed 3 hours 

PE 401 Physiology of Exercise 3 hours 

PE 410 Adapted Physical Education 2 hours 

PE 41 5 Kinesiology 3 hours 

PE 421 Health Promotion 3 hours 

PE 422 Fitness Management 3 hours 

PE 490 Research and Independent Study 3 hours 

PE Activity Electives 3 hours 

PE Electives 3 hours 

AR 204 Desktop Graphic Design 3 hours 

BA 105 Introduction to Business 3 hours 

Bl 1 1 1 Anatomy and Physiology 3 hours 

Bl 1 12 Anatomy and Physiology 3 hours 

FS 131 Nutrition 3 hours 

PY421 Counseling Skills 3 hours 

Total 61 hours 



Bachelor of Science in Health Science 



Major Requirements: 



PE 205 First Aid and CPR 1 hour 

PE211 Health Principles 2 hours 

PE 280 Weight Training 1 hour 

PE 315 Motor Learning 2 hours 

PE 320 Fitness Testing 2 hours 

PE 335 Physical Education Test and Measurements 3 hours 

PE 401 Physiology of Exercise 3 hours 

PE 410 Adapted Physical Education 2 hours 

PE415 Kinesiology 3 hours 

PE421 Health Promotion 3 hours 

PE 450 Epidemology and Disease Control 3 hours 

PE 490 and 491 Research and Independent Study 6 hours 

AH 103 Introduction to Public Health 2 hours 

AH 250 Medical Terminology 2 hours 

Bl 111-112 Human Anatomy and Physiology 6 hours 

Bl 131-132 General Biology and Lab 8 hours 

CH 102 Introduction to Organic and Biochemistry and Lab 3 hours 

ED 250 Philosophy of Christian Education 2 hours 

FS 131 Nutrition 3 hours 

HC325 Introduction to Health Services Administration 3 hours 

HC 330 Legal Aspects and Ethics of Health Care 3 hours 

MA 101 Fundamental Concepts of Math 3 hours 

NU 105 Pharmacology 1 hour 



131 



NU 106 Non-Drug Therapeutics 3 hours 

NU 41 1 Community Health Nursing 5 hours 

PY 101 Principles of Psychology 3 hours 

PY 347 Health Psychology 3 hours 

Total 81 hours 



Bachelor of Science in Health and Physical Education 

Major Requirements: 

PE 205 First Aid and CPR 1 hour 

PE 21 1 Health Principles 2 hours 

PE 226-227 Team Sports I and II 6 hours 

PE 275 Gymnastics 1 hour 

PE 285 Introduction to Physical Education 3 hours 

PE 301-302 Individual and Dual Sports I and II 6 hours 

PE 305 Officiating Athletic Contests 2 hours 

PE 310 Athletic Injuries 2 hours 

PE 315 Motor Learning 2 hours 

PE 330 Methods of Teaching Physical Education 3 hours 

PE 335 Physical Education Test and Measurements 3 hours 

PE 340 Administration of Physical Education 3 hours 

PE 401 Physiology of Exercise 3 hours 

PE 410 Adapted Physical Education 2 hours 

PE 415 Kinesiology 3 hours 

PE Activity Electives 3 hours 

PE Electives 6 hours 

Bl 111-112 Human Anatomy and Physiology 6 hours 

FS 131 Nutrition 3 hours 

Total 60 hours 



Bachelor of Science in Teaching Health and Physical Education 

This program qualifies a person to teach physical education. After graduation, students may 
apply for the Alabama Class B Certificate: Physical Education, grades P-1 2; and the SDA Basic 
Teaching Certificate: Physical Education, grades P-1 2. 

Refer to the Department of Education section in this bulletin for the program outline. Program 
advisor: H. Shaw. 

Minor in Health and Physical Education 

PE Activities - Select one course from each of these areas: 

aquatics, fitness, individual sports, and team sports 4 hours 

PE 205 First Aid and CPR 1 hour 

PR 285 Introduction to Physical Education 3 hours 

PE 305 Officiating Athletic Contests 3 hours 



132 



PE 310 Athletic Injuries 3 hours 

PE 340 Organization and Administration of Physical Education 3 hours 

PEEIectives 2 hours 

Total 19 hours 

Description of Courses 

PE 101 Physical Conditioning 1 hour 

Skills, methods, and exercises for attaining muscular and cardiorespiratory fitness. 

PE 102 Basic Swimming 1 hour 

This course is designed to teach the basic swimming skills and to overcome fear of the water. 

PE 107 Aerobic Swimming 1 hour 

A course designed for the swimmer that emphasizes the benefits of continuous exercise. 
Special emphasis will be placed on developing strength in different body areas and enhancing 
the cardiovascularfitness of the student. This class takes the learned aspects of the swimming 
strokes and applies them to the student's overall fitness level. Prerequisite: PE 102 or 
permission of the instructor. 

PE 120 Flag Football 1 hour 

An introduction to the skills and rules of flag football. 

PE 122 Basketball 1 hour 

An introduction to the skills and rules of basketball. 

PE 126 Softball 1 hour 

An introduction to the skills and rules of softball. 

PE 128 Volleyball 1 hour 

An introduction to the skills and rules of volleyball. 

PE 150 Badminton 1 hour 

An introduction to the skills and rules of badminton. 

PE 155 Aerobics 1 hour 

Exercises designed for the development of cardiopulmonary endurance and muscular fitness. 

PE 1 90 -1 91 -1 92 Independent Activity 1 -1 -1 hour 

Independent activity classes forthose with disabilities and others with special needs under the 
direction of a physical education advisor. Prerequisite: permission of department chair. 

PE 205 Standard First Aid and CPR 1 hour 

This course will prepare the student to recognize emergencies and how to respond to them. 
It will also provide an in-depth study of CPR, including practice sessions on a manikin. 
Participation in all class activities is required. 

PE 207 Intermediate Swimming 1 hour 

Perfecting of the American crawl and elementary backstroke, learning and developing skills of 
the sidestroke, breaststroke, back crawl, and inverted breast stroke. Prerequisite: perform 
basic strokes well, tread water, and be comfortable in deep water. 



133 



PE 21 Lifeguard Training 2 hours 

Covers the requirements for Red Cross Advanced Lifesaving certification. Prerequisite: PE 
207 or equivalent performance ability. This course may receive one hour of PE activity. 

PE 21 1 Health Principles 2 hours 

A practical study of the principles of healthful living, including a study of the basic physiological 
processes. The health instructions found in the writing of Mrs. E. G. White are given special 
emphasis. 

PE 222 Racquetball I 1 hour 

An introduction to the techniques, skills, and methods of racquetball. The proper attire, eye 
goggles and nonscuffing gym shoes, is required. 

PE 224 Soccer 1 hour 

An introduction to the basic skills and rules of soccer. 

PE 226-227 Team Sports I and II 3-3 hours 

Organization, administration, and teaching progression of selected team sports. Prerequisite: 
previous experience in playing four of the following: flagball, softball, soccer, basketball, 
volleyball, field hockey, or team handball. 

PE 245 Tennis I 1 hour 

An introduction to the skills and rules of tennis. 

PE 247 Racquetball II 1 hour 

After beginning racquetball skill acquisition, Racquetball II provides the opportunity to develop 
offensive and defensive shots to a higher skill level. Prerequisite: PE 222 or permission of 
instructor. 

PE 249 Tennis II 1 hour 

This course is designed for the intermediate to advanced tennis player. Special emphasis will 
be placed upon skill, performance, and ability levels of each individual participant. Prerequisite: 
PE 245 or permission of the instructor. 

PE 250 Tumbling 1 hour 

The analysis and practice of elementary stunts and tumbling, including spotting and safety 
techniques. 

PE 260 Golf I 1 hour 

Introduction to golfing. Equipment supplied. 

PE 261 Golf II 1 hour 

The natural progression of golf instruction forthe student interested in pursuing golf as a lifetime 
activity. This course is designed for the intermediate to advanced golfer. Emphasis will be 
placed upon skill, performance, and ability levels. Prerequisite: PE 260 or permission of the 
instructor. 

PE 270 Water Safety Instructor 2 hours 

Covers the requirements for Red Cross Water Safety Instructor certification. Prerequisite: PE 
210 



134 



PE 275 -276 Gymnastics Team 1 -1 hour 

Culminates with public performance of skills on parallel bars, rings, unevens, balance beam, 
and mats. Prerequisite: Satisfactory performance of tryout requirements. 

PE 280 Weight Training 1 hour 

This is a body-building class based on the use of weight resistance experiences. 

PE 285 Introduction to Physical Education 3 hours 

A brief historical study of the physiological, psychological, and sociological basis of physical 
education and an analysis of its aims, objectives, and principles. 

PE 301-302 Individual and Dual Sports I and II 3-3 hours 

Organization, administration, and teaching progression of selected individual sports. Prereq- 
uisite: previous experience in playing four of the following: aquatics, badminton, golf, gymnas- 
tics, racquetball, tennis, and track and field. 

PE 305 Officiating Athletic Contests 2 hours 

Theory and practice in officiation at team sports, interpretation of rules, officiating techniques, 
examinations, and ratings. Prerequisite: previous experience in playing basketball, flag football 
or field hockey, and softball and volleyball. All students in these classes will be assigned to 
officiate for intramural programs of the college. 

PE 308 Theory of Coaching (W) 2 hours 

This course is designed to assist the student in developing the background and skills neces- 
sary to coach selected sports. Offered alternate years. Prerequisites: PE 226 and EN 103. 

PE 31 Athletic Injuries 2 hours 

The care and prevention of athletic injuries, including certification in first aid and cardiopulmo- 
nary resuscitation. Offered alternate years. Prerequisites: PE 205 and Bl 111. 

PE 315 Motor Learning 2 hours 

Study and analyze the selected variables which influence the learning of motor skills. 
Prerequisite: junior standing. 

PE 320 Fitness Testing 2 hours 

This course is designed to enhance the understanding of fitness and the scientific aspects of 
evaluating fitness levels, and focuses on the hands-on application of advanced fitness testing. 
Tests include, but are not limited to, body fat analysis (hydrostatic weighing), treadmill stress 
testing, strength analysis, flexibility testing, lung capacity, nutrition analysis, stress profile, and 
varied other fitness and wellness evaluations. Requiring the student to understand how to 
administer these tests to each other is preparation for administering these and other tests in 
areas such as health clubs, hospital settings, and corporate fitness. This course is also 
preparation for academic environment application at the elementary, secondary, and college 
level. Prerequisite: PE101. 

PE 330 Methods of Teaching Physical Education in 3 hours 

Elementary and Secondary Schools 

Development of physical education programs on the elementary and secondary level . Methods 
and materials for games of low organization, team and individual sports, and self-testing 
activities. Prerequisite: junior standing. 



135 



PE 335 Physical Education Tests and l\/leasurements (W) 3 hours 

Tests and evaluation in physical education: emphasis on test administration and application of 
results. Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: MA 101. 

PE 340 Organization and Admin, of Physical Education (W) 2 hours 

The relationship of the field of physical education to modern education. Theory and practice of 
the organization and administration of physical education activities, including intramurals. 
Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: PE 285. 

PE 401 Physiology of Exercise (W) 3 hours 

A study of the response of the body to exercise. Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: Bl 1 1 1 . 



PE 410 Adapted Physical Education (W) 2 hours 

A study of abnormalities found in students which may be helped or corrected by exercise. 
Activities for the handicapped. Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: junior standing. 

PE 415 Kinesiology 3 hours 

A study of joint and muscular mechanism action involved in movement. Also, the effect of 
gravity and other forces in motion. Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: Bl 111. 

PE 421 Health Promotion 3 hours 

A study of the methods and structure involved in promoting all aspects of health. The student 
will explore the different areas of health and the specific ways to promote those areas to different 
populations. Included in the course content will be actual promotion of on-campus health 
activities, including but not limited to, stress-reduction seminars, exercise evaluation clinics, 
and a wellness day experience. The student will also obtain the skill necessary to manage a 
group of volunteer employees and learn the concepts of health management. Prerequisite: PE 
211. 

PE 422 Fitness Management 3 hours 

This course will emphasize the employment aspects of fitness and wellness as they relate to 
health. Each student will be placed in a local health or wellness facility for the purpose of 
experiencing the workings of that facility — from the business aspects to the maintenance of the 
building. Contracts, staffing, promotion, and budgeting will be the focus areas foreach student. 
The grading of the student will be a combined effort between the facility manager and site visits 
from the professor in charge of the practicum. Prerequisite: PE 285. 

PE 450 Epidemiology and Disease Control 3 hours 

A study of the general principles of disease etiology and the technique for their surveillance and 
control, with emphasis on the application of epidemiological measurements of disease 
frequency occurrence and distribution in human population and the use of measures in health 
care. Prerequisite: junior standing. 

PE 490-91 Research and Independent Study each 1-3 hours 

Individual research under the guidance of an instructor. Limited to physical education majors. 
Prerequisite: junior standing and prior approval of the department chair. 



136 



Department of History 

Professors: Barham, Sepulveda (Chair) 

Assistant Professor: Smith-Winbush 

Majors: History (B.A.) 

International Studies (B.A.) 
Social Science Education (B.S.) 

Minors: African American Studies 

History 
Political Science 



Introduction 

The Department of History comprises areas of study In various fields of history, political science, 
and geography. Courses are designed to meet the questions of the past and the problems of the 
contemporary world in areas of American, Latin American, European, African, and Christian church 
history. Political science courses are built around the various structures and concepts of politics, 
government, diplomacy, and international relations. Three survey courses are offered in cultural, 
physical, and regional geography. 



Purpose 

It is the purpose of the Department of History to prepare students to use the discipline of history 
and international studies as analytical tools to understand the dynamics of today's ever-changing 
and complex society. Courses in American history, Latin America, Europe, Africa, political science, 
and church history, along with student-teacher interaction, will provide ethical values and a 
knowledge base that will meet the department's purpose. The course offerings provide graduates 
with the skills needed to be competitive in graduate school, law school, and research. The 
knowledge gleaned from the courses taught in the department will promote a sound academic 
background and both spiritual and moral values. In addition, the student will learn to appreciate the 
diversity of a growing multicultural world society. 



Application for Admission 

To be admitted as a major in the Department of History, students must have completed at least 
40 hours of course work, including EN 1 1 2 Freshman Composition, H1 1 03 or 1 04 World Civilization, 
and HI 21 1 or 212 United States History. Applicants must also have an overall minimum GPA of 
2.00 and a minimum GPA of 2.25 in the history courses. 



Exit Examinations 

Candidates for the B.A. degree must pass a departmental exit examination in their senior year 
with a minimum grade of C-i-. This examination consists of both written and oral sections. Students 
will also be required to take one of the national standardized tests (e.g., the GRE), but the score 
will not affect the student's graduation. 



137 



Career Opportunities 

Many graduates in history attend law school; others choose graduate school for careers in 
teaching and research. They may also find rewarding careers in governmental agencies such as 
the Department of State, the Diplomatic Corps, private industry, foundations, archives, and criminal 
justice organizations. 



Bachelor of Arts in History 

IVIajor Requirements: 

HI 103 World Civilization 3 hours 

HI 104 World Civilization 3 hours 

HI 211 U.S. History 3 hours 

HI 212 U.S. History 3 hours 

HI 319 Colonial Latin America or HI 320 Recent Latin America 3 hours 

HI 321 History of England I or HI 322 History of England II 3 hours 

HI 325 African Civilization or HI 364 West African Civilization 3 hours 

HI 459 Recent America or HI 460 America in the Industrial Age 3 hours 

HI 468 Age of Revolution or HI 469 Modern Europe 3 hours 

HI 480 Research Seminar 3 hours 

HI 490 Independent Study 3 hours 

HI Electives (3 hours must be upper division) 9 hours 

PS Elective 3 hours 

Total... 45 hours 

Minor Required 18-21 hours 

Bachelor of Arts in International Studies 

Major Requirements: 

GE 202 Cultural Geography or GE 302 Regional Geography 3 hours 

HI 104 World Civilization 3 hours 

HI 212 U.S. History 3 hours 

HI 319 Latin America or HI 320 Recent Latin America 3 hours 

HI 323 British Commonwealth or HI 469 Modern Europe 3 hours 

HI 325 African Civilization or HI 364 West African Civilization 3 hours 

HI 459 Recent America or HI 460 America in the Industrial Age 3 hours 

HI 480 Research Seminar or PS 480 Research Seminar 3 hours 

HI 490 Independent Study or PS 490 Independent Study 3 hours 

PS 120 Introduction to Political Science 3 hours 

PS 200 Comparative Governments 3 hours 

PS 351 or PS 352 Public Policy 3 hours 

PS 440 International Relations 3 hours 

PS 450 American Diplomacy 3 hours 

BA 385 International Business 3 hours 

EC 282 Microeconomics or EC 283 Macroeconomics 3 hours 

EN 201 World Literature 3 hours 

PR 201-202 Intermed. French or SP 201-202 Informed. Spanish 6 hours 



138 



FS 452 Advanced Family Studies or 

SW 307 International Social Work 3 hours 

RE 345 World Religions 2 hours 

SO 101 Principles of Sociology 3 hours 

Total 62 hours 

*Minor Required 18-21 hours 

*Students minoring in history or political science are required to take at least 12 hours in 
addition to those included in the major. 

Bachelor of Science In Social Science Education 

This degree provides a comprehensive secondary school social science program, including 
economics, history, geography, political science, psychology, and sociology. After graduation, 
students may apply for the Alabama Class B Certificate: Social Science, grades 7-1 2; and the SDA 
Basic Teaching Certificate: Social Science grades 7-12. 

Refertothe Department of Education section of this bulletin forthe program outline. Program 
advisor: C. Sepulveda. 



Minor In African American Studies 

HI 165 African American History or HI 261 Black Diaspora 3 hours 

HI 325 African Civilization or HI 364 West African History 3 hours 

EN 320 or 321 African American Literature 3 hours 

Select from: HI 1 65 or HI 261 , HI 325 or HI 364 (see above), 

HI 265 Minorities in America, EN 251 Literature of African Peoples, EN 320 or 321 (see 
above), MU 323 African American Music, PY 431 Black Psychological Perspectives, 

and RE 211 Black Liturgy 11-12 hours 

Total 20-21 hours 

Minor in History 

HI 103 or HI 104 World Civilization 3 hours 

HI 211 or HI 212 U.S. History 3 hours 

HI 325 African Civilization or HI 364 West Africa 3 hours 

HI 459 Recent America or HI 460 America in the Industrial Age 3 hours 

HI 468 Age of Revolution or HI 469 Modern Europe 3 hours 

HI Electives (3 hours must be upper division, not 480 or 490) 6 hours 

Total 21 hours 



Minor in Political Science 

PS 120 Introduction to Political Science 3 hours 

PS 200 Comparative Gov't, or PS 440 International Relations 3 hours 

PS 21 1 American Gov't, or PS 300 State and Local Gov't 3 hours 

PS 351 or PS 352 Public Policy I or II 3 hours 

PS 471 or PS 472 U. S. Constitutional Law I or II 3 hours 

PS Electives (12 hours upper divivision are required, not 480 or 490) 6 hours 

Total 21 hours 



139 



Description of Courses , 

Geography ( 

GE 201 Pliysical Geography 3 hours 

A survey course designed to help the student understand the vital relationship between man ^ 

and the physical environment. ^ 

GE 202 Cultural Geography 3 hours ( 

An anthropological and environmental study of the interaction between humans and their i 
environment, dealing with the origin and diffusion of man, race, and culture. The evolution of 

man's institutions from the earliest times to the present. Problems of urban growth, population ( 

explosion, pollution, food shortages, and environmental concerns. a 

GE 302 Regional Geography 3 hours ( 

A study of the world's major geopolitical regions and the interaction of their cultures with the i 
climate, resources, industrial development, and environment. Prerequisite: GE 201. 



History 

H1 103 World Civilization I 3 hours 

A survey course that investigates the great movements of history from ancient times to A.D. 
1650. 

H1 1 04 World Civilization II 3 hours 

A survey course that investigates the great movements of history from the era of A.D. 1 650 to 
the present time. 

H1 165 African American History 3 hours 

A survey of the Black diaspora, with emphasis on their experience in the United States from the 
ancient kingdoms of West Africa. 

HI 21 1 United States History I 3 hours 

A survey of modernizing, pluralist American society and Amehca in the international commu- 
nity, 1607 to 1877. 

HI 21 2 United States History II 3 hours 

A sun/ey of modernizing, pluralist American society and America in the international commu- 
nity, 1877 to the present . 

HI 261 Black Diaspora 3 hours 

A comparative study on the scattehng, the plantation experience, the post-Emancipation 
period, and the continuing struggle for the equality of Blacks in Latin America, the Caribbean, 
and the United States. 

HI 265 Minorities in America 3 Hours 

An examination of the struggles and contributions of women and such minorities as African- 
Americans, Native Americans, Hispanics and Asians in the United States. 



140 



HI 314 Denominational History (W) 3 hours 

A survey course of the rise and progress of the Seventh-day Adventist Church. Prerequisite: 
HI 104 or 211. 

HI 31 9 Colonial Latin America (W) 3 hours 

A survey of Spanish and Portuguese America from the arrival of Columbus to 1820. The 
Caribbean region will also be studied. Prerequisite: HI 104. 

HI 320 Recent Latin America/Caribbean 3 hours 

An analysis of Latin America's authoritarianism and economics, and the U.S. and Soviet 
influence in the region from 1 820 to the present. The decline and end of European/British rule 
in the Caribbean over the same period. Prerequisite: HI 104. 

HI 321 History of England I (W) 3 hours 

A study of the development of England from the Roman conquest to 1 660, with emphasis on 
the Tudors and early Stuarts period. Prerequisite: HI 103. 

HI 322 History of England II (W) 3 hours 

A study of the development of England and the British Empire from the Civil War to the present. 
Prerequisite: HI 104. 

HI 323 British Commonwealth 3 hours 

A study of the growth and decline of the British Empire and Commonwealth, with emphasis on 
the areas of Africa, Australia, Canada, the Caribbean, India, and Ireland. Prerequisite : H1 1 04. 

HI 325 African Civilization (W) 3 hours 

A survey of African civilization from the middle ages through the post colonial-period (1960). 
Prerequisite: HI 103 or 104. 

HI 364 West African Civilization (W) 3 hours 

A study of West Africa from approximately A. D. 1000 to the present. The period examines the 
rise and decline of ancient Ghana, Mali, and Songhay. It also examines the Black diaspora, 
European penetration of West Africa, and the West African response to colonialism. Prereq- 
uisite: HI 103 or 104. 

HI 444 History of the Christian Church (W) 3 hours 

A study of the formation and development of the Christian church until the thirteenth century, 
with particular emphasis on the first four centuries. Prerequisite: HI 1 03. 

HI 446 The Age of Reformation (W) 3 hours 

A study of the main events in European history from 1 450-1 650, with emphasis on the religious 
controversy. Prerequisite: HI 103. 

HI 459 Recent American History (W) 3 hours 

A pluralist study of modern American society and America in the international community, 1 930 
to the present. Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: HI 21 1 or 212. 

HI 460 America in the Industrial Age (W) 3 hours 

A pluralist study of modern American society and America in the international community, 1 877 
to 1930. Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: HI 211 or 21 2. 



141 



HI 468 The Age of Revolution (W) 3 hours 

A study of the main events in European liistory from 1 789-1 848, with emphasis on the French 
Revolution and Napoleon. Prerequisite: HI 104. 

HI 469 Modern Europe (W) 3 hours 

A study of the main events in European history from 1 900 to the present, with emphasis on 
England, France, Germany, Russia, imperialism, and the two World Wars. Prerequisite: HI 
104. 

HI 480 Research Seminar (W) 3 hours 

A major research paper in history under the supervision of the professor specializing in that 
area. Required of all history majors in their senior year. Prerequisite: senior history major. 

HI 490-491 Independent Study each 1-3 hours 

A reading and study course in selected history topics. May be taken only once from the same 
professor. Prerequisite: upper division history major. 



Political Science 

PS 1 20 Introduction to Political Science 3 hours 

An examination of the standard essentials of political science in which are considered certain 
contemporary political doctrines, systems of government, political organization and behavior, 
and a look at various worldwide governmental policies. 

PS 200 Comparative Governments 3 hours 

A study of selected nation-states in relation to their location on the globe as well as their capacity 
to provide their peoples with the economic, social, and political goods and services associated 
with human dignity. 

PS 21 1 American Government 3 hours 

A course of study concerning the organization of the United States government in regard to 
various branches at federal and state levels. 

PS 300 State and Local Government (W) 3 hours 

The study of the structure of state and local governments, including the historical development 
of local and regional governments in America. Prerequisite: PS 120. 

PS 351 , 352 Public Policy I, II (W) 3,3 hours 

An examination of the economic, political, social, and institutional factors which influence the 
policymaking process in the United States. Case studies will be reviewed in the areas of 
economics, health, welfare, civil rights, defense, criminal justice, education, and environmental 
issues. Prerequisite: PS 120. 

PS 440 International Relations (W) 3 hours 

A study of critical factors affecting the conduct of international relations. Emphasis is placed 
on nation-states, global and regional international organizations, multinational corporations, 
individuals in the international arena, and the forces they bring to bear on the international 
political system. Prerequisite: PS 120. , 



142 



PS 450 American Diplomacy (W) 3 hours 

A study of the key characteristics of U.S. foreign relations, what shapes them, the relationship 
between our nation's domestic setting-ideology, core values, politics, geography, social 
structure, and economy-and its foreign relations. Prerequisite: PS 120. 

PS 471 , 472 United States Constitutional Law I, II (W) 3,3 hours 

A study in the growth and development of the American constitutional system, with emphasis 
on the policy-making role of the Supreme Court. Prerequisite: HI 211 or 21 2. 

PS 480 Research Seminar 3 hours 

A major research paper under the supervision of the professor specializing in that area. 
Prerequisite: senior international studies major. 

PS 490 Independent Study 3 hours 

A reading and study course in selected international studies topics. Prerequisite: senior 
international studies major. 




143 



Department of Mathematics and Computer Science 



Professor: Blake (Chair) 

Associate Professor: Dobbins, Osei 

Assistant Professors: Monroe, Patel 

IVIajors: Applied Mathematics ( B.S.) 

Computer Science (B.S.) 
Mathematics (B.A.) 

Mathematics and Computer Science (B.A. 
Mathematics Education (B.S.) 

IVIinors: Computer Science 

Mathematics 



Physics 



Purpose 



It is the purpose of the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science to provide students 
with experiences which will assist them in defining their lives and career objectives. Course 
offerings, advisors, and day-to-day contact with faculty and other students contribute to this goal. 
The courses provide the necessary background which will allow students to pursue graduate work, 
teach secondary school, obtain employment in government and industry, and acquire mathematical 
tools for use in the physical, social, life, and management sciences. The department also provides 
for students' academic development, an intellectual environment, personal development, interper- 
sonal skills, and self-understanding. These goals reflect the department's philosophy, that the 
fostering of the intellectual growth and development of the students is our primary reason for being. 

High School Preparation 

Although many colleges provide remedial work in mathematics, potential mathematics majors 
will be at an advantage if they acquire skills in algebra, geometry, and trigonometry while in high 
school. These subjects are needed for traditional college calculus. 

Application for Admission 

To be admitted as a major in the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, students 
must have completed as least 32 hours of course work, including EN 1 1 2 Freshman Composition. 
Students must also have completed MA 1 71 -1 72 Calculus if a mathematics major, or CM 21 0, 220 
if a computer science major. Applicants must have an overall minimum GPA of 2.00 and a minimum 
GPA of 2.25 in mathematics or computer science. Application forms must be obtained from, and 
returned to, the department. 

Exit Examination 

All majors in the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science are required to pass an 
exit examination with at least a grade of C. This examination will be administered during the fall and 
spring semesters of their senior year. 



144 



Career Opportunities 

Careers available in mathematics are (1 ) in teaching: the public school system, the junior or 
community college system, and the college or university system; and (2) in industry: computer 
mathematician, operations researcher, statistician, classical engineering assistant, actuarial 
training, surveying assistant, research clerical accounting, and cartography. 

A degree in computer science will provide opportunities in teaching, industry, and government. 
Several firms employ persons to design and write programs for computer users. Computer 
manufacturers are major employers of well-trained computer scientists. A graduate degree in 
computer science or mathematics provides more opportunities in teaching and research. 



Bachelor of Science in Applied Mathematics/Engineering 

This is a cooperative dual degree program in which the student spends approximately three 
years at Oakwood College and approximately two years at the University of Alabama in Huntsville 
(UAH) or the University of Alabama in Birmingham (UAB). Following the successful completion of 
all requirements, the student will be awarded the degree of Bachelor of Science in Applied 
Mathematics from Oakwood College. The student will also receive the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Engineering from UAH or UAB in one of the following areas: civil engineering, computer 
engineering, electrical engineering, industrial and systems engineering, materials engineering, or 
mechanical engineering. 

Major Requirements: 

CH 141-142 General Chemistry 8 hours 

CM 210 Computer Science with C++ 3 hours 

EC 281 Macroeconomics 3 hours 

EG 1 1 1 Introduction to Engineering 2 hours 

EG 112 Engineering Graphics 3 hours 

EG 211 Statics 3 hours 

MA 321 Statistics 3 hours 

MA 171-172-271 Calculus (may need MA121-122 first) 12 hours 

MA 308 Linear Algebra 3 hours 

MA 311 Differential Equations 3 hours 

PH 121-122 General Physics (calculus based) 8 hours 

Total 51 hours 

General Education Requirement variations: 

Six hours of literature in sequence and three hours of history, or 

Six hours of history in sequence and three hours in literature (UAH only) 

Omit one RE elective course 

Omit AS 1 00 (and for all other majors in the department) 



Bachelor of Science in Computer Science 

Major Requirements: 

CM 210 Computer Science I with C++ 3 hours 

CM 220 Computer Science II Data Structures with C++ 3 hours 

CM 340 Computer Logic Design 3 hours 

145 



CM 350 Introductory Computer Architecture 3 hours 

CM 352 Operating Systems 3 hours 

CM 367 Programming Languages 3 hours 

CM 401 Discrete Structures 3 hours 

CM 402 Design and Analysis of Algorithms 3 hours 

CM 490 Research and Independent Study 3 hours 

Select three courses (6 hours upper division) from: 

CM 353 Operating Systems II, CM 381 Computer Networks, 

CM 480 Selected Topics, and CM 491 Research and Ind. Study 9 hours 

MA 171-172-271 Calculus (may need MA 121-122 first) 12 hours 

MA 308 Linear Algebra 3 hours 

MA 312 Numerical Analysis 3 hours 

MA 321 Probability and Statistics 3 hours 

Total 57 hours 



Bachelor of Arts in Mathematics 

Major Requirements: 

MA 171-172-271 Calculus ( may need MA 121-122 first) 12 hours 

MA 308 Linear Algebra 3 hours 

MA 31 1 Differential Equations 3 hours 

MA 321 Probability and Statistics 3 hours 

MA 401 Advanced Calculus 3 hours 

MA 41 1 Introduction to Modern Algebra 3 hours 

MA Electives (upper division) 6 hours 

CM 210 Computer Science I with C+-i- 3 hours 

CM 220 Computer Science II Data Structures with C-i-i- 3 hours 

Total 39 hours 

Minor Required 18-21 hours 

Bachelor of Arts in Mathematics and Computer Science 

Major Requirements: 

MA 171-172-271 Calculus (may need MA 121-122 first) 12 hours 

MA 308 Linear Algebra 3 hours 

MA 312 Numerical Analysis 3 hours 

MA 31 1 Differential Equations or MA 321 Probability and Statistics 3 hours 

CM 210 Computer Science I with C+-i- 3 hours 

CM 220 Computer Science II Data Structures with C-i-+ 3 hours 

CM 340 Computer Logic Design 3 hours 

CM 367 Programming Languages 3 hours 

CM electives (upper division) 6 hours 

Total 39 hours 

Minor Required 18-21 hours 



146 



Bachelor of Science in l\/lathematics Education 

This program qualifies a person to teacli secondary scliool mathematics. After graduation, 
students may apply for the Alabama Class B Certificate: Mathematics, grades 7-12; and the SDA 
Basic Teaching Certificate: Mathematics, grades 7-12. 

Refer to the Department of Education section in this bulletin for the program outline. Program 
advisor: J. Blake. 

Minor in Computer Science 

CM 210 Computer Science I with C-i-h 3 hours 

CM 220 Computer Science II Data Structure with C++ 3 hours 

CM 340 Computer Logic Design 3 hours 

CM 367 Programming Languages 3 hours 

CM electives (upper division) 6 hours 

Total 18 hours 



Minor In Mathematics 

MA 171-172-271 Calculus (may need MA 121-122 first) 12 hours 

MA 308 Linear Algebra 3 hours 

MA311 Differential Equations 3 hours 

MA elective (upper division) 3 hours 

Total 21 hours 

Minor in Physics 

PH 103-104 General Physics 8 hours 

PH 301 Theoretical Mechanics 3 hours 

PH 305 Applied Mathematics 3 hours 

PH 311 Electricity and Magnetism 3 hours 

EG 211 Statics 3 hours 

Total 20 hours 



Description of Courses 
Computer Science 



CM 210 Computer Science I with C++ 3 hours 

An introduction to computers and structured programming using the C-i-+ programming 
language. Topics will include problem-solving methods and algorithms, data types, loops, 
arrays, functions, structures, character strings, pointers, operations on bits, and files. Program 
design and program styles will be stressed. 

CM 220 Computer Science II Data Structures with C++ 3 hours 

A continuation of the study of data representation and algorithm design using C++. Principles 
of good programming style and step wise refinement will be stressed. Topics will indicate string 
processing, searching and sorting, recursion, and dynamic data structures. Prerequisite: CM 
210. 



147 



CM 340 Computer Logic Design 3 hours 

Introduction to formal methods in design of computer logic circuits and systems, contemporary 
design practices, and devices used in the synthesis of digital logic systems. Topics will include 
combinational and sequential systems, gates, memory elements, registers, bus structure, 
timing and control, arithmetic and logical unit, I/O units. Prerequisite: CM 220. 

CIV! 350 Introductory Computer Architecture 3 hours 

Organization and structuring of major hardware components of digital computers. Information 
transfers and transformations which occur inside a computer. Architecture-instruction sets, 
instruction formats, addressing modes, and register usage. Organization computer units-ALU, 
CPU, memory, I/O hardware description methodologies. Taxonomy of computerarchitectures. 
A study of an assembly language will be the case study of the course. Prerequisite: CM 340. 

Cl\1 352 Operating Systems I 3 hours 

Introduction to concepts and algorithms incorporated in operating systems. Examines interre- 
lationships between operating systems and computer hardware. Compares batch, real-time, 
and time-sharing operating systems. Process management techniques, interrupt, handlers, 
CPU scheduling algorithm, interlocks, resource allocation, deadlocks, paging, and memory 
systems are studied. Prerequisite: CM 350. 

CM 353 Operating Systems II 3 hours 

Continuation of CM 352. Introduces advanced topics in the design of operating systems, device 
management and file management techniques, scheduling algorithms, security, and queuing 
theories. Comparison of existing operating systems for client-server, microcomputer, minis, 
and mainframes. Prerequisite: CM 352. 

CM 367 Programming Languages 3 hours 

Organization of programming languages, especially routine behavior of programs; formal study 
of programming language specification and analysis; study, comparison, and evaluation of 
commercially available programming. BNF and syntax diagrams, grammars, program constitu- 
ents, scoping rules, precedence, binding, parameter passing, and compile-versus interpreta- 
tion. Prerequisite: CM 210. 

CM 381 Computer Networks 3 hours 

This course will introduce data communication, base-band and broad-band local area net- 
works, logical link control, Internet protocol, broad case protocol, and distributed processing. 
Prerequisite: CM 340. 

CM 401 Discrete Structures 3 hours 

Mathematical basis for students of computer science. Prepositional logic and proof, set theory, 
algebraic structures, groups and semigroups, graph theory, lattices and Boolean algebra, and 
finite fields. Prerequisite: CM 210. 

CM 402 Design and Analysis of Algorithms 3 hours 

Analysis tools-Turing and Markov algorithms, complexity measures, computational tech- 
niques. Bound analysis of algorithms. Algorithms for internal and external searching/sorting. 
Optimality. Prerequisite: CM 352. 

CM 480 Selected Topics in Computer Science 3 hours 

Students will study special topics of interest which are not normally included in their major 
courses. Prerequisite: approval of instructor. 



148 



CM 490-491 Research and Independent Study (W) each 1-3 hours 

Formulation and solution of a selected problem in computer science. In this course students 
are required to demonstrate their ability to write, using standard English. Prerequisite: upper 
division status. 



Engineering 

EG 111 Introduction to Engineering 2 hours 

Elementary engineering design, drafting, graphics, descriptive geometry, and engineering 
problems. Familiarization with shop processes, fasteners, and dimensioning. Application of 
drawing principles to problems of descriptive geometry. Emphasis is placed on student 
participation in creative design processes. 

EG 1 1 2 Engineering Graphics 3 hours 

Elementary graphics design, drafting, graphics, descriptive geometry, and engineering prob- 
lems. Familiarization with shop processes, fasteners, and dimensioning. Application of 
drawing principles to problems of descriptive geometry. Emphasis is placed on student 
participation in creative design processes. 

EG 211 Statics 3 hours 

Elements of statics in two and three dimensions, centroids, analysis of structures and 
machines, and friction. Prerequisites: MA 271 and PH 122. 



Mathematics 

MA 095 Introduction to College Mathematics 2 hours 

This course is required of all freshmen whose mathematics ACT score is below 16 or 
mathematics SAT score is below 440, and it must be taken before any other mathematics 
courses, if needed. 

MA 100 Introduction to Elementary Mathematics 3 hours 

A study of the language and structure of mathematics, including numeration, integers, rational 
and real numbers, concepts related to consumer mathematics, plane and spherical geometry, 
elementary probability theory, and introduction to the use of computers and simple statistics. 
This course is open to elementary education majors only and cannot be used to fulfill the general 
education requirements in mathematics. 

MA 101 Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics 3 hours 

Topics include number systems and their bases, sets, relations and their properties, further 
extensions of the number systems, polynomials, relations, functions, and their graphs, ratio, 
proportions, and variation. Other topics include basic trigonometry, logarithms, and some 
topics in statistics. Does not count toward a mathematics major or minor. 

MA 108 Introductory College Algebra 3 hours 

A beginning course in algebra solving linear equations, polynomials, factoring, systems of 
equations, graphs, and quadratic equations. Does not count toward a mathematics major or 
minor. 



149 



MA121-122Precaiculusl, II 3-3 hours 

College algebra and trigonometry, including such topics as rational expressions, rational 
exponents, equations and inequalities, relations and functions, exponential and logarithmic 
functions, circular functions and trigonometric functions. Prerequisite: one year of high school 
algebra. 

MA 171 Calculus I 4 hours 

Limits, continuity, derivatives, differentials, chain rule, implicit differentiation, applications of the 
derivative, conies, and antidifferentiation. Prerequisite: MA122 or one year of high school 
precalculus. 

MA 1 72 Calculus II 4 hours 

Definite integrals, fundamental theorem of calculus, exponential and logarithmic functions, 
inverse trigonometric functions, hyperbolic functions, techniques of integration, I'Hospital's 
rule, improper integrals, applications of the integral, sequences and series. Prerequisite: MA 
171. 

MA 211 Survey of Calculus 3 hours 

An introductory study of differential and integral calculus, the theory of vector spaces, and linear 
algebras as applied to chemistry. Does not apply toward a mathematics major or minor. 
Prerequisite: MA 122 or equivalent. 

MA 251 Geometry 3 hours 

An informal summary of elementary Euclidean geometry, a formal modern development of the 
basic concepts of elementary geometry, noneuclidean geometry, and a selection of topics in 
advanced Euclidean geometry. Prerequisite: MA 11 1 . 

MA 271 Calculus III 4 hours 

Polar coordinates, vectors and the geometry of space, partial differentiation, directional 
derivative, tangent plane, extreme values and Lagrange multipliers, multiple integrals, vector 
fields, divergence and curl, line and surface integrals. Prerequisite MA 172. 

MA 305 Applied Mathematics 3 hours 

This course is designed to expose the mathematics major to the working environment of 
industry and to give him/her an opportunity to apply his/her knowledge of mathematics to solve 
problems in the physical, biological, and social sciences. Prerequisite: MA 172. Offered 
alternate years. 

MA 308 Linear Algebra 3 hours 

Systems of linear equations, matrices, matrix operations, determinants, vectors and vector 
spaces, bases, inner product, linear transformations, change of basis, eigenvalues and 
eigenvectors, diagonalization, and applications. Prerequisite: MA 1 72 or consent of instructor. 

MA 311 Differential Equations 3 hours 

First-order differential equations, linear differential equations with variable and constant 
coefficients, systems of linear differential equations, Laplace transform methods, series 
solutions, boundary value problems, and applications. Prerequisite: MA 172 or consent of 
instructor. 



150 



MA 31 2 Numerical Analysis 3 hours 

Numerical methods as they apply to computers. Topics include roots of equations, linear and 
non-linear simultaneous equations, polynomials, numerical integration, ordinary differential 
equations, interpolation and curve-fitting. Prerequisite: MA 172. 

MA 321 Probability and Statistics 3 hours 

Descriptive statistics, elementary probability, sampling distributions, inference, testing hypoth- 
eses and estimation, regression and correlation, and application. Prerequisite: MA 172. 

MA 401 -402 Advanced Calculus 3-3 hours 

Limits, continuity, differentiation and integration of functions of several variables. Convergence 
and uniform convergence of infinite series and improper integrals. Differentials and Jacobians, 
transformations, line and surface integrals, and vector analysis. Prerequisite: MA 31 1 . 

MA 411 Introduction to Modern Algebra (W) 3 hours 

Algebra of sets, equivalence relations, mappings, order relations; discussion of natural, 
rational, real, and complex number systems; study of the abstract systems: groups, fields, 
rings, and integral domain. In this course students are required to demonstrate their ability to 
write, using standard English. Prerequisite: MA 172. 

MA 419 Introduction to Real Analysis (W) 3 hours 

Elementary set theory, the real number system, sequences, limits of functions, continuity, 
differentiation, the Riemann-Stieltes integral, and infinite series. In this course students are 
required to demonstrate their ability to write, using standard English. Prerequisite: MA 172. 

MA 421 Number Theory (W) 3 hours 

A study of the properties of numbers, divisibility, congruencies and residue classes; quadratic 
reciprocity, Diophantine equations, and algebraic numbers. In this course students are 
required to demonstrate their ability to write, using standard English. Offered alternate years. 
Prerequisite: MA 411 or equivalent. 

MA 422 Introduction to Complex Analysis (W) 3 hours 

Functions of a complex variable: integration, sequences and series, the calculus of residues 
and conformal mapping. In this course students are required to demonstrate their ability to 
write, using standard English, Prerequisite: MA 271 . 

MA 490-491 Research and Independent Study (W) each 1-3 hours 

An independent study by the student under the guidance of the staff of such topics as Green's 
Theorem, Laplace Transform, or Bessel Functions. Prerequisites: senior and permission of 
the department chair. 

Physics 

PH 1 01 ,1 02 The Physical Sciences 3,3 hours 

A survey of astronomy, meteorology, geology, chemistry, and physics for the general student. 
Prerequisite: MA 101. 

PH 1 03-1 04 General Physics 4-4 hours 

An introductory treatment of mechanics, vibration, wave motion, sound, heat and thermody- 
namics; electricity and magnetism and optics. Prerequisite: MA 1 22 or equivalent. Laboratory 
included. 



151 



PH 121-122 General Physics With Calculus 4-4 hours 

This course is designed for science and engineering students. Topics covered in Physics 121 
include vectors, Newtonian mechanics, heat and thermodynamics. Physics 122 deals with 
light, electricity, magnetism, and a brief introduction to modern physics. Laboratory included. 
Prerequisite: MA 171. 

PH 301 Theoretical Mechanics 3 hours 

An intermediate course covering the basic principles of vector mechanics and the statics and 
dynamics of particles and rigid bodies. Offered when required. Prerequisites: one year of 
college physics and one year of calculus. 

PH 305 Applied Mathematics 3 hours 

This course is designed to expose the mathematics major to the type of things a mathematician 
employed in industry does, and to give him/her an opportunity to apply his/her knowledge of 
mathematics to solve problems in the physical, biological, and social sciences. Prerequisite: 
one year of calculus. 

PH 311 Electricity and Magnetism 3 hours 

In this course the theory of electric and magnetic phenomena is studied. The following are some 
of the topics that will be included: electrostatic and magnetic fields, introduction and use of 
vector analysis, circuit elements, electromagnetic effects of currents, radiation and Maxwell's 
equation. Offered when required. Prerequisites: one year of college physics and one year of 
calculus. 



152 



Department of Music 



Professor: Osterman 

Associate Professors: Chambers, Lacy (Chair), Mallory 

Assistant Professors: Clay, Contreras, Hutson 

Instructors: Bucknor, Ellis 



Majors: Music (B.A.) 

Music Business (B.S.) 

Music Education (B.S.) 

Theory and Composition (B.M.) 

Vocal Performance and Pedagogy (B.M.) 

Minor: Music 



Purpose 

The Music Department supports the college's mission of providing students with the broadest 
possible access to quality music instruction, opportunities, and services. The department shares 
the college's philosophy that education should form the foundation for continuous Intellectual 
musical development, social responsibility, and academic excellence in a Christian environment for 
the serious study of the music arts. The department prepares individuals for graduate school and 
employment by offering undergraduate music curricula leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Arts 
in Music, Bachelor of Science in Music Teacher Education, and Bachelor of Science In Music 
Business, Bachelorof Music in Theory and Composition, and Bachelorof Music In Vocal Pedagogy 
and Performance. 

Students who are committed to developing their talent to its highest for service to God and to 
humankind are encouraged to apply. 



Application for Admission 

To be admitted as a major in the Department of Music, students must submit an application, 
three letters of recommendation, and audition for the music faculty either by audio/videotape or in 
person. If accepted, students must also take the Theory Placement Examination and audition In the 
performing medium for the music faculty. 

Deficiencies In musical background may require that the student take MU 1 1 1 Basic Musician- 
ship and/or MU 1 00 Individual Instruction and/or MU 1 61 -1 64 Piano Proficiency, which may prolong 
the time for fulfilling the degree requirements. 

Ensembles 

Majors and minors must participate in a departmental ensemble each consecutive semester 
(except when student teaching) until the degree requirements are fulfilled. Students may enroll In 
more than one ensemble. 



153 



Ensemble Requirements 

Bachelor of Arts With Instrumental concentration 

Eight sennester hours of orchestral/instrumental ensemble. 

Bachelor of Arts With Piano concentration 

Eight sennesters of ensemble (four semesters of large ensemble choral and/or instrumental and 
four semesters in chamber and/or piano ensemble). Once enrolled in an ensemble, the student 
must complete an entire academic year. May alter yearly at the advisors' discretion. 

Bachelor of Arts in Voice 

Eight semesters of choral ensemble: College Choir. Aeolians and/or Chamber Singers. 

Bachelor of Science in Music Business 

Seven semesters of choral and/or instrumental ensemble 

Voice concentration: It is encouraged that choral ensemble be elected 

Piano/Instrumental concentration: It is encouraged that a large ensemble instrumental/choral 

be elected. 

Bachelor of Science in Music Education (Instrumental) 

Seven semesters of instrumental ensemble (five large and two small ensembles) 

Bachelor of Science in Music Education (Vocal/Choral) 

Seven semester of choral ensemble (five large and two small ensembles) 

Bachelor of Music in Composition 

Eight semesters of ensemble (four semesters of large ensemble choral and/or instrumental 
and four semesters in chamber ensemble). Once enrolled in an ensemble, the student must 
complete an entire academic year. May alter yearly at the advisor's discretion. 

Bachelor of Music in Vocal Performance and Pedagogy 

Eight semesters of choral ensemble: College Choir, Aeolians, and/or Chamber Singers. 

**Note: Attendance at all departmental recitals and concerts is required of all majors and minors. 
All solo recitals are preceded by a pre-recital six weeks prior to the recital date. 

Exit Examinations 

All senior music majors are required to take the standardized music examination prior to 
graduation. In addition, demonstrated performing competencies are required via a senior solo 
recital for all music majors. (A prerecital qualifying examination must be passed six weeks prior 
to the recital date.) 



Career Opportunities 

Career opportunities include: architectural acoustics consultant, arts management, biogra- 
pher, church musician, composer, conductor, historian, lyricist, music attorney, music industry 
(including radio, television, and publishing), music librarian, music therapist, performance, teach- 
ing, and more. 



154 



Bachelor of Arts in Music 

This degree offers a broad-based study of music within a liberal arts curriculum. Students 
nterested in general music as a double major are encouraged to pursue this degree. In addition 
the core requirements, students can elect one of five areas of concentration: general music, 
)iano, voice, instrument, and composition. 

/lajor Requirements: 

MU 165, 166, 265, 266, 365, 366, 465, 466 Individual Instruction and 

Laboratory 8 hours 

MU 21 1-212 Theory I and Laboratory 6 hours 

MU 220 Music Repertoire 2 hours 

MU 31 1-31 2 Theory II and Laboratory 6 hours 

MU 315 Form and Analysis 3 hours 

MU 320, 321, 322 Music History I, II, III 9 hours 

MU 328 Church Music and Worship 3 hours 

MU 361 Conducting 3 hours 

MU Ensemble 8 hours 

MU 499 Recital 2 hours 

Concentration in General Music, Composition, Piano, 

Instrument or Voice* 8-1 1 hours 

Total 58-61 hours 



General Music concentration: 

Eight hours by advisement (Individual Instruction) 

Piano concentration: 

Eight additional hours of piano and the course MU 31 6 Orchestration, three hours, are required. 

Composition concentration: 

Eight additional hours of composition and the course MU 31 6 Orchestration, three hours, are 
required. 

Voice concentration: 

Eight additional hours of voice are required. 

Instrument concentration: 

Eight additional hours of primary instrument and the course MU 31 6 Orchestration, three hours, 
are required. 



general Education Requirement Variation: 

Omit MU 200 Music Appreciation 

Minor is not required 



155 



Bachelor of Science in Music Business 

This program is designed to prepare the student upon graduation to manage orchestras, opera 
companies, arts organizations, and other related possibilities. 

Major Requirements: 

MU 165,166, 265, 266, 365, 366, 465, 466 Individual Instruction 

and Laboratory 8 hours 

MU 21 1-212 Theory I and Laboratory 6 hours 

MU 220 Music Repertoire 2 hours 

MU 31 1-312 Theory II and Laboratory 6 hours 

MU 320, 321, 322 Music History I, II, III 9 hours 

MU 328 Church Music and Worship 3 hours 

MU 360 Conducting 3 hours 

MU 470 Music Business Internship 2 hours 

MU Ensemble 7 hours 

MU 499 Recital hours 

AC 210-211 Principles of Accounting 6 hours 

BA 105 Introduction to Business 3 hours 

BA 310 Principles of Management 3 hours 

MK 301 Principles of Marketing 3 hours 

BA 460 Business Ethics 3 hours 

BA 475 Business Law 3 hours 

EC 281 Macroeconomics 3 hours 

EC 282 Microeconomics 3 hours 

Total 73 hours 

General Education Requirement Variation: 

Omit MU 200 Music Appreciation. 



Bachelor of Science in Music Education 

This program qualifies a person to teach either vocal/choral or instrumental music. After 
graduation, students may apply for the Alabama Class B Certificate: Vocal/Choral or instrumental 
music, grades preschool-1 2; and the SDA Basic Teaching Certificate: Music, grades preschool-1 2. 

Refer to the Department of Education section in this bulletin for program outline. Program 
advisor: L. Lacy. 



Bachelor of Music in Theory and Composition 

A professional degree designed to prepare undergraduate theory and composition music 
majors to meet the entrance requirements for graduate schools, schools of music, conservatories, 
and professional pursuits. 

Major Requirements: 

MU 165 - 466 Individual Instruction and Laboratory (Secondary Instrument) 4 hours 

MU 211, 212Theory I and Laboratory 6 hours 

MU 220 Music Repertoire 2 hours 

MU 240, 241 , 242 Italian, French, German Diction or Languages 9 hours 



156 



MU 31 1, 312 Theory II and Laboratory 6 hours 

ML! 314 18th Century Counterpoint 3 hours 

MU 315 Form and Analysis 3 hours 

MU 316 Orchestration 3 hours 

MU 320, 321, 322 Music History I, II, III 9 hours 

MU 326-327 Vocal Literature or EN Literature Elective 3 or 4 hours 

MU 328 Church Music and Worship 3 hours 

MU 360 Conducting 3 hours 

MU 165-466 Individual Instruction 

(Primary Instrument Composition) 8 hours 

MU 380 Anatomy for Singers or biology course 3 hours 

MU 41 2 20th Century Analytical Techniques 3 hours 

MU 499 Recital hours 

MU Elective 3 hours 

MU Ensemble 8 hours 

Total 79-80 hours 



General Education Requirement Variations: 

Omit MU 200 Music Appreciation. 
MU 240-242 Diction substitutes for the foreign language. 
MU 320-322 Music History substitutes for the history elective. 
MU 326-327 Vocal Literature substitutes for the literature course 



Bachelor of Music In Vocal Performance and Pedagogy 

This is a professional degree and is designed to better prepare undergraduate vocal music 
majors to meet the entrance requirements for graduate schools, schools of music, and conserva- 
tories, or to teach studio voice. 

Major Requirements: 

MU 1 65, 1 66, 265, 266, 365, 366, 465, 466 Individual Instruction 

and Laboratory 16 hours 

MU 21 1-212 Theory land Laboratory 6 hours 

MU 220 Music Repertoire 2 hours 

MU 240, 241 , 242 Italian/French/German Diction 9 hours 

MU 31 1 , 312 Theory II and Laboratory 6 hours 

MU 315 Form and Analysis 3 hours 

MU 316 Orchestration 3 hours 

MU 320, 321 , 322 Music History and Literature 1,11, III 9 hours 

MU 326 Vocal Literature I 2 hours 

MU 327 Vocal Literature II 2 hours 

MU 328 Church Music and Worship 3 hours 

MU 351 Vocal Pedagogy and Practicum 3 hours 

MU 360 Conducting 3 hours 

MU 380 Anatomy for Singers 3 hours 

MU 499 Recital 2 hours 

MU Ensemble 8 hours 

Total 80 hours 



157 



General Education Requirement Variations: 

Omit ML) 200 Music Appreciation. 

MU 240-242 Diction substitutes for the foreign language. 

MU 320-322 Music History substitutes for the history elective. 

MU 326-327 Vocal Literature substitutes for the literature course. 

MU 380 Anatomy for Singers substitutes for the biology course. 



Minor in IVIusic 

MU 165, 166, 265, 266, 365, 366, 465, 466 Individual Instruction and 

Laboratory (four hours must be upper division) 8 hours 

MU 211-212Theory I and Laboratory 6 hours 

MU 321 Music History II 3 hours 

MU 360 Conducting 3 hours 

MU Ensemble 2 hours 

MU 499 Recital hours 

Total 22 hours 

NOTE: Music fees, in addition to tuition, are assessed for certain courses (see depart- 
ment course fees). 



Description of Courses 

MU 100 Individual Instruction 1-2 hours 

Not available for credit toward degree requirements. Students are expected to practice five 
hours per one credit hour. Repeatable credit. Limited enrollment. 

MU 101 Class Piano 1 hour 

Introduction to the fundamentals of piano playing. Especially designed for the beginner. No 
available for credit toward degree requirements. Repeatable credit. 

MU 102 Class Voice 1 hour 

Introduction to the fundamentals of singing. Designed especially forthe beginner. Not available 
for credit toward degree requirements. Repeatable credit. 

MU 103 Class Instrument 1 hour 

Introduction to the fundamentals of playing an instrument. Especially designed forthe beginner 
Not available for credit toward degree requirements. Repeatable credit. 

MU 104 Class Organ 1 hour 

An introduction to the fundamentals of organ playing. This course is especially designed forthe 
beginner. Not available for credit toward degree requirements. Repeatable credit. Offeree 
alternate years. 

MU 111 Basic Musicianship 2 hours 

This course is a study of the rudiments of music. It is designed for the general college studen 
or the music major and minor whose pre-college music skills are deficient. Not available foi 
credit toward degree requirements. Repeatable credit. Music majors must take this concur- 
rently with MU 101 or MU 161-164. 



158 



m 



MU 1 61 -1 64 Piano Proficiency l-IV 1,1,1,1 hour 

This class is especially designed to prepare music majors for the piano proficiency examination 
given at the end of each academic year. The piano proficiency exam must be successfully 
completed by the end of the sophomore year. Audition/permission of the instructor. 

IVIU 1 65-1 66 Individual Instruction and Laboratory 1 -2 hours 

This course is designed for majors and minors in the study of primary and secondary areas of 
concentration. Students are expected to practice five hours per one hour credit. The laboratory 
consists of a weekly forum that provides an opportunityfor performing in a low-stress situation 
in preparation for juries and recitals. Students must enroll every semester, except during 
internships, until the senior recital is passed. Limited enrollments. 

MU 200 Music Appreciation 3 hours 

An introduction to the music of the Western world from the Middle Ages to the present time. 
Consideration is given to the various political, social, and religious factors that have caused 
changes in musical style from one art period to another. Representative compositions from 
each art period will be studied. Out-of-class listening and concert and recital attendance are 
also a part of the class activities. 

MU 201 College Choir 1 hour 

A large ensemble ranging from 80 to more than 1 00 voices. Membership in this ensemble is 
by audition and/or consent of the director. This ensemble will prepare students for the smaller 
ensemble, the Aeolians, MU 202. Choral literature from the classical, romantic, and modern art 
periods will be performed. In addition, larger choral works will be sung, and when possible, 
these works will be performed with orchestra. Repeatable credit. 

MU 202 Aeolians 1 hour 

The official ensemble of Oakwood College is a mid-size choir (40-55 members) of selected 
voices primarily made up of music majors and minors. Membership in this ensemble is by 
audition and/or consent of the director. This ensemble performs for civic, religious, academic 
and cultural settings. Repertoire spanning from early baroque to contemporary gospel music 
is performed. Members joining this ensemble must demonstrate the ability to sing in various 
musical genres with ease. The Aeolians will join with the College Choirfor large civic, academic, 
and or religious events as needed. Repeatable for credit. 

MU 203 Chamber Singers 1 hour 

A small, highly select ensemble ranging from 8-1 6 voices. Membership in this ensemble is by 
audition and/or consent of the director. Repertoire for the Chamber Singers spans from the 
early Renaissance to early Classical period. Appropriate contemporary music from musicals 
and operas may be performed. The Chamber Singers will join the College Choir for large civic, 
academic, and or religious events as needed. Repeatable for credit. 

MU 204 Wind Ensemble 1 hour 

A large ensemble that rehearses and performs standard band repertory. Membership by 
audition. Repeatable credit. 

MU 205 Chamber Ensemble 1 hour 

A variety of small ensembles that rehearse and perform literature appropriate for the chamber 
ensemble. Limited membership by audition. Repeatable credit. 



159 



MU 206 Handbells 1 hour 

The rehearsal and performance of standard handbell literature. Limited membership by 
audition. Repeatable credit. 

MU 207 Orchestra 1 hour 

A large ensemble that rehearses and performs standard orchestral literature. Membership by 
audition. Repeatable credit. 

MU 21 1 , 21 2 Theory I and Laboratory 3,3 hours 

A study of the structural and harmonic materials of diatonic music, with examples drawn from 
standard classical literature. Written, aural, and keyboard work are an integral part of this 
course. Prerequisites: MU 111 and MU 101. 

MU 220 Music Repertoire 2 hours 

Guided listening to standard works of the Western classical repertoire. The list of works is 
determined by the entire music faculty and is revised periodically. Prerequisite: MU 21 1 or 
permission of instructor. 

MU 230 Principles of Teaching Music Education 2 hours 

A basic survey course designed to give the prospective teacher an understanding of the 
principles of music teaching and learning. The procedures employed will be the organization, 
motivation, and management of preschool-12 instrumental, vocal/choral, and general music. 
Opportunities are provided by observing, assisting, conducting, playing, singing, and participat- 
ing in laboratory activities. 

MU 231 Survey of Woodwind Instruments 1 hour 

This course is designed to develop the technical knowledge necessary for teaching tone 
production and performance skills on woodwind instruments. Offered alternate years, pending 
enrollment. 

MU 232 Survey of String Instruments 1 hour 

This course is designed to develop the technical knowledge necessary for teaching tone 
production and performance skills on string instruments. Offered alternate years, pending 
enrollment. 

MU 233 Survey of Percussion Instruments 1 hour 

This course is designed to develop the technical knowledge necessary for teaching tone 
production and performance skills on percussion instruments. Offered alternate years. Prereq- 
uisite: MU 212. 

MU 234 Survey of Brass Instruments 1 hour 

This course is designed to develop the technical knowledge necessary for teaching tone 
production and performance skills on brass instruments. Offered alternate years, pending 
enrollment. 

MU 240 Italian Diction 3 hours 

Principles of pronunciation and enunciation of Italian and the use of the international phonetic 
alphabet (IPA). Emphasis is placed upon reading, listening, and research of materials in Italian 
repertoire. Demonstrative performances are required. Offered alternate years, pending enroll- 
ment. 



160 



MU 241 French Diction 3 hours 

Principles of pronunciation and enunciation of French and the use of the international phonetic 
alphabet (IPA). Emphasis is placed upon reading, listening, and research of materials of French 
repertoire. Demonstrated performances are required. Offered alternate years, pending 
enrollment. 

MU 242 German Diction 3 hours 

Principles of pronunciation and enunciation of German and the use of the international phonetic 
alphabet (IPA). Emphasis is placed upon reading, listening, and research of materials on 
German culture. Demonstrated performances are required. Offered alternate years, pending 
enrollment. 

IVIU 265, 266 Individual Instruction and Laboratory 1-2 hours 

For course description, see MU 165, 166. Prerequisites: MU 165, 166. Limited enrollment. 

MU 300 Individual Instruction 1-2 hours 

Not available for credit to majors and minors. Limited enrollment. Students are expected to 
practice five hours per one credit hour. Repeatable credit. Junior level. Prerequisite: MU 1 00. 

MU 31 1 , 31 2 Theory II and Laboratory 3,3 hours 

The study of structural and harmonic materials of chromatic music, with examples drawn from 
standard classical literature. Written, aural, and keyboard work are integral parst of this course. 
Prerequisite: MU212. 

MU 314 18th Century Counterpoint 3 hours 

A study of 18th century two-, three-, and four-voice counterpoint. Offered alternate years, 
pending enrollment. Prerequisite: MU212. 

MU 315 Form and Analysis 3 hours 

A detailed analysis of structure, harmonic, and contrapuntal forms in tonal music. Offered 
alternate years. Prerequisite: MU212. 

MU 316 Orchestration 3 hours 

The study of range, techniques, timbre, and transportation of orchestral and band instruments. 
Written exercises are an integral part of the course. Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: MU 
312. 

MU 320 Music History and Literature I Chant to Chorale, 600-1600 (W) 3 hours 

An in-depth study of the development of Western music from the monophonic chants of the 
early church and continuing to the growth of polyphony, to the appearance of secular forms and 
the music of the Reformation. Compositions will be studied, analyzed, and listened to. Attention 
will be drawn to the political, religious, philosophical, and social events that shape the arts of 
any given time. Out-of-class listening and concert and recital attendance are also part of the 
class activities. Offered fall semesters. Prerequisites: junior standing and MU 212, MU 220, 
EN 1 1 2, or permission of the instructor. 

MU 321 Music History and Literature II Monteverdi to Mozart (W) 3 hours 

The development of major musical styles in the baroque and classical periods. Compositions 
will be studied, analyzed, and listened to. Attention will be drawn to the political, religious, 
philosophical, and social events that shape the arts of any given time. Out-of-class listening and 
concert and recital attendance are also part of the class activities. Offered spring semesters. 
Prerequisites: junior standing and MU 21 2, EN 1 1 2, or permission of the instructor. 

161 



MU 322 Music History and Literature III Beethoven to the Present (W) 3 hours 

A study of the development of musical styles in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. 
Consideration will also be paid to the influence of African-American composers and their music. 
Compositions will be studied, analyzed, and listened to. Attention will be drawn to the political, 
religious, philosophical, and social events that shape the arts of any given time. Out-of-class 
listening and concert and recital attendance are also part of the class activities. Prerequisites: 
junior standing and MU 212, MU 220, EN 1 12 or permission of the instructor. 

MU 323 History of African-American Music (W) 3 hours 

A study of the history of African-American music from 1 61 9 through the present day. Focuses 
upon the socio-historical context in which popular music, folk music, classical music, and 
religious music evolved. Topics include the spiritual, blues, gospel, jazz, rhythm and blues, and 
contemporary music, as well as women in music. Open to non-music majors. No technical 
knowledge required. Offered spring semester. Prerequisites: HI 103-104 or HI 211-212. 

MU 324, 325 Piano Literature I, II 3, 3 hours 

A comprehensive study of teaching methods and piano literature from all art periods. Stylistic 
tendencies as well as performance practices will be studied. Offered alternate years, pending 
enrollment. Prerequisite: MU 265 

MU 326 Vocal Literature I (W) 2 hours 

A survey of song literature from 1 600 to the present day. Study of representative composers, 
poets, and works, with extensive listening and performance required. Emphasis will be placed 
on German Lieder, French Melodie, Italian Canzone, and the British and American art song. 
An analysis of performance practices of the various musical periods, styles, and representative 
composers of each genre. Offered alternating odd years, pending enrollment. Prerequisite: MU 
266. 

MU 327 Vocal Literature II (W) 2 hours 

A survey of opera and oratorio from its conception to the present day. Study of representative 
composers and their works from the various musical periods. Emphasis will be placed on styles 
and trends of the periods that had an impact on the two art forms. This class will require 
extensive listening and class participation. Offered alternating odd years, pending enrollment. 
Prerequisite: MU 266 and MU 326. 

MU 328 Church Music and Worship 3 hours 

The study ofthe biblical basis forthe theological implications involved in church music practice, 
with emphasis on the development of principles for guidance in the use and selection of 
available literature. Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: MU 220. 

MU 329 Instrumental Literature 3 hours 

A comprehensive study of teaching methods and literature for various instruments from all art 
periods. Stylistic tendencies as well as performance practices will be considered. Offered 
alternate years, pending enrollment. Prerequisite: MU 265. 

MU 330, 331 Methods and Materials of Teaching 2, 3 hours 

A two-part course in methods, materials, and techniques of teaching school music from 
preschool-grade 12. Emphasis is placed on the planning and implementation of learning 
activities in simulated and/or clinical settings. A practicum is required. Offered alternate years, 
pending enrollment. Prerequisite: ED 300. 



162 



MU 332 Literature of School Music 3 hours 

A critical study of scliool music literature pertaining to American multiculturalism. Appropriate 
for P-12 in public and private settings. A practicum is required. Prerequisite: MU 230. 

MU 333 Diction for School Music 1 hour 

The study of the International Phonetic Alphabet as it pertains to romantic and Germanic 
languages to aid in effective communication with students of diverse backgrounds in public and 
private school settings. Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: MU 230. 

MU 350 Anatomy for Singers 3 hours 

A study of the anatomical structure of the human body as il relates to the art of singing. Attention 
will be given to the function and structure of organs, muscles, cartilage, and bones involved in 
the respiratory and phonation process needed for singing. Offered alternate years, pending 
enrollment. Prerequisite: MU 265. 

MU 351 Vocal Pedagogy and Practicum 3 hours 

A comprehensive study of methods, materials, and sequence for teaching voice. Emphasis is 
placed upon proper voice development and methods of vocal production and maintenance. 
Students will have supervised experiences in the teaching of private lessons. Offered alternate 
years. Prerequisite: MU 265. 

MU 360 Conducting 2-3 hours 

The study of basic conducting techniques and patterns and their application in solving musical 
problems of tempo changes, dynamics, fermatas, cuing, and the development of the left hand. 
Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: MU212. 

MU 361 Advanced Conducting 2 hours 

A continuation of applying the basic skills of conducting, with attention given to choral and 
instrumental literature, rehearsal techniques, and phrasing. Offered alternate years, pending 
enrollment. Prerequisite: MU 360. 

MU 365, 366 Individual Instruction and Laboratory 1-2 hours 

For course description, see MU 165, 166. Prerequisites: MU 265, 266. Limited enrollment. 

MU 370 Introduction to Music Technology 3 hours 

A study of music technology in today's world. Topics include acoustics, electronic sound 
generation, recording, operation of audio equipment, and basic principles of composition, and 
arranging, with some hands-on experience at the computer. Offered alternate years, pending 
enrollment. Prerequisite: MU 21 1 or permission of instructor. 

MU 380 Piano Pedagogy and Practicum 3 hours 

A comprehensive study of methods, materials, and physiological and technical problems 
involved in teaching piano. Students will have supervised experiences in the teaching of private 
lessons. Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: MU 265. 

MU 382 Instrument Pedagogy and Practicum 3 hours 

A comprehensive study of methods, materials, and physiological and technical problems 
involved in teaching various instruments. Students will have supervised experiences in the 
teaching of private lessons. Offered alternate years or as needed. Prerequisite: MU 265. 



163 



MU 411 Modern-Day Arranging 3 hours 

A study of the art of arranging for voice and instruments using conventional and twentieth- 
century techniques. Offered alternate years, pending enrollment. Prerequisite: MU 315. 

MU 41 2 1 9th and 20th Century Analytical Technique 3 hours 

This course is a continuation of MU 31 5 Form and Analysis This course will include the study 
and analysis of nineteenth- and twentieth-century scores and compositional techniques. 
Students will analyze different types (orchestral, keyboard, vocal, etc.) and write a paper on 
each piece. Prerequisites: MU 312, 314, 315. 

MU 465, 466 Individual Instruction and Laboratory 1-2 hours 

For course description, see MU 165, 166. Prerequisite: MU 365, 366. Limited enrollment. 

MU 470 Music Business Internship 2-6 hours 

This course is designed to give majors hands-on experience in the various areas of arts 
management and is tailored to meet the students' individual career goals. It includes learning 
the rudiments of bookings, audience development, marketing, promotion and presentation, 
fund-raising, finance, and much more. Repeatable credit, pending enrollment. Prerequisites: 
BA310andBA411. 

MU 490-491 Research and Independent Study each 1-3 hours 

An individual investigation into the art/science of music. A major research project is required. 
Prerequisite: MU321. 

MU 499 Recital 0-2 hours 

Attendance at all departmental recitals and concerts is required of all majors and minors. All 
solo recitals are preceded by a pre-recital six weeks prior to the recital date. Individual 
instruction is required. The Bachelor of Arts degree requires one 30-minute junior recital and 
one 60-minute senior recital. Senior status begins after the completion of the junior recital. The 
Bachelor of Science degree requires one 40-minute recital. The Bachelor of Music degree 
requires one 30-minute recital and one 60-minute recital. The minor in music requires one 30- 
minute recital. All recitals must be given in the same medium and be memorized according to 
traditional protocol. Repeatable credit. Prerequisites: MU 366. Permission from instructor 
required. 




164 



Department of Nursing 



Professor: Allen (Chair) 

Associate Professors: Dormer, Flood 

Assistant Professors: Anderson, Gwebu, Medley, Patel, Simons 

Lab Instructor: Wills 

l\/lajors: Nursing ( B.S.) 



Purpose 

It is the purpose of the Department of Nursing to provide a liberal arts foundation to prepare 
nurses to apply Christian principles in meeting the biopsychosocial and spiritual needs of clients. 
Students are prepared to care for clients across the life cycle in a variety of health-care settings. 

Career Opportunities 

The Department of Nursing offers two baccaluareate degree programs: a generic (four-year 
BS) program that prepares students to take the National Council Licensure Examination for 
Registered Nursing (NCLEX-RN); and a non-generic program two-year (RN-BS) that provides 
registered nurses prepared at the associate degree level an opportunity to obtain a bachelors 
degree in nursing. Both programs prepare students for graduate study in nursing and to practice 
at the professional level in a variety of health care settings, including the community, industry, 
government, hospitals, and clinics. 



Bachelor of Science in Nursing 
Admission requirements for clinical courses: 

1. Admission by the college (admission to the college does not guarantee admission to a 
specific department or program). 

2. High school cumulative GPA of 3.00 or above on a four-point scale, or college cumulative 
GPA of 2.70 or above on a four-point scale. 

3. ACT composite score of 17 or above, or SAT composite of 840 or above. Satisfactory 
completion of developmental courses, identified by low ACT/SAT scores, C (2.00) or 
above. 

4. Demonstrated reading at the 1 2th grade level, as indicated through diagnostic testing by 
the Center for Academic Advancement (CAA) or other testing centers. 

5. Students having two failures (C- or less) in the hard sciences (biology, chemistry) or two 
failures in previous nursing courses are not eligible for admission to the nursing program. 

Progression 

Students must: 

1. Attain skill mastery of 100 percent to successfully complete each nursing performance 
course. 



165 



2. Pass a math proficiency examination at the 90 percent level in specified courses; students 
may repeat the math proficiency exam four times; mastery of the exam must be 
accomplished by the dates specified for each course. 

3. Earn a grade of C (2.00) or better in each nursing course, with a minimum cumulative grade 
point average of 2.50. Should a student receive a grade lower than C, he/she must repeat 
the course. 

4. Earn a grade of C (2.00) or better in each cognate course. Cognate courses include, but 
are not limited to, the following: Chemistry, Anatomy and Physiology I and II, Microbiology, 
college-level mathematics, psychology, sociology, speech, statistics, and English. 

5. Complete all previous level courses (cognate and nursing) before profession to the next 
level. 

6. Repeat successfully all courses in which the minimum grade C (2.00) was not achieved. 
No more than two courses may be repeated, only one of which may be a nursing 
course. Courses may be repeated in the following combination: one nursing and one 
cognate, or two cognate courses. 

7. Fulfill any remedial contracts specified by the department. 

8. Validate nursing knowledge through written examination and clinical performance for any 
courses taken prior to a lapse of two years or more in the program of studies. 

9. Present annual verification of current CPR certification and tuberculosis screening. 

Students who engage in misconduct that would jeopardize their professional performance as 
nurses may be denied admission or removed from the program. The Department of Nursing 
reserves the right to revise, add, or delete courses as needed to maintain the quality of the nursing 
program. 

Students in the generic program must graduate in order to write tine NCLEX-RN. The RN license 
may be denied where there is failure to show good moral character as it pertains to nursing, including 
but not limited to: conviction of a felony, abuse of or addiction to alcohol or drugs, and theft of drugs. 
The decision as to whether the applicant is of good moral character is at the discretion of the 
Alabama Board of Nursing (Alabama Board of Nursing Administrative Code 610-X-8-.01 p. 46). 

Exit Examinations 

Students must demonstrate satisfactory performance on a comprehensive exit examination 
as described in the departmental Student l-landboof<'\n order to graduate from the program. 



Major Requirements: 

NU 110 Introduction to Nursing 3 hours 

NU 1 1 1 Health Promotion and Environmental Health 3 hours 

NU 209 Nutrition for Professional Nursing 3 hours 

NU 210 Assessment and Skills I 3 hours 

NU 211 Assessment and Skills II 3 hours 

NU 212 Pharmacology for Nursing 1 hour 

NU 213 Professional Foundations of Nursing Practice 3 hours 

NU 214 Nursing Performance I 1 hour 

NU 330 Pathophysiology 3 hours 

NU 331 Nursing With Adults 3 hours 

NU 332 Mental Health Nursing 3 hours 

NU 333 Nursing Performance II 4 hours 

NU 334 Nursing Informatics 3 hours 

NU 335 Transcultural Nursing 3 hours 

166 



NU 336 Research in Nursing 3 hours 

NU 337 Nursing With Infants and Children 3 hours 

NU 338 Nursing Performance III 2 hours 

NU 410 Leadership/Management 3 hours 

NU 411 Community Health Nursing 3 hours 

NU 412 Nursing with Women during Childbearing Years 3 hours 

NU 413 Nursing Performance IV 4 hours 

NU 416 Gerontological and Complex Medical-Surgical Nursing 3 hours 

NU 417 Nursing Performance V 4 hours 

NU 420 Nursing Trends 1 hour 

OC 201 Community and Service Learning 1 hour 

Bl 1 1 1-12 Anatomy and Physiology 6 hours 

BI221 Microbiology 4 hours 

CH 101 Introduction to Inorganic Chemistry and Lab 3 hours 

CH 102 Introduction to Organic and Biochemistry and Lab 3 hours 

PY 101 Principles of Psychology 3 hours 

PY 307 Statistical Methods 3 hours 

SO 101 Principles of Sociology 3 hours 

Total 94 hours 

General Education Requirement Variations: 

OmitAS100/AS203 
Omit history elective 
Omit MA 101 if ACT is 21 
Omit PE 21 1 Health Principles 

Total hours required for the degree are 132-133. 



Bachelor of Science in Nursing 
(RN Completion Program) 



Admission Requirements 



1 . Associate of Science degree or diploma from a state-approved school of nursing. 

2. Satisfactory completion of all general education courses as required for the Oakwood 
College associate degree program or equivalents. 

3. Two recommendations — one from current supervisor in a health-care setting or former 
instructor if applicant is a recent student of nursing (form to be provided by the department). 

4. Current nursing license or temporary permit to practice in Alabama, with verification of 
licensure. 

5. Evidence of current CPR certification. 

6. Credit for nursing courses taken at schools other than Oakwood will be considered on an 
individual basis by the Department of Nursing. Validation of previous knowledge will be 
determined by examination and/or demonstration. 

7. If a lapse of time (2 years or greater) occurs in a student's program of study, prior nursing 
credits will not be accepted unless an applicant can validate nursing knowledge through 
written examinations and clinical performance. 



167 



Progression 

1. AgradeofC (2.00) or better in each course is required for the major. 

2. Courses required forthe major may be repeated only once. No more than two courses may 
be repeated, only one of which may be a nursing course. 

3. Graduation requirements include a minimum GPA of 2.25 in the major. 



Major Requirements: 

NU 330 Pathophysiology 3 hours 

NU 340 Professional Nursing , 3 hours 

NU 341 Health Assessment 2 hours 

NU 342 Gerontological Nursing 3 hours 

NU 410 Leadership/Management in Nursing 5 hours 

NU 41 1 Community Health Nursing 5 hours 

NU 414 Transcultural Nursing 3 hours 

NU 415 Advanced Clinical Nursing 5 hours 

NU 422 Research in Nursing 3 hours 

CH 102 Introduction to Organic and Biochemistry 4 hours 

PY 307 Statistical Methods 3 hours 

Total 39liours 

General Education Requirement Variations: 

Omit the history elective 

Omit PE 21 1 Health Principles and MA 1 01 if ACT is 21 

Total hours required for the degree are 1 34-1 36. 



Description of Courses 

NU 1 02 Adult Health I 6 hours 

This course provides students with theory and clinical opportunities to use the nursing process 
to care for individuals and families with simple alterations in basic needs throughout the life 
cycle. Prerequisites: NU 101, NU 104 or FS 131, NU 105. 

NU 106 Non-Drug Therapeutics 3 hours 

This course is intended to teach persons in the use of simple remedies and treatments that can 
be used in the home. The principles underlying the effects of the treatment methods are 
examined, and common symptoms and illnesses that respond to these treatments are covered. 
It is not expected that the information given in this course will take the place of the services of 
physicians or other health-care professionals. 

NU 11 Introduction to Nursing 3 hours 

This course provides an introduction to biblical and Seventh-day Adventist principles of health, 
and to the philosophy and conceptual framework of the Oakwood College Department of 
Nursing. Taught from a critical thinking perspective, this writing intensive course will also 
include nursing history and trends, medical terminology, and an introduction to legal and ethical 
issues in health care. 



NU 111 Health Promotion and Environmental Health 3 hours 

This course focuses on theories, concepts, and the appropriate technology related to health 
and health promotion, with ennphasis on biblical and Seventh-day Adventist principles. It 
concentrates on factors that influence health and strategies that enhance the care of individuals 
and communities through the promotion of a healthy environment. Basic knowledge related to 
environmental health will be incorporated (e.g., assessment and referral, advocacy, environ- 
mental justice, risk communication, legislation, and regulation). 

NU 201 The Childbearing Family 5 hours 

This course emphasizes use of the nursing process to provide care for clients during the 
prepartum, labor, and postpartum periods of the childbearing process. Also emphasizes 
nursing care of children in stages of development from infancy through adolescence. Prereq- 
uisite: Level II status. 

NU 202 The Childrearing Family 5 hours 

This course provides the student with the theory and practice of family-centered child care at 
different points on the wellness-illness continuum. It teaches students how to promote health 
and spirituality, and to care for the child and his/her family in a vahety of clinical settings in acute 
care, long-term care, and community settings. Content includes normal phenomena and 
complications. 

NU 203 Mental Health Nursing 5 hours 

In this course, students adapt the nursing process to individuals with altered basic needs and 
psychiatric problems. It builds on concepts of behavior and interpersonal and communication 
skills learned in prior nursing courses. Prerequisites: NU 201 and 202. 

NU 204 Adult Health II 6 hours 

This course provides students with theory and clinical opportunities to apply medical-surgical 
concepts in the critical care setting where there are multiple alterations in basic needs. 
Principles of general client management are also discussed and implemented in clinical 
situations. Prerequisites: Level II status and all previous nursing courses. 

NU 205 Seminar in Nursing 1 hour 

A seminar designed to assist students in preparing to write the NCLEX-RN. Students must 
perform at a satisfactory level on a comprehensive examination to measure readiness to pass 
NCLEX as a part of course requirements. Prerequisite: successful completion of, or current 
enrollment in, all general education courses and all major course requirements. 

NU 209 Nutrition for Professional Nursing 3 hours 

This course focuses on normal and therapeutic nutrition throughout the life span. The role of 
proper nutrition in enhancing and maintaining health and interventions appropriate to various 
clinical situations will be addressed. 

NU 210 Assessment and Skills I 3 hours 

This course introduces the student to professional nursing skills used in basic health 
assessment and patient care procedures performed in a variety of health care settings across 
the life span. Patient-related developmental, psychosocial, environmental, and health promo- 
tion factors that influence nursing care will be addressed. 



NU 21 1 Assessment and Skills II 3 hours 

This course further develops professional nursing assessment and performance skills intro- 
duced in NU 210 Assessment and Skills I, with an emphasis on appropriate technology for 
health promotion, protection, and restoration across the life span. Interpersonal and commu- 
nication skills are emphasized. 

NU 212 Pharmacology for Nursing 1 hour 

A study of the principles of pharmacology and the roles and responsibilities of the nurse in drug 
administration will be emphasized in this course. A survey of the major drug categories will 
provide a foundation for the specific pharmacological applications in each clinical course. 

NU 213 Professional Foundations of Nursing Practice 3 hours 

The course is an orientation to the role of the professional nurse. Content includes the definition 
and scope of nursing practice, history of the nursing profession, and functions of other health 
care professionals, contemporary issues, and trends in nursing and health care. 

NU 214 Nursing Performance I 1 hour 

This clinical course provides opportunities for the development of professional nursing skills 
with emphasis on health promotion, disease prevention, health restoration, and beginning 
health assessment and nursing procedures in a variety of health care settings. 

NU 330 Pathophysiology 3 hours 

This course is the study of the physiologic changes that occur as a result of disease processes 
and functions of the body. Alterations, the mechanisms involved, and their manifestations as 
signs, symptoms, and physical and laboratory findings are examined in order to provide the 
common bond linking microbiology, chemistry, anatomy, and biochemistry to clinical practice. 

NU 331 Nursing with Adults 3 hours 

This course focuses on professional nursing principles for the promotion, maintenance, and 
restoration of health for young and mid-life adults. Contemporary health issues and concerns 
of these age groups will be studied, with emphasis on developmental stages, health promotion 
practices, impact of illness, spiritual dimensions, and cultural diversity. A multisectoral 
approach will be used to study socioeconomics and the ethical and legal issues that affect adult 
health. 

NU 332 Mental Health Nursing 3 hours 

This course addresses the use of mental health nursing principles to promote, maintain, and 
restore optimum functioning for patients with neuropsychiatric disorders. It builds on concepts 
of behavior and interpersonal and communication skills learned in prior nursing courses. 

NU 333 Nursing Performance II 4 hours 

This clinical course provides opportunities for the implementation of professional nursing care 
to facilitate health promotion, maintenance, and restoration for adult clients in a variety of 
settings, including mental health experiences. 

NU 334 Nursing Informatics 3 hours 

This course will provide a basic introduction to nursing informatics (the combination of nursing 
science, computer science, and information science) that will enable the student to work 
effectively using nursing information systems for patient assessment and evaluation and the 
delivery and management of patient care. 



170 



NU 335 Transcultural Nursing (Generic BSN Program) 3 hours 

This course provides an opportunity fertile student to examine tine way in whicli values, beliefs, 
and cultural practices affect health and illness among individuals, families, groups, and 
communities. 

NU 336 Research in Nursing (Generic BSN Program) 3 hours 

This course is designed to introduce the student to principles and methods of research to be 
utilized in developing a nursing research project. The research process is introduced culminat- 
ing in completion of a research proposal. Basic skills for evaluating research and means of 
utilizing research findings to incorporate them into practice are explored. Emphasis is placed 
on the ethical/legal principles of scientific research. 

NU 337 Nursing With Infants and Children 3 hours 

This course focuses on applying professional nursing principles in the promotion, maintenance, 
and restoration of health for infants, children, adolescents, and their families. Health issues and 
nursing concerns of these age groups will be studied with emphasis on developmental stages, 
family processes, health promotion practices, and social, cultural, and spiritual influences. 

NU 338 Nursing Performance III 2 hours 

This clinical course provides opportunities for the implementation of professional nursing care 
to facilitate health promotion, maintenance, and restoration for individuals across the life span 
and their families in community-based settings. Particular emphasis will be given to the care 
of infants, children, and adolescents and their families. 

NU 340 Professional Nursing 3 hours 

The associate degree and diploma nurse are oriented to the roles of the baccalaureate nurse 
through the exploration of professional issues. Students are introduced to the philosophy and 
conceptual framework of the bachelor of science program. Theoretical models are examined. 
Principles of teaching are emphasized. Prerequisite: completion of ASN or Diploma Program 
in Nursing. 

NU 341 Health Assessment 2 hours 

This course provides a comprehensive and systematic nursing approach to health assessment 
and decision-making while incorporating traditional physical examination skills. Emphasis is 
placed on the nursing process in assessing and evaluating the health and functional status of 
individuals, with consideration to multicultural and developmental variations. Campus labora- 
tory experiences are provided to enhance the students' assessment skills. Prerequisite: senior 
standing if in ASN Program. 

NU 342 Gerontology Nursing 3 hours 

This course emphasizes natural aging processes and special needs of older clients and 
families within the context of their environments. It examines physical, psychosocial, cultural, 
and spiritual adjustments associated with aging, and implications for nursing practice and social 
change. Learning experiences are selected to enhance the students' appreciation for the 
uniqueness of this age group. 

NU 350 International Nursing 3-6 hours 

This elective course provides the student an opportunity to gain theoretical and practical 
knowledge of issues in international nursing practice. The student may elect to participate in 
the didactic portion of the course only, or may engage in an overseas experience during the 
summer. 



171 



NU 410 Leadership/Management 3 hours 

The professional nurse has opportunities to interact with many individuals, including clients and 
their families, peers, and other health care providers. This course is designed to assist the 
professional nursing student in the development of leadership/management skills so that he/ 
she will be able to function as collaborator/facilitator and change agent. These concepts and 
theories will be operationalized through the use of the patterns of knowing, thereby assisting 
the nurse in assuming appropriate leadership/management roles in a variety of settings. 

NU 411 Community Health Nursing 5 hours 

This course analyzes the multifaceted role of the community health nurse and the scope of 
nursing practice in maximizing the health and wellness potential of individuals, families, groups, 
and communities through culturally appropriate nursing strategies that promote health and 
provide health-care supervision, health education, and disease prevention. Basic principles of 
epidemiology and research are presented. The clinical setting promotes the synthesis of 
nursing skills and public health concepts through the application of the nursing process. 

NU 412 Nursing With Women during Childbearing Years 3 hours 

This course focuses on the promotion, maintenance, and restoration of health for women during 
the childbearing years, their newborns, and theirfamilies. It relates physiological, environmen- 
tal, cultural, behavioral, and spiritual factors and issues that influence the reproductive woman 
and childbearing. Issues and trends in women's health are addressed as well as professional 
nursing interventions. 

NU 413 Nursing Performance IV 4 hours 

This clinical course provides opportunities for the implementation of professional nursing care 
to facilitate health promotion, maintenance, and restoration to individuals, groups, and families. 
The student will be expected to synthesize knowledge and use skills from previous and current 
courses in providing care with a beginning level of independence. The care of women and their 
families during childbearing years and the implementation of nursing management skills will be 
emphasized. 

NU 414 Transcultural Nursing (RN-BSN Program) 3 hours 

Provides opportunity for students to look at how values, beliefs, and practices among cultural 
groups affect the individual's health and illness. Prerequisites: admission to BSN clinical 
nursing courses and senior standing. 

NU415 Advanced Clinical Nursing 5 hours 

This course provides the student an opportunity to select an area of nursing interest to expand 
knowledge and skills and further refine management and leadership techniques, as the student 
begins preparation for transition into the field of nursing practice. Students initiate, plan, and 
evaluate individual development toward meeting professional and educational goals. 

NU 416 Gerontological and Complex Medical-Surgical Nursing 3 hours 

This course focuses on patients with complex medical-surgical alterations in health through- 
out the adult life span . The course provides opportunities to manage health care of individuals, 
families, groups, and communities requiring health promotion, protection, and restoration. 
Chronic and acute clinical situations are addressed in the light of life-threatening situations. 



172 



NU 41 7 Nursing Performance V 4 hours 

This clinical course provides opportunities to manage health care of individuals, fannilies, 
groups, and communities requiring health promotion, maintenance, and restoration. The 
student will practice in a variety of settings, such as hospitals, senior citizen assisted living 
facilities, nursing homes, and senior citizen day-care centers. The learner will be expected to 
integrate knowledge from previous and current courses in the comprehensive management 
of complex nursing situations throughout the adult life span. 

NU 420 Nursing Trends 1 hour 

A global perspective is used to examine health care and nursing trends in relation to pnmary 
health care goals and objectives and the health objectives for the nation. Emphasis is placed 
on health advocacy skills to promote health and prevent disease. Contemporary practice 
models, health care economics, professional nursing issues, legal and ethical issues, and an 
analysis of the health care delivery system are among the topics that will be considered. 

NU 422 Research in Nursing (RN-BSN Program) 3 hours 

The research process is explored. Students are introduced to their role as consumers of 
nursing research and taught how to analyze research for application to clinical practice. 

NU 450 Nursing Elective 2-3 hours 

This senior elective course allows the student an opportunity to select a preferred area of 
nursing practice for focused theoretical learning and clinical practice. The student, in 
consultation with the course advisor, plans the elective experience. 




173 



Department of Psychology 



Professors: Matthews 

Associate Professors: Blanch-Payne, Carter (Chair), Cort 

Assistant Professors: Webb 

Majors: Psychology (B.A. and B.S.) 

Minors: Correctional Science 

Psychology 
Sociology 



Purpose 

It is the purpose of the Department of Psychology to provide a liberal arts, undergraduate 
foundation with a basic understanding of the principles, facts, approaches, and methods in 
psychology. The goal of the department is to aid the student in (1) acquiring knowledge and 
developing skills for entry-level professional service, (2) preparing for entry into graduate programs, 
(3) receiving a Christian perspective of psychology, and (4) understanding self and others better 
in an appreciation of the origin, nature, and process of individual differences from the psychological 
viewpoint. 



l-ligh School Preparation 

A strong academic background will be valuable for the potential psychology major, with 
emphasis on biology, computer skills, mathematics, and social sciences. 

Exit Examination 

The Major Field Achievement Test, developed by the Educational Testing Service, or an 
equivalent will be administered during the spring semester to all seniors. A passing score is one 
standard deviation below the mean score of 1 46, or the mean score for the group. The lower of the 
two scores will be accepted. 

Career Opportunities 

Human understanding and service constitute great needs among people today. Psychology 
graduates are entering all kinds of occupations in business, governmental and private human 
service agencies, and teaching. The bachelor's degree in psychology is a flexible and versatile way 
to prepare for a career in human services and diverse lines of work. Psychology graduates are 
upwardly mobile, but their advances are strongly correlated with training beyond the bachelor's 
degree. 



174 



Bachelor of Arts in Psychology 

The B.A. degree in Psychology offers a broad study of behavior and provides the acadennic 
preparation required for graduate training. 

Major Requirements: 

PY 101 Principles of Psychology 3 hours 

PY 201 Psychology of Religion 3 hours 

PY 307 Statistical Methods 3 hours 

PY 371 Biological Psychology 3 hours 

PY 401 History and Systems of Psychology 3 hours 

PY 41 1 Principles of Research 3 hours 

PY460 Experimental Psychology 3 hours 

PY 460L Experimental Psychology Lab 1 hour 

PY 480 Seminar in Psychology 2 hours 

Select from: PY 301 Social Psychology, 

PY 319 Theories of Personality, 

PY 321 Abnormal Behavior, and 

PY325 Developmental Psychology 9 hours 

PY Electives 9 hours 

Total 42 hours 

Minor is recommended 



Bachelor of Science in Psychology 

The B.S. degree with a counseling or industrial/organizational emphasis offers an applied 
approach to the study of behavior. It also provides the student with opportunities to develop 
marketable knowledge, skills, and abilities, and serves as the bridge between school and work. 

Major Requirements: 

PY 101 Principles of Psychology 3 hours 

PY 201 Psychology of Religion 3 hours 

PY 307 Statistical Methods 3 hours 

Select from: PY 301 Social Psychology, 

PY 319 Theories of Personality, 

PY 321 Abnormal Psychology, and 

PY 325 Developmental Psychology 9 hours 

PY 371 Biological Psychology 3 hours 

PY 41 1 Principles of Research 3 hours 

PY 422-424 Counseling Practicum 4 hours 

PY460 Experimental Psychology 3 hours 

PY 460L Experimental Psychology Lab 1 hour 

PY 480 Seminar in Psychology 2 hours 

PY or SO Electives 9 hours 

SO 101 Principles of Sociology 3 hours 

Counseling or Industrial/Organizational Emphasis* 9 hours 

Total 55 hours 



175 



Xounseling emphasis: 

Select from (one must be PY 421 or 423): 

PY 331 Group Dynamics, 

PY 421 Counseling Skills, 

PY 423 Counseling Theories, and 

PY 430 Psychological Testing 6 hours 

PY 340 Behavior Disorders in Children, or 

PY 431 Black Psychological Perspectives, or 

SO 361 Marriage and the Family 3 hours 

Mndustrial/Organizational emphasis: 

PY 351 Industrial Psychology 3 hours 

PY 421 Counseling Skills or PY 423 Counseling Theories 3 hours 

PY 430 Psychological Testing 3 hours 



Minor in Correctional Science 

PY 101 Principles of Psychology 3 hours 

PY 321 Abnormal Behavior 3 hours 

PY 398 Psychology and the Law 3 hours 

PYorSO Electives 6 hours 

SO 101 Principles of Sociology 3 hours 

SO 301 Sociology of Deviant Behavior or SO 398 Probation 3 hours 

Total 21 hours 



Minor in Psychology 

PY 101 Principles of Psychology 3 hours 

PY 201 Psychology of Religion 3 hours 

Select from: PY 301 Social Psychology, 
PY 31 9 Theories of Personality, 
PY 321 Abnormal Behavior, and 

PY 331 Group Dynamics 9 hours 

PY 421 Counseling Skills 3 hours 

PY Elective 3 hours 

Total 21 hours 



Minor in Sociology 

SO 101 Principles of Sociology 3 hours 

SO 231 Social Problems 3 hours 

SO 241 Race Relations 3 hours 

SO Electives (upper division) 12 hours 

Total 21 hours 



176 



Description of Courses 
Psychology 

PY 095 Scholarship Skills 2 hours 

This course is required during the first semester of all beginning freshmen on academic 
probation or with low ACT or SAT scores. Other freshmen whose college GPA falls below 2.00 
will also have to take this course the following semester, unless they have already passed it. 

PY 101 Principles of Psychology 3 hours 

An overview of the science of psychology, including such concepts as emotion, motivation, 
adjustment, perception, learning, personality, abnormal behavior, therapies, intelligence, 
measurement, and experimental methods. 

PY 201 Psychology of Religion 3 hours 

A study of the psychological aspects of religion and an analysis of several systems in 
psychology from a Christian perspective, utilizing the writings of Ellen G. White along with other 
Christian authors. 

PY 221 Personal and Social Adjustment 3 hours 

This course focuses on applying basic psychological theories and concepts to enhance 
personal growth and interaction with others. Topics include gender roles/ identity, self-esteem, 
assertiveness, stress management, communication, intimacy, and other related areas. Pre- 
requisite: PY101. 

PY 301 Social Psychology (W) 3 hours 

The study of group affiliations, group standards, social perceptions, and other social factors 
influencing the behavior of individuals and interaction among groups. Prerequisite: PY 1 01 . 

PY 307 Statistical Methods 3 hours 

An introduction to statistical procedures. Topics include preparation and use of graphs and 
tables, measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability and sampling, and tests of 
significance and association. Prerequisites: PY 101 and MA 101 . 

PY 319 Theories of Personality (W) 3 hours 

A study of the main theories of personality structure, with consideration of the essential 
ingredients of healthy attitudes and behavior patterns. Prerequisite: PY 1 01 . 

PY 321 Abnormal Behavior 3 hours 

A study of the types, natures, and causes of abnormal behavior; the effects of maladaptive 
behavior on individuals, families, and communities; and methods of treatment. Prerequisite: 
PY101. 

PY 325 Developmental Psychology 3 hours 

A study of current psychological theories relating to psychological development throughout the 
entire life span. Prerequisite: PY101. 

PY 331 Group Dynamics 3 hours 

A study of the dynamics of groups, with special emphasis being placed upon patterns of 
leadership, solidarity, cohesion, conflict, accommodation, and cooperation. Prerequisite: PY 
101. 



177 



PY 340 Behavior Disorders in Cliildren 3 hours 

This course is designed to give the student a descriptive and theoretical survey of the major 
forms of child psychopathology, with a detailed analysis of behaviors of children, methods of 
identification, and present methods of prevention and treatment. Prerequisite: PY 101 . 

PY 351 Industrial Psychology 3 hours 

Application of psychology to the study of industrial and personnel problems, including such 
areas as human relations, selection, training, employee motivation, and morale. Prerequisite: 
PY101. 

PY 357 Health Psychology 3 hours 

An introduction to the subfield of psychology, which investigates the psychological and 
behavioral aspects of physical health. Mental functioning as a causative factor in physical 
illness/wellness will be explored. Prerequisite: PY 1 01 . 

PY 361 Marriage and the Family 3 hours 

The ethics of family relationships, changing trends, and functions of the modern family. An 
attempt is made to bring the student into contact with facts, principles, attitudes, and problems 
that are likely to play a part in marriage. Prerequisite: SO 101. 

PY 371 Biological Psychology 3 hours 

Physiological correlates of behavior, with special emphasis on the physiology and anatomy of 
the nervous system as a basis for relating behavior to its physiological components. Develop- 
ment of competence in reading and interpreting scientific reports and professional journals. 
Prerequisite: PY 101. 

PY 380 Cognitive Psychology 3 hours 

Human cognition. Attention, knowledge representation, learning and memory, comprehen- 
sion, and problem solving. Contributions of neuroscience and connectionism to the develop- 
ment of cognitive theory, experimentation, and applications. Prerequisite: PY 101 . 

PY 398 Psychology and the Law 3 hours 

This course examines the U.S. legal system through the use of psychological concepts, 
methods, and findings. It offers coverage of topics relevant to understanding how psychology 
interfaces with the law. Prerequisite: PY101. 

PY 401 History and Systems of Psychology 3 hours 

A study of the theoretical systems, experiments, and personalities involved in the development 
of psychology. Prerequisite: PY101. 

PY 41 1 Principles of Research 3 hours 

An introduction to research in the behavioral sciences. Topics include problem definition and 
hypothesis formation; observation, definition, and measurement; design and control of basic 
types of experimental and quasiexperimental designs; and explanation and interpretation of 
results. Laboratory required. Prerequisite: PY 307. 

PY 421 Counseling Skills 3 hours 

This course acquaints the student with the practical applications of communication, helping 
skills, and counseling. Prerequisite: PY101. 



178 



PY 422-424 Counseling Practicum 2-2 hours 

Fifty-four hours each semester of supervised practical experience in a community mental 
health agency. Prerequisite: completion of or concurrent enrollment in PY 421 or PY 423. 

PY 423 Counseling Theories 3 hours 

This course involves a study of the major counseling theories. Prerequisite: PY 1 01 . 

PY 430 Psychological Testing 3 hours 

A course designed to familiarize students with the history of the development of psychological 
testing, the theory behind it, and the various objective and projective instruments used to 
assess intellectual and personality functioning. Prerequisite: PY101. 

PY 431 Black Psychological Perspectives 3 hours 

This course is designed to introduce the student to the issues and concerns regarding 
psychological development from a Black perspective. Prerequisite: PY 101 . 

PY 460 Experimental Psychology 3 hours 

A survey course acquainting the student with the experimental analysis of behavior. The 
scientific method is used to investigate basic behavioral phenomena and principles. Students 
will also develop competence in reading, writing, and interpreting reports. Prerequisite: PY 41 1 
or permission of instructor. 

PY 460L Experimental Psychology Lab 1 hour 

Controlled laboratory experiences will be provided to investigate verbal learning, individual 
differences, operant and classical conditioning, and other processes. Computer programs will 
be used to facilitate some of the laboratory exercises. 

PY 480 Seminar in Psychology 2 hours 

In-depth examination of particular topics of current interest in the field of psychology. Critical 
evaluation of current research. The course also reviews the graduation admission and 
employment searching process. Prerequisite: junior standing. 

PY 490-491 Research and Independent Study each 2-3 hours 

Majors in psychology desirous of getting an independent course of research are encouraged 
to do so under the direction of an advisor. Prerequisites: PY307, junior standing, and GPA 
of 3.00 or consent of instructor. 



Sociology 

SO 101 Principles of Sociology 3 hours 

An introduction to the field of sociology, terms and concepts related to human behavior, and 
the influences of social and cultural factors upon human behavior. 

SO 211 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology 3 hours 

An introduction to the study of humankind as total being, culture and social organization, 
interrelationships with habitat, and biophysical nature. 

SO 231 Social Problems 3 hours 

An analysis of areas of social behavior considered to be problems in contemporary American 
society. Prerequisite: SO 101 



179 



so 241 Race Relations 3 hours 

A scientific approach to the study of racial elements in the population of the United States, with 
particular emphasis on White and African-American groups. Prerequisite: SO 101 . 

SO 291 Introduction to Urban Studies 3 hours 

An analysis of the modern urban community and its pattern of organization. Emphasis will be 
placed on the culture of cities and problems facing the urban dweller. Urbanization is examined 
from an American perspective as well as from a world perspective. Prerequisite: SO 1 01 . 

SO 301 The Sociology of Deviant Behavior 3 hours 

Examination of criminality among juvenile and adult offenders. Also, an 

analysis of law-enforcement policies and a critical examination of legal, 
judicial, and penological systems. Prerequisite: SO 101. 

SO 320 Social Psychology 3 hours 

The study of group affiliations, group standards, social perceptions, and other social factors 
influencing the behavior of individuals and interaction among groups. Prerequisite: PY 101 . 

SO 361 Marriage and the Family 3 hours 

The ethics of family relationships, changing trends, and functions of the modern family. An 
attempt is made to bring the student into contact with facts, principles, attitudes, and problems 
that are likely to play a part in marriage. Prerequisite: SO 101. 

SO 398 Probation and Parole 3 hours 

A study of the role of the probation officer in the social rehabilitation of juvenile and adult 
offenders. Theory of probation and parole in relation to actual case histories. Techniques of 
counseling and guiding the adult and juvenile offender in and out of the correctional institution. 
Prerequisite: SO 101. 

SO 421 History and Theories of Sociology 3 hours 

A survey of the historical background of sociology and its development as a field of behavioral 
science, emphasizing basic theories of sociology and their significance to sociological 
research. Prerequisite: SO 101. 



^ 



180 



Department of Religion and Theology 



Professors: Baker, Samson, Warren 

Associate Professors: Allen (Chair), Burton, Doggette 
Assistant Professors: Humphrey, Lampkin, Li, Shand 

IWajors: Bible Worker Instructorship (A. A.) 

Church Leadership (Certificate) 
Ministerial Theology (B.A.) 
Publishing Ministry (Certificate) 
Religion (B.A.) 
Religious Education (B.S.) 

IVlinors: Biblical Interpretation 

Biblical Languages 
Religion 
Ministerial Theology 



Purpose 

The purpose of the Department of Religion and Theology is to provide a Christ-centered, 
distinctively Seventh-day Adventist, clinically grounded theological education for students in 
preparation for parish ministry, evangelism, teaching, chaplaincy, and pastoral counseling. The 
department serves the general student body of Oakwood College through the provision of religion 
courses across the curriculum. The religion and theology program is designed to prepare 
individuals for effective service to the church and humanity. The department also serves as a 
resource to all college departments for the promotion of faith and learning. 

Application for Admission 

To be admitted as a major in ministerial theology (orthe Pre-Seminary Program), a student must 
file a formal application with the department the first semester of his or her sophomore year, at which 
time a list of standards for admission and candidacy will be given. These standards include a battery 
of diagnostic tests; a cumulative GPA of 2.00; demonstrated proficiency in English communication, 
particularly by passing EN 111-112 Freshman Composition; and evidence of moral, emotional, 
social, and physical maturity. Students are admitted to the Ministerial Theology Program upon 
approval by the department faculty at the beginning of the junior or third year. 

Career Opportunities 

Graduates from this department have become church pastors; evangelists; church administrators; 
Bible workers; hospital, military, and prison chaplains; literature ministers; and missionaries. 

Exit Examination 

During the senior year, a comprehensive examination will be administered covering four areas 
of competency: biblical, including biblical languages; theological; historical; and practical. The 
minimum passing grade for this examination is C. 



181 



Forum 

As the student organization for the Religion and Theology Department, the Forunn meets 
weekly and presents a structured program to the department's student body and campus public on 
a range of biblical and theological topics. The programs take the form of panel discussions, 
sermons, religious musicals, and presentations by students, faculty, and invited guests. 



Bachelor of Arts in Ministerial Theology 

The ministerial theology major is designed to prepare the student for pastoral and evangelistic 
ministry. It provides the basic knowledge and skills necessary for pastoral employment and for 
admission to graduate education at the Seventh-day Adventist Theological Seminary. 

Major Requirements: 

RE 100 Introduction to Ministry 2 hours 

RE 105 Religion and Language 2 hours 

RE 200 Dynamics of Christian Living 2 hours 

RE 201 , 202 Fundamentals of Christian Faith 6 hours 

RE 211 Black Liturgy 2 hours 

RE 221 Jesus and the Gospels 3 hours 

RE 301 , 302 Old Testament Prophets 6 hours 

RE 31 1 Prophetic Interpretation: Daniel 3 hours 

RE 312 Prophetic Interpretation: Revelation 3 hours 

RE 321-322 Homiletics and Preaching (must take at Oakwood) 6 hours 

RE 331 Gift of Prophecy 3 hours 

RE 412 Acts and Epistles 3 hours 

RE 422-423 Pastoral Ministry (must take at Oakwood) 6 hours 

RE 424 Public Evangelism 2 hours 

RE 441 Bible Manuscripts 2 hours 

RE 451 Contemporary Theology 3 hours 

Select from: RE 249 Philosophy, RE 345 World Religions, 

RE 450 Ethics, and RE 444 Hebrews 4 hours 

BL 211-212 Beginning Greek 6 hours 

BL 31 1-312 Intermediate Greek 6 hours 

HI 444 Church History or HI 446 Age of Reformation 3 hours 

Total 73 hours 

General Education Requirement Variation: 

BL 21 1 -21 2 Beginning Greek substitutes for the foreign language requirement for ministerial 
theology majors, but not for religion majors. 

No minor is required for ministerial theology majors, but because of the large number of 
persons preparing for the pastoral/evangelistic ministry and the increased value of training in a 
nonministerial profession, it is recommended that every theology major have a double major, which 
may take up to five years to complete. 



182 



Bachelor of Arts in Religion 

Major Requirements: 

RE 105 Religion and Language 2 hours 

RE 1 11 Life and Teachings of Jesus 3 hours 

RE 200 Dynamics of Christian Living 2 hours 

RE 201, 202 Fundamentals of Christian Faith 6 hours 

RE 249 Introduction to Philosophy 2 hours 

RE 301 or 302 Old Testament Prophets 3 hours 

RE 31 1 Prophetic Interpretation: Daniel 3 hours 

RE 312 Prophetic Interpretation: Revelation 3 hours 

RE 323 The Work of the Bible Instructor 3 hours 

RE 331 Gift of Prophecy 3 hours 

RE 345 World Religions 2 hours 

RE 412 Acts and Epistles 3 hours 

RE 425 Christian Literature Salesmanship 2 hours 

RE 441 Bible Manuscripts 2 hours 

RE 451 Contemporary Theology 3 hours 

RE Electives 3 hours 

ED 130 Orientation to Teaching 2 hours 

ED 240 Principles of Teaching or 

ED 254 History, Philosophy, and Foundations of Education 3 hours 

HI 314 Denominational History 3 hours 

HI 325 African Civilization or HI 364 West African History 3 hours 

FS 305 Parenting or SO 361 Marriage and the Family 3 hours 

PY201 Psychology of Religion or SO 241 Race Relations 3 hours 

PY421 Counseling Skills 3 hours 

Total 65 hours 

Minor is not required. 



Bachelor of Science in Religious Education 

This program qualifies a person to teach secondary school Bible and to begin graduate study 
in such areas as school administration, religious education, guidance, and counseling. After 
graduation, students may apply for the SDA Basic Teaching Certificate: Religion, grades 7-1 2. 

Refer to the Department of Education section in this bulletin for the program outline. Program 
advisor: M. Warren. 



Associate of Arts Degree in Bible Worker Instructorship 

This two-year curriculum prepares the graduate to assist pastors and evangelists as a Bible 
instructor. Practical methods of soul-winning are emphasized. 

Major Requirements: 

RE 101 Introduction to the Bible or RE elective 3 hours 

RE 111 Life and Teachings of Jesus 3 hours 

RE 201 and 202 Fundamentals of Christian Faith 6 hours 



183 



RE 311 Daniel or RE 312 Revelation 3 hours 

RE 321 Homiletics and Preaching 3 hours 

RE 323 The Work of the Bible Instructor 3 hours 

RE 331 Gift of Prophecy 3 hours 

RE 412 Acts and Epistles 3 hours 

RE 424 Public Evangelism 2 hours 

RE 451 Contemporary Theology 3 hours 

Select from: BL 21 1 New Testament Greek, HI 314 Denominational History, 

PY 422 Counseling Practicum, PY 431 Black Psychological Perspectives, 

RE 301 , 302 Old Testament Prophets, 

RE 441 Bible Manuscripts and RE 490 (1 hour), or 

SW201 Introduction to Social Welfare 3 hours 

Total 35 hours 



Certificate in Church Leadership ^ 

This one-year program prepares the participant for effective lay leadership or self-supporting •^ 
ministry. |^ 

IVIajor Requirements: ^ 

RE 101 Intro, to the Bible or RE 323 Bible Instructorship 3 hours 

RE 111 Life and Teachings of Jesus 3 hours •* 

RE 201 and 202 Fundamentals of Christian Faith 6 hours f^ 

RE 311 Daniel or RE 312 Revelation 3 hours 

RE 321-322 Homiletics and Preaching 6 hours 

RE 331 Gift of Prophecy 3 hours 

RE 422 Pastoral Ministry 3 hours 

RE 424 Public Evangelism 2 hours 

RE 425 Literature Salesmanship 2 hours 

Total 31 hours 



Certificate in Publishing Ministry 

This one-year program focuses on the basic skills for selling Christian literature. On-campus 
and field practicum are included. 

Major Requirements: 

RE 111 Life and Teachings of Jesus 3 hours 

RE 31 1 Prophetic Interpretation: Daniel 3 hours 

RE 312 Prophetic Interpretation: Revelation 3 hours 

RE 321 Homiletics and Preaching 3 hours 

RE 331 Gift of Prophecy 3 hours 

RE 425 Christian Literature Salesmanship 2 hours 

BA 100 Business Math 3 hours 

BA210 Principles of Accounting 3 hours 

BA 475 Business Law 3 hours 



184 



PY 101 Introduction to Psychology 3 hours 

Free elective 2 hours 

Total 31 hours 



Minor in Biblical Interpretation (for theology majors only) 

BL 41 1-41 2 Beginnig Classical Hebrew 6 hours 

RE 325 Preaching the Hebrew Bible 3 hours 

RE 421 Principles of New Testament Interpretation 3 hours 

RE 431 Principles of Old Testament Interpretation 3 hours 

RE 490 Research and Independent Study (NT) 3 hours 

Total 18 hours 



Minor in Biblical Languages 

BL211 Beginning New Testament Greek 3 hours 

BL212 Beginning New Testament Greek 3 hours 

BL 31 1 Intermediate New Testament Greek 3 hours 

BL312 Intermediate New Testament Greek 3 hours 

BL411 Beginning Classical Hebrew 3 hours 

BL412 Beginning Classical Hebrew 3 hours 

RE 325 Preaching the Hebrew Bible or 

RE 490 Research (Greek) 3 hours 

Total 21 hours 



Minor in Ministerial Theology (not for religion majors) 

RE 111 Life and Teachings of Jesus 3 hours 

RE 201 or 202 Fundamentals of Christian Faith 3 hours 

RE 21 1 Black Liturgy or RE 423 Public Evangelism 2 hours 

RE 311 Daniel or RE 312 Revelation 3 hours 

RE 321 Homiletics and Preaching 3 hours 

RE 422 or 423 Pastoral Ministry 3 hours 

RE 301 or 302 O.T. Prophets or RE 412 Acts and Epistles 3 hours 

Total 20 hours 



Minor in Religion (not for theology majors) 

RE 111 Life and Teachings of Jesus 3 hours 

RE 201 or 202 Fundamentals of Christian Faith 3 hours 

RE 211 Black Liturgy 2 hours 

RE 31 1 Daniel or RE 312 Revelation 3 hours 

RE 323 The Work of the Bible Instructor 3 hours 

RE 331 Gift of Prophecy 3 hours 

RE 451 Contemporary Theology 3 hours 

Total 20 hours 



185 



Description of Courses 
Biblical Languages 

BL 21 1-21 2 Beginning New Testament Greek 3-3 hours 

These courses are designed to familiarize tlie student with the fundamentals of Greek grammar 
and sentence structure as found in the Greek New Testament. Vocabulary drills, simple 
translation, and reading exercises are provided in each lesson. A one-hour weekly lab is 
required. 

BL 31 1 -31 2 Intermediate New Testament Greek 3-3 hours 

Intermediate New Testament Greek consists of a comprehensive review of Greek grammar 
and syntax, translation of selected passages in the Greek New Testament, Greek vocabulary 
building through word studies, and elementary Greek work classifications. This course will 
emphasize some advanced principles of exegesis. Primary emphasis in this course relates to 
the use of Greek as a research tool and as a tool for more effective preaching. A one-hour 
weekly lab is required. Prerequisite: BL 212. 

BL 41 1 -41 2 Beginning Classical Hebrew 3-3 hours 

A survey of the most prevalent language found in the Old Testament, with emphasis on syntax, 
sentence structure, vocabulary, reading, and translation. The objective is not only to better 
equip the student for graduate work in biblical study but also to provide him /her with a useful 
tool for an accurate interpretation and understanding of the Bible during his/her college career 
and during his/her personal study. Because Hebrew is not required in the theological 
curriculum, it is offered only upon special request to the department. 

Religion 

RE 100 Introduction to Ministry 2 hours 

An introduction to ministry designed to acquaint majors with the call and role of the minister, as 
well as the broad spectrum of career options in ministry. Through the use of practicing 
professionals, students will be exposed to the many facets of ministerial service. Students will 
participate in a battery of diagnostic tests designed to acquaint them with the demands of 
ministry. This course is required of all freshman theology students and all transfer theology 
students. 

RE 101 Introduction to the Bible 3 hours 

A survey of the setting and content of biblical writings, with emphasis on selected biblical 
themes. 

RE 105 Religion and Language 2 hours 

A study of language and its relationship to religion, and its task to depict reality in religious 
expressions. Emphasis is given also to linguistic accuracy grammatically, syntactically, and 
philosophically, whether in spoken or written form. 

RE 1 1 1 Life and Teachings of Jesus 3 hours 

A review of the life of the Master Teacher and a study of the principles and parabolic 
representations of Christian life and faith as revealed in the Gospels. Prerequisite: two years 
of high school Bible or RE 101. 



186 



RE 200 Dynamics of Christian Living 2 hours 

A study of how one receives Jesus Christ, becomes a Christian, and remains a Christian. The 
course explores the realm of a personal relationship with God, including the steps to Christ, 
prayer, spiritual growth standards, and personal witnessing. 

RE 201 , 202 Fundamentals of the Christian Faith 3,3 hours 

An extensive study of the fundamentals of Christian doctrines as believed and taught by 
Seventh-day Adventists. Prerequisite: two years of high school Bible or RE 101 . 

RE 211 Black Liturgy — A Historical Analysis 2 hours 

An examination of the specific role of the Black Seventh-day Adventist Church in the 
community, also entailing a psychological analysis and description of Black worship. 

RE 221 Jesus and the Gospels (W) 3 hours 

The description is the same as for RE1 11 , but this section is intended specifically for religion 
and theology majors. The class will put special emphasis on issues raised by modern 
scholarship, such as the quest forthe historical Jesus, the synoptic problem, form and redaction 
criticism, the different genres, as well as the Sitz im Leben of diverse passages. Prerequisite: 
EN 112. 

RE 249 Introduction to Philosophy 2 hours 

An introduction to the thought of great thinkers, past and present, concerning the nature of 
reality. The course will focus on the best thinking on epistemology, metaphysics, empiricism, 
political philosophy, philosophy of religion, logic, and ethics. 

RE 301 , 302 Old Testament Prophets (W) 3-3 hours 

A study of the major and minor prophets in their chronological sequence, tracing the hand of 
God in the history of Israel and Judah and the promises of redemption to all nations through the 
Messiah. Attention is given to the historicity of these books along with their literary and spiritual 
values. Prerequisite: RE 1 1 1 and 201 or 202. 

RE 311 Prophetic Interpretation: Daniel (W) 3 hours 

A study of the book of Daniel, in which historical backgrounds and pertinence to the times are 
stressed. Prerequisite: RE 201 or 202. 

RE 312 Prophetic Interpretation: Revelation (W) 3 hours 

A study of this book of prophecy, with special attention given to the portrayal of the controversy 
between the true and the apostate church forces. Prerequisite: RE 201 or 202. 

RE 321-322 Homiletics and Preaching (W) 3-3 hours 

A study of the preparation and delivery of sermons and gospel addresses. The course stresses 
the mechanics of sermon construction and analysis, and provides adequate exercises to 
ensure some proficiency in both the construction and delivery of gospel messages. Prereq- 
uisites: RE 1 1 1 , 201 , 202, 331 , and BL 21 2. (Greek may be waived for religion majors.) 

RE 323 The Work of the Bible Instructor 3 hours 

A course designed to explore the principles and techniques of Bible teaching and personal 
evangelism. Field work is required. Prerequisites: RE 1 1 1 , 201 , and 202. 



187 



RE 325 Preaching the Hebrew Bible (W) 3 hours 

This course focuses on preaching from the Hebrew narrative. Students will be instructed in the 
variety of ways of analyzing Hebrew narrative and utilizing aspects of this to inform their 
preaching and make the Hebrew Bible more relevant to today. Prerequisites: EN 1 1 2, RE 31 2 
and RE 322. 

RE 331 The Gift of Prophecy (W) 3 hours 

A course of study tracing prophetic ministry in the Bible, and especially in the experience of Ellen 
G. White, while noting also its contributory role in the history and operation of the Seventh-day 
Adventist Church from the nineteenth century to the present. Prerequisite: RE 201 or 202. 

RE 345 World Religions 2 hours 

An introduction to the major religions of the world and their relation to Christianity. Prerequisite: 
junior standing. 

RE 41 2 Acts and Epistles (W) 3 hours 

A historical and exegetical study and survey of the book of Acts and the Epistles of Paul, tracing 
the origin of the Christian church, the spread of the gospel from Jerusalem to Rome, the 
historical setting and purpose for the Pauline letters, their relationships to doctrinal develop- 
ments, and their usage in the Christian church. Prerequisites: RE 1 1 1 , 201 or 202, 3 hours 
of upper division religion, and BL 212. 

RE 421 Principles of New Testament Interpretation (W) 3 hours 

An introductory course designed to cover the history, theory, and practice of New Testament 
Interpretation. It will trace the history of interpretive traditions from the Alexandrian and 
Antiochene school that influenced medieval interpretation to the modern trends rooted in the 
Reformation era and expressed in the various branches of Evangelical and historical-critical 
theology. A step by step guideline toward the understanding and exposition of passages 
representing the various literary genres of the New Testament will be developed. The class will 
pay attention to some of the new trends in literary criticism, such as rhetoric, structural exegesis, 
social studies, narrative criticism, feminist and womanist reading of the Bible, etc. , as they apply 
to the Seventh-day Adventist preacher and scholar. Prerequisites: EN 1 12 and BL 312 

RE 422- 423 Pastoral Ministry 3-3 hours 

A study of the work of the pastor and his soul-winning activities, counseling, church services, 
administrative responsibilities, community interests, and preaching. Prerequisites: RE 100 
and 322. 

RE 424 Public Evangelism 2 hours 

A study of the duties of the evangelist and his/her associates in the conducting of evangelistic 
campaigns. Prerequisite: junior standing. 

RE 425 Christian Literature Salesmanship 2 hours 

An introduction to the theory and practice of literature ministry, its goals, processes, mission, 
and rewards. Prerequisite: junior standing. 

RE 431 Principles of Old Testament Interpretation (W) 3 hours 

This course is intended to introduce the student to hermeneutics, the study of the principles of 
interpretation. Attention will be given to the historical setting of the Hebrew Bible (OT) 
interpretation, its content, the formation of this corpus, the major literary and theological 
traditions of the OT, and the methodology and results of the grammatico-historical approach 



188 



to biblical scholarship. Of particular interest would be the use of narrative exegesis as an 
interpretive tool. Prerequisites: EN 1 1 2 and BL 41 2. 

RE 441 Bible Manuscripts 2 hours 

A study of the history of the Bible, including its transnnission, preservation, manuscript 
evidence, text, canon, textual criticisnn, versions, and the development of the English Bible. 
Prerequisites: BL 212, and 31 1 or 41 1 . 

RE 444 Hebrews (W) 2 hours 

An exegetical analysis of the Epistle to the Hebrews, its place in the New Testament canon, 
cultural background, literary genre and structure, doctrinal perspectives, and theological 
significance for Seventh-day Adventism. Prerequisite: junior standing. 

RE 450 Christian Etiiics 2 hours 

A study of the Christian principles applicable to moral and ethical problems. Possible response 
of the Christian to such contemporary issues as race, poverty, and health care. Prerequisite: 
junior standing. 

RE 451 Contemporary Theology (W) 3 hours 

A study of themes in biblical and systematic theology, including the following: doctrine of God, 
soteriology, ecclesiology, the ministry, baptism, and the Lord's Supper. Attention will be given 
to the diversity of views held by different denominations. Prerequisites: RE 1 1 1 , 201 , 202, 
and 331. 

RE 490-91 Research and Independent Study each 1-3 hours 

A major research project tailored to the student's area of profession or major interest, and does 
not substitute for lecture courses. Prerequisites: permission by the department chair and a 
cumulative 3.00 GPA of all courses taken in this department. 




189 



Department of Social Work 



Professor: Fraser (Chair) 

Assistant Professors: Ashley, Brade, Mitchell 



Major: Social Work (B.S.W. 



Purpose 

It is the purpose of the Social Work Department to prepare students for entry-level, generalist 
practice for service to individuals, groups, families, organizations and communities. This prepara- 
tion includes an emphasis on personal and spiritual introspection and growth through the liberal arts 
foundation and core curriculum of social work values, ethics, knowledge, and skills. This prepares 
students to meet the changing need of clients, to be advocates for underserved populations, to 
promote social and economic justice, and to improve the conditions for all people regardless of race, 
ethnicity, culture, economic status, religion, sexual orientation, and physical or mental capability. 
The core curriculum and field practicum provide students with the knowledge, skills and values 
necessary to assess, plan, intervene, evaluate, and terminate service to diverse populations within 
the micro, mezzo, and macro systems. The program is accredited by the Council on Social Work 
Education. 

High School Preparation 

High school students who anticipate entering the field of social work should take as many 
regular academic courses as possible. Courses in social sciences and those relating to marriage 
and family and to the problems of society will be helpful, as well as any computer courses. 

Application for Admission 

To be admitted as a major in the Department of Social Work, students must have completed 
at least 30 hours of course work, including EN 1 1 2 Freshman Composition and SW 202 Introduction 
to Social Work, and have an overall minimum GPA of 2.50. Application forms must be obtained 
from, and returned to, the Social Work Department office. Applicants must complete an autobiog- 
raphy, a series of personality tests and an individual interview with the social work faculty. 
Admission to the program is a prerequisite for taking the following courses: SW 300, SW 320, SW 
334, SW 380, SW 390, SW 420, SW 451 , SW 452, SW 453, SW 454, SW 455 and SW 480. 

Application for the field instruction class for the fall semester must be submitted during the 
previous spring semester providing all lower division classes and foundation social work courses 
have been completed with a minimum GPA of 2.50 in classes in the major. Applicants to the field 
must have successfully completed the admission process and be enrolled in SW 451 during the 
spring semester prior to admission into SW 454. 

Exit Examination 

Social work majors who have reached senior status must pass an exit examination, which is 
administered during the fall semester. Any student who does not receive 70 percent or higher on 
this examination has opportunity to retake the test during the spring semester. All students must 
successfully complete this examination. Students who fail to meet this standard must enroll in a 
social work seminar and complete a qualitative examination. 

190 



Career Opportunities 

Students having a degree in social work may find employment in a large assortment of 
agencies. Some examples are: child welfare services, correctional facilities, day care, hospitals, 
mental health centers, nursing homes, public welfare, schools and senior citizens' homes. Also, 
employment may be found in public relations with public and private organizations, administrative 
areas where relationship skills are valuable, personnel areas, where a knowledge of human 
relations is essential, and/or research with various organizations. 



Bachelor of Social Work 

Social work majors are required to complete internships essential for integrating knowledge, 
values and skills. In SW 202 Introduction to Social Work, students complete 35 hours; in SW 300 
Generalist Skills and Practice, students complete 75 hours; and in SW 454 and 455 Field Instruction 
and Seminar I and II, students are required to complete a total of 500 hours (250 hours in each 
course) in an assigned social service agency. Transportation is the student's responsibility. 

Detailed information on the social work major is outlined in the Social Work Student Handbook, 
available from the departmental office for all majors. Additional information concerning the 
requirements for the field instruction courses are outlined in the Field Instruction /Wantva/ which is 
distributed to students in the spring semester of the junior year. Copies of the manual are also 
available in the departmental office. 

Major Requirements: 

SW 201 Introduction to Social Welfare 3 hours 

SW 202 Introduction to Social Work 3 hours 

SW 300 Generalist Skills and Practice 3 hours 

SW 320 Modern Social Work Theories and Practice 3 hours 

SW 330 Human Behavior and Social Environment I 3 hours 

SW 331 Human Behavior and Social Environment II 3 hours 

SW 334 Understanding Diversity and Oppression 3 hours 

SW 380 Welfare Policies 3 hours 

SW 390 Christian Philosophy of Social Work 3 hours 

SW 420 Research in Social Work 3 hours 

SW 451 General Methods of Micro Social Work 3 hours 

SW 452 General Methods of Mezzo Social Work 3 hours 

SW 453 General Methods of Macro Social Work 3 hours 

SW 454 Field Instruction and Seminar 1 7 hours 

SW 455 Field Instruction and Seminar II 7 hours 

SW 480 Career Preparation 2 hours 

EN 304 Advanced Composition 3 hours 

PY 307 Statistical Methods 3 hours 

PY411 Principles of Research 3 hours 

Total 64 hours 



Description of Courses 

SW 201 Introduction to Social Welfare 3 hours 

Astudy of the historical development of social welfare programs, practices, and policies. Open 
to nonmajors. 

191 



SW 202 Introduction to Social Work 3 hours 

An introduction to the development of the social work profession, interventive services and 
values, including volunteer experience in selected agencies. Open to nonmajors. Prerequi- 
site: SW201. 

SW 300 Generalist Skills and Practice 3 hours 

Examination of activities and skills used by social workers in direct practice. A preparation 
course for senior-level practice experience. Students are required to complete 75 hours in an 
agency. Prerequisites: SW 202 and SW 330. 

SW 307 International Social Work 3 hours 

This course focuses on most of the key economic, political, and social issues that shape 
human welfare, social development, and the role that social work plays in addressing these 
issues in an international context. Open to nonmajors. Offered alternate years. 

SW 31 2 Minority Aging 3 hours 

An introduction to aging, including minorities, cultural, social class and sexual differences, 
their needs, and the availability of related services. An examination of the cultural aging 
experience of elderly minorities. Prerequisite: SO 101 

SW 320 Modern Social Work Theories and Practice 3 hours 

This course provides the student with opportunities to examine and assess theories for social 
work practice in relation to the client, the social worker, and the setting in which they meet. 
Prerequisite: SW202. 

SW 330 Human Behavior and Social Environment I (W) 3 hours 

A study of the biological, psychological, social, cultural and spiritual foundations of develop- 
ment; their interrelationship for normal and abnormal behavior from infancy to the middle 
years; and functioning in the total environment. Prerequisites: Bl 1 01 , PY 1 01 and S0 1 01 . 

SW 331 Human Behavior and Social Environment II (W) 3 hours 

A continuation of SW 330. A study of the biological, psychological, social, cultural, and spiritual 
foundations of development; their interrelationship for normal and abnormal behavior from the 
middle years through old age; and functioning in the total environment. Prerequisite: SW 330 
or consent of instructor. 

SW 332 Child Welfare 3 hours 

A historical and contemporary analysis and study of social services for children. Open to 
nonmajors with special permission. Prerequisite: junior standing. 

SW 334 Understanding Diversity and Oppression 3 hours 

An analysis of the nature of oppression from a historical and social structural perspective. The 
social and interpersonal contexts of oppression, racism, discrimination, and powerlessness 
will be explored. Implications for social work practice on the micro, mezzo, and macro levels 
will be examined and analyzed for effective intervention. Prerequisite: SW 330. 

SW 380 Welfare Policies 3 hours 

An analysis of the formulation of federal and local policies, including social legislation, which 
influence the lives of individuals, families, groups, and communities. Emphasis on contempo- 
rary policies and legislation relevant to social welfare. Students will be required to analyze a 
policy. Prerequisites: SW 201 and PS 120 or 211. 



192 



SW 382 Human Sexuality 3 hours 

This course will study and analyze selected areas of human sexuality in order to equip 
students with a greater understanding of the personal and social nature of this complex and 
sensitive area. The course will provide knowledge concerning the physical, psychological, 
spiritual and cultural components of sexuality. The latitude in human sexual behavior and 
sexual dysfunctions will also be discussed. Open to nonmajors. Prerequisite: PY 1 01 or SO 
101. 

SW 390 Christian Philosophy of Social Work 3 hours 

A study of the underlying Christian principles utilized by the Christian social worker and an 
examination of church philosophy, which corresponds to the social work codes of ethics. 
Prerequisites: SW 201 , SW 202 and SW 320. 

SW 420 Research in Social Work 3 hours 

An advanced course in research which allows an in-depth application of research skills utilized 
in social work practice. Special attention will be given to the development of individual 
research projects. The student is required to carry out a research project to its completion. 
Prerequisite: PY 41 1 or consent of instructor. 

SW 451 General Methods of Micro Social Work 3 hours 

An introduction of the general method of social work intervention with individuals, families, 
groups, organizations, and communities, with emphasis on utilization of GIM with individuals. 
Prerequisite: SW331. 

SW 452 General Methods of Mezzo Social Work 3 hours 

A continuation of the general method with an in-depth study of the problem-solving method 
directed toward families, groups, and communities, with an emphasis on utilization of GIM 
with families and groups. Prerequisite: SW451. 

SW 453 General Methods of Macro Social Work 3 hours 

This course will provide experiences designed to help students become more effective in 
working with clients in micro, mezzo, and macro systems, with emphasis on macro level 
practice. Students will develop entry-level skills for working with communities and organiza- 
tions. Working in groups, students will develop grant writing skills and complete a community 
project which utilizes need assessment, resource development, and project implementation. 
Prerequisite: SW 452. 

SW 454 Field Instruction and Seminar I 7 hours 

A laboratory course designed to provide the student with supervised field practice in an 
approved agency selected by the department. Prerequisite: SW451 (SW 452 may betaken 
concurrently). 

SW 455 Field Instruction and Seminar II 7 hours 

A continuation of SW 454 in the same agency. Students demonstrate use of the general 
problem-solving method with more depth and independence. Prerequisite: SW 454. 

SW 480 Career Preparation 2 hours 

A lab course designed primarily to prepare for professional employment and/or continued 
training. Open to nonmajors. Prerequisite: junior standing. 

SW 490 Research and Independent Study 1 -3 hours 

This course will afford students the opportunity to do additional study in an area of interest 
under the direction of an advisor. Prerequisite: permission of the department chair. 

193 



Associate Professor: 
Assistant Professor: 



Adult and Continuing Education 

Fraser (Chair) 
McDonald 



l\/lajor: 



Organizational Management (B.S. 



Purpose 

It is the purpose of Adult and Continuing Education to meet the needs of working adults who 
are twenty-five years or older and have two or more years of college credits. Typically, these 
individuals are employed full-time and are unable to meet their educational needs through the 
traditional method. 

The Adult and Continuing Education Department offers a degree completion program that 
allows the adult student to earn a bachelor's degree by attending class one night a week on a 
year-round basis. Classes begin at different intervals during the year, thus allowing students the 
flexibility of planning their own course completion. Students meeting all prerequisites can com- 
plete the program in approximately 18 months. 

Application for Admission 

To be admitted into the Adult Degree Completion Program in organizational management, 
students must have met the following requirements: 

1 . Successful completion of a minimum of 60 semester hours from an accredited college/ 
post-secondary institution. 

2. Minimum age of 25, with at least two years of relevant work experience. 

3. GPA of 2.50 or better on a 4.00 scale on prior academic work. 

4. Completion of application form and payment of the $1 5 application fee. 

5. Official transcripts from all colleges and universities previously attended. 

6. Completion of credit for prior learning interview (waived if general education requirement 
has been met and a total of 84 semester hours have been accepted for transfer). 

7. Successful completion of writing sample. 



Any applicant not meeting some of the above-stated requirements may be considered for 
special admission by the LEAP Admission Committee. If accepted, the applicant will be informed 
of any general education courses still required, accompanied by a recommendation as to when 
and where they can be completed. 

Bachelor of Science in Organizational Management 

Major Requirements: 

OM 301 Module 1 Adult Development and Life Assessment 4 hours 

OM 303 Module 2 Foundations of Management 3 hours 

OM 305 Module 3 Group and Organizational Dynamics 3 hours 

RE 221 Module4 Jesus and the Gospels 3 hours 

Total Semester One 13 hours 

OM 306 Module 5 Survey of Research Design 3 hours 

OM 307 Module 6 Research Project Part I 2 hours 

OM 308 Module 7 Marketing for Managers 4 hours 



194 



J 



OM 309 Module 8 Personnel Management 3 hours 

OM 310 Module 9 Economics for Managers 4 hours 

Total Semester Two 16 hours 

OM 311 Module 10 Finance for Managers 3 hours 

OM 41 1 Module 1 1 Accounting for Managers 4 hours 

RE 451 Module 12 Contemporary Theology 3 hours 

OM 413 Module 13 Social Issues in Business 3 hours 

OM 414 Module 14 Research Project Part II 2 hours 

Total Semester Three 15 hours 

Total 44 hours 

General Education Requirements 

Computer and Health 5 hours 

Humanities 15 hours 

Natural Science and Mathematics 9 hours 

Social and Behavioral Sciences 9 hours 

Total 38 hours 

Total Electives 46 hours 

Total Graduation Requirements 128 hours 

For more information, consult the LEAP Program Student Handbook. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

OM 301 Adult Development and Life Assessment 4 hours 

Classical and contemporary adult development theories are examined in order to identify key 
themes in ones own life. Effective writing skills and the application of Kolb's writing model will 
be learned and applied in writing all papers that are prepared for this module. 

OM 303 Foundations of Management 3 hours 

Management control functions, strategic planning and organizational structure and design, 
motivational theory, leadership styles, negotiation concepts and skills, total quality manage- 
ment, and management by objectives are studied and contrasted. 

OM 305 Group and Organizational Dynamics 3 hours 

A study of group behavior and how group functioning affects organizational effectiveness. 
Emphasis is placed on decision-making and conflict resolution. Strategies are developed for 
efficient and productive group management to determine which tasks are best handled by a 
group or by an individual. 

OM 306 Survey of Research Design 3 hours 

An introduction to research and its tools, with specific emphasis on helping the student to 
complete the research project. Ideally, the project will focus on management and business. 
Content will include statistical methods, database research, and selecting a suitable topic. 



195 



OM 307 Research Project Part I 2 hours ^ 

The research topic is defined, suitable sources are located, and the actual research and ^^ 

writing are begun. The first presentation of this project is made to the group. The project is f^ 

supervised by a research adviser and requires documentation of 250 clock hours of prepara- ^^ 

tion time. The process is delineated in a timetable that culminates with the last class. ^^ 

OM 308 Marketing for Managers 4 hours ^ 

Content provides an understanding of how the marketing system has evolved over time, how ^"^ 

it presently functions, and how it is likely to develop in the future. Basic marketing theory and |^ 

terminology are studied and applied to analyzing real-world cases involving domestic and ^ 

international marketing opportunities and problems. ^^ 

OM 309 Personnel Management 3 hours ^ 

An exploration of the values and perceptions of an organization that affect social and eco- ^^ 

nomic life through an analysis of policies and procedures relating to recruitment, selection, ||S 

training, development, and compensation of employees. ^ 

OM 310 Economics for Managers 4 hours ||S 

A focus on the use of economics in making managerial decisions both within an organization ^ 

and in the larger market area. Issues involving scarcity and choice, the United States economy, ^^ 

price, production, cost, competition, money income, business cycles, and international trade f|S 

are explored. ^p 

OM 311 Finance for Managers 3 hours ^^ 

The course is designed to provide the adult learner basic foundation of finance that includes ^^ 
the nature and framework of financial markets and their use by investors, corporations, and ^'^ 
related institutions. The student will learn modern valuation techniques and capital asset pric- ||S 
ing, including but not limited to the arbitrage pricing, market efficiency, and portfolio theory. ^^ 
This foundation course will emphasize corporate finance in large and essentials of invest- 
ments in part to help the student get the core of finance. ( 

OM 411 Accounting for Managers 4 hours 

A managerial understanding of accounting and finance as reflected in financial statements, ( 

their relationship to each other, and how data in financial statements are used in evaluation, > 
planning, and control in an organization. 

OM 413 Social Issues in Business 3 hours 

A study of the ethical concepts that are relevant to resolving moral issues in business, with a 

focus on developing reasoning and analytical skills to apply these concepts to business deci- ( 
sions. It includes history, ethics, social responsibility, policy, economics, law, and other ar- 
eas. 

OM 414 Research Project Part II 2 hours 

A continuation of the process begun in OM 307. The project documentation is evaluated and 

a final oral report of the findings is presented to the adviser and the group. A final hard copy i 
of the research report based on program guidelines is turned in to the adviser. 

RE 221 Jesus and the Gospels 3 hours i 

This class will put special emphasis on issues raised by modern scholarship, such as the 
quest for the historical Jesus, the synoptic problem, form and redaction criticism, the different 
genres, as well as the Sitz im Lebem of diverse passages. 



196 



RE 451 Contemporary Theology 3 hours 

A study of themes in biblical and systematic theology, including the doctrine of God, soteriology, 
ecclesiology, the ministry, baptism, and the Lord's Supper. Attention will be given to the 
diversity of views held by different denominations. 



197 



Board of Trustees 

Calvin B. Rock, Chair Silver Spring, MD 

Joseph W. McCoy, Vice Chair Nashville, TN 

Don Schneider, Vice Chair Silver Springs, MD 

Delbert W. Baker, Secretary Huntsville, AL 

Matthew A. Bediako Silver Spring, MD 

Barry C. Black Virginia Beach, VA 

G. Alexander Bryant Kansas City, KS 

Charles Cheatham Pine Forge, PA 

Malcolm D. Gordon Decatur, GA 

Doris Gothard Washington, MI 

Frank W. Hale, Jr. Columbus, OH 

William Hicks Huntsville, AL 

Clarence E. Hodges, Sr. Silver Spring, MD 

Clifton R. Jessup Duncanville, TX 

Dennis C. Keith, Sr Silver Spring, MD 

Donald G. King Jamaica, NY 

James Kyle Buena Park, CA 

Harold L. Lee Columbia, MD 

James Lewis Columbus, OH 

Alphonso McCarthy Portland, OR 

Ezra Mendinghall Westlake Village, CA 

Vanard J. Mendinghall Adanta, GA 

Norman K. Miles Chicago, IL 

Jan Paulsen Silver Spring, MD 

Lois Peters Clarksville, MD 

Cynthia Powell-Hicks Anaheim Hills, CA 

Donald Pursley Loma Linda, CA 

Robert L. Rawson Silver Spring, MD 

Ralph Reid Kansas City, MO 

Gordon Retzer. Berrien Springs, MI 

John Street Philadelphia, PA 

Willie L. Taylor Altamonte Springs, FL 

Thomas L. Werner Winter Park, FL 

Eileen White Las Vegas, NV 

Edward Woods, Jr. Chicago, IL 

Billy Wright Dallas, TX 

William A. Murrain, Emeritus Stone Mountain, GA 

Advisory Board 

Carol Allen Huntsville, AL 

Samuel Bulgin Hamilton, Bermuda 

Richard P. Center Decatur,GA 

Sylvia Germany Huntsville, AL 

Alvin M. Kibble Silver Spring, MD 

Thomas J. Mostert. Jr Westlake Village. CA 

Orville Parchment Oshawa, Ontario, Canada 

JereD. Patzer Portland, OR 

HumbertoRasi Silver Spring, MD 

Charles Sandefur Lincoln, NE 

Benjamin D. Schoun South Lancaster, MA 

Ron Smith Hagerstown, MD 

WardD. Sumpter Decatur, GA 

Max Trevino Burleson, TX 

Mervyn Warren Huntsville, AL 



Administration and Staff 

DelbertW. Baker, Ph.D President 

John Anderson, Ph.D Provost and Vice President for Acadennic Affairs 

Sabrina Cotton, M.Acc, C.P.A Interim Vice President for Financial Affairs/Controller 

Timothy McDonald, Ed.D Vice President for Information Technology 

Anthony Medley, M.Div Vice President for Student Services 

Bruce Peifer, M.S Vice President for Advancement and Development 

Theresa Allen, M.A.T Director of Student Activities 

DedrickBlue, M.Div Chaplain 

Compton Brathwaite, B.S Director of Student Accounts 

Marcia Burnette, M.S Program Director, HUD and Special Projects 

Anthony R. Butler, B.S Associate Dean of Edwards Hall 

Gail Caldwell, B.B.A Chief Accountant 

Sherman H. Cox, M.Div Managing Director for Alumni Relations 

Gino D'Andrade, B.S Director of Security 

Minneola Dixon, M.L.S College Archivist 

Cynthia Douglas, B.S Director of Work Education and Career Serivces 

Belita Fleming, B.S Purchasing Agent 

Trevor Eraser, D.Min Director of Adult and Continuing Ed. 

Sylvia A. Germany, B.S Director of Human Resources 

Theodore Gunn, M.S Assistant Vice President for Student SePi/ices 

Ephraim Gwebu, Ph.D Director of Research 

James Hamer, B.S Director of Physical Plant 

Morris Iheanacho, M.S.L Catalog Librarian 



199 



Shirley Iheanacho, B.S Administrative Assistant to the President 

Deora Johnson, M.S Director of Counseling and Testing 

Jannith Lewis, Ph.D Director of Library Services 

Roy E. Malcolm, Ph.D Managing Director of Public Relations 

Adrienne Matthews, B.S Interim Resident Director of Carter Hall 

Savonia McClellan, R.N Director of Health Services 

Joan Mierez, B.S Associate Dean of Wade Hall 

PattI Miller-Landy, B.A Dean of Women 

Kelvin Mills, B.S Director of Sodexho Marriott Food Service 

Hattie D. Mims, B.S Director of Title III 

Elizabeth Mosby, M.S Reference Librarian 

Janis Newborn, M.A Director of Institutional Effectiveness 

Phillip Nixon, B.S Dean of Men 

James Payne, B.A Resident Director of Peterson Hall 

Juliaette Phillips, M.S.W Assistant Vice President for Academic Affairs 

Fred Pullins, M.Ed Director of Enrollment Management 

Shirley P. Scott, M.S Director of Records 

Ruby Shepard, M.A Resident Dean of Carter Hall 

William Smith, B.A Director of Literature Evangelism Training Center 

B. Fred Stennis, B.S Director of Financial Aid 

Ruth Swan, Ph.D Associate Director of Library Services 

Linda Webb, M.S Director, Freshman Studies Program 

and Center for Academic Advancement 

Vacant Director of Grants and Contracts 



200 



Academic Department Chairs 

Biological Sciences Anthony Paul, Ph.D. 

Business and Information Systems (Interim) Moges Selassie, M.B.A. 

Chemistry Kenneth LaiHing, Ph.D. 

Education Frances Bliss, Ph.D. 

English and Communications Derek Bowe, Ph.D. 

Family and Consumer Sciences Ruth Faye Davis, Ph.D. 

History Ciro Sepulveda, Ph.D. 

Mathematics and Computer Science John A. Blake, Ed.D. 

Music Lucile Lacy, Ph.D. 

Nursing Carol Allen, Ph.D. 

Physical Education Howard Shaw, Ph.D. 

Psychology (Interim) Belvia Matthews, Ph.D. 

Religion and Theology Gregory Allen, Th.D. 

Social Work Edith Eraser, Ph.D. 

Professors Emeriti 

Carl D. Anderson, Ph.D. Professor Emeritus of History 

B.Th., Pacific Union College, 1934; B.A., Pacific Union College, 1936; M.A., Andrews 
University,1957;Ph.D., American University, 1960. (1968-1975) 

Robert Buyck, Ph.D. Professor Emeritus of French 

Baccalaureat es Letters-philolophie, University of Nance, France, 1951 ; Licence es Letters, 
University of Toulouse, 1962; Ph.D., University of Colorado, 1971. (1959-1975) 

Emerson A. Cooper, Ph.D. Professor Emeritus of Chemistry 

B.A., Oakwood College, 1949; M.S., Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn, 1954; Ph.D., Michi- 
gan State University, 1959. (1948-1992) 

Ernest E. Rogers, Ph.D. Professor Emeritus of Biblical Languages 

B.A., Union College, 1943; M.A., Seventh-day Adventist Theological Seminary, 1952; Ph.D., 
Michigan State University, 1 967. (1 945-1 979) 

M. Irene Wakeham-Lee, Ph.D. Professor Emeritus of English 

B.A., Andrews University, 1934; M.A., University of Southern California,1 939; Ph.D. Stanford 
University, 1965. (1971-1975) 

Florence M. Winslow, M.A. Associate Professor Emeritus of English 

B.A., Knoxville College, 1934; M.A., Atlanta University, 1941. (1954-1984) 



201 



Faculty 

Carol Allen, Ph.D. Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia Union College, 1967; A.M., New York University, 1970; Ph.D., New York 
University, 1983. At Oakwood since 1998. 

Gregory Allen, Th.D. Associate Professor of Religion 

B.S., Atlantic Union College, 1976; M.Div., Andrews University, 1981; Th.D., Boston Univer- 
sity, 1995. At Oakwood since 1998. 

John Anderson, Ph.D. Professor of Management 

B.B.A., East Texas State University, Texarkana, 1975; M.B.A., East Texas State University, 
Texarkana, 1976; Ph.D., University of Arkansas, 1979. At Oakwood since 1998. 

Karen Anderson, M.S.N. Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Andrews University, 1 975; M.S.N., Ohio State University, 1 976. At Oakwood since 1 998. 

O. George Ashley, M.S.W. Assistant Professor of Social Work 

B.S.W., Oakwood College, 1987; M.S.W., York University, 1994; doctoral studies, Walden 
University. At Oakwood since 1997. 

Delbert W. Baker, Ph.D. Professor of Religion 

B.S., Oakwood College, 1975; M.Div., Andrews University, 1978; Ph.D., Howard University, 
1992. At Oakwood since 1996. 

Nigel Barham, Ph.D. Professor of History 

B.D., London University (England), 1964; Diploma in Education, Birmingham University (En- 
gland), 1965; M.A., Andrews University, 1968; Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1976. At 
Oakwood since 1968. 

Bernard W. Benn, Ed.D. Professor of English 

B.A., Atlantic Union College, 1959; M.A., Seton Hall University, 1960; Professional Diploma, 
Teachers College, Columbia University, 1963; Ed.D., Teachers College, Columbia Univer- 
sity. At Oakwood since 1977. 

Ursula T. Benn, D.A. Professor of Spanish 

B.A., University of Toronto, 1961; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University, 1964; D.A., 
Atlanta University, 1993. At Oakwood since 1978. 

T. Keld Billingy, M.H.A. Assistant Professor of Health Care Administration 

B.A., Oakwood College, 1 979; B.S., Oakwood College, 1 981 ; M.H.A,. Loma Linda University, 
1983. At Oakwood since 1999. 

John A. Blake, Ed.D. Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Howard University, 1963; M.S., Howard University, 1964; Ed.S., George Peabody 

College of Vanderbilt University, 1 974; Ed. D., University of Tennessee, Knoxville, 1 978. At 
Oakwood since 1964. 

Evelyn Blanch-Payne, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Psychology 

B.S., Tennessee State University, 1973; M.A., University of Dayton, 1976; Ph.D., Kent State 
University, 2000. At Oakwood since 1 998. 



202 



Frances H. Bliss, Ph.D. Professor of Education 

B. A., Oakwood College, 1948; M.S., A & T State University, 1974; Ph.D., Southern Illinois 
University, 1984. At Oakwood since 1974. 

Derek Bowe, Ph.D. Associate Professor of English 

B.S., Oakwood College, 1986; M.A., Andrews University, 1987. Ph.D., University of Ken- 
tucky at Lexington, 1 998. At Oakwood since 1 987. 

Kesslyn Brade, M.S.W. Assistant Professor of Social Work 

B.S.W., Oakwood College, 1995; M.S.W., Ohio State University, 1996. At Oakwood since 
1998. 

Faye Brathwaite, M.B.A. Associate Professor of Accounting 

B.S., Oakwood College, 1979; M.B.A., Atlanta University, 1981; C.P.A., 1983. At Oakwood 
1982 and since 1989. 

Wayne Bucknor, M.Ed. Instructor of Music 

B.A. and B.S., Oakwood College, 1994; M.Ed., Alabama A&M University, 1998. At Oakwood 
since 1998. 

Hyacinth Burton, M.S. Assistant Professor of Computer Information Systems 

B.S., University of Alabama-Huntsville, 1988; M.S., University of Alabama-Huntsville, 1997. 
At Oakwood since 1 997. 

Keith Burton, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Religion 

B.A., Oakwood College, 1 987; M.T.S., Garrett Evangelical Theological Seminary, 1 989; Ph.D., 
Northwestern University, 1994. At Oakwood since 1995. 

Luetilla Carter, Ed.S. Associate Professor of Psychology 

B.S., Hampton Institute, 1954; M.S., Alabama A&M University, 1975; Ed.S., Alabama A&M 
University, 1979. At Oakwood since 1973. 

Audley C. Chambers, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Music 

B.S., Oakwood College, 1986; M.A., Ohio State University, 1988; Ph.D., Northwestern Uni- 
versity, 1997. At Oakwood since 1994. 

Angelique Clay, M.M. Assistant Professor of Music 

B.S., Oakwood College, 1995; M.M., University of Kentucky, 1997; doctoral studies, Univer- 
sity of Kentucky. At Oakwood since 2000. 

Patrice Conwell, M.A. Assistant Professor of Communication 

B.A., Oakwood College, 1985; M.A., Rowan University, 1997. At Oakwood since 1997. 

Frank R. Contreras, D.M.A. Assistant Professor of Music 

B.M., Millikin University, 1965; M.M., East Carolina College, 1 966; D.M.A., West Virginia Uni- 
versity, 1 977. At Oakwood since 2000. 

Malcolm A. Cort, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Psychology 

B.Ed., West Indies College, 1976; M.S.P.H., Loma Linda University, 1983; Ph.D., Wayne 
State University, 1995. At Oakwood since 2000. 



203 



Cecily Daly, Ed. D. Associate Professor of English 

B.A., West Indies College, 1972; M.A., Western Carolina University, 1979; Ed.D., University 
of Alabama in Tuscaloosa, 1994. At Oakwood since 1985. 

Oliver J. Davis, D.A. Associate Professor of English 

B.A., Oakwood College, 1953; B.A., Pacific Union College, 1957; M.A., Atlanta University, 
1970; D.A., Middle Tennessee State University, 1988. At Oakwood since 1964. 

Ruth Faye Davis, Ph.D. Professor of Family and Consumer Sciences 

B.A., Emmanuel Missionary College, 1954; M.A., Michigan State University, 1959; Ph.D., 
University of North Carolina, 1978. At Oakwood since 1964. 

Minneola Dixon, M.L.S. Assistant Professor (Library) 

B.S., Oakwood College, 1951; M.L.S. , University of Alabama, 1990. At Oakwood since 
1970. 

Kathleen H. Dobbins, M. S. Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., Oakwood College, 1965; M.S., Purdue University, 1967; doctoral studies, George 
Peabody College. At Oakwood since 1967. 

James Doggette, D.Min Associate Professor of Religion 

B.A., Oakwood College, 1982; M. Div., Andrews University, 1985; D. Min., Claremont School 
of Theology, 1992. At Oakwood since 1993. 

Caryll Dormer, Ed.D. Associate Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Hunter College, 1973; M.S.N. , Medical College of Georgia, 1976; Ed.D., Vanderbilt 
University, 1988. At Oakwood 1973-1983 and since 1988. 

Kelley M. Duncanson, M.B.A. Assistant Professor of Accounting 

B.S., Oakwood College, 1989; M.B.A., Alabama A&M University, 1993. At Oakwood since 
1999. 

Juliet Ann Durant, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences 

B.S., University of West Indies, 1986; M.S., Alabama A&M University, 1994; Ph.D., Texas 
A&M University (1999). At Oakwood since 2000. 

Rennae Elliott, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Communications 

B.S., Livingston University, 1987; M.A., Andrews University, 1989; Ph.D., Ohio University, 
1994. At Oakwood since 1996. 

Flora Flood, M.S.N. Associate Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Columbia Union College, 1 967; M.S.N., Medical College of Georgia, 1 997. At Oakwood 
1974-80 and since 1998. 

Edith Eraser, Ph.D. Professor of Social Work 

B.A., University of Louisville, 1970; M.S., Boston University, 1972; Ph.D., Smith College of 
Social Work, 1 994. At Oakwood since 1 984. 

Trevor Eraser, D.Min. Associate Professor of Religion 

B.A., Atlantic Union College, 1 972; M.Div., Andrews University, 1 975; D. Min., Emory Univer- 
sity, 1996. At Oakwood since 1984. 



204 



Esther L. Gill, Ed.D. Associate Professor of Business Administration 

B.A., Oakwood College, 1953; M.Ed., Temple University, 1962; Ed.D., University of Ten- 
nessee, 1981. At Oakwood since 1962. 

Leia M. Gooding, Ph.D. Professor of English 

B.A., Oakwood College, 1967; M.A., Vanderbilt University, 1970; post-graduate studies, Ox- 
ford University, 1975-1976; Ph.D., Vanderbilt University, 1991. At Oakwood since 1972. 

Ruth Gunn, M.B.A. Assistant Professor of Business Administration 

B.S., Athens State College, 1983; M.B.A., Alabama A&M University, 1986. At Oakwood 
since 1986. 

Ephraim Tobela Gwebu, Ph.D. Professor of Chemistry 

B.S.Ed., Njala University College (University of Sierra Leone), 1973; Ph.D., Ohio State Uni- 
versity, 1978. At Oakwood 1978-1981 and since 1985. 

Keratiloe Gwebu, M.S.N. Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S.N., University of Alabama in Huntsville, 1981; M.S.N., University of Alabama in Hunts- 
ville, 1995. At Oakwood since 1994. 

Terry Hamilton, M.Ed. Instructor of Physical Education 

B.A., Oakwood College, 1984; M.Ed., Alabama A&M University, 2000. At Oakwood since 
1988. 

Bobby R. Harrison, M.S. Associate Professor of Art 

B.F.A., Andrews University, 1981; M.S., Alabama A&M University, 1983. At Oakwood since 
1991. 

Earl S. Henry, M.P.H. Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

B.A., Oakwood College, 1 983; M.P.H., Adventist University of the Philippines, 1 986; doctoral 
studies. University of the Philippines. At Oakwood since 1999. 

Kyna Hinson, M.A. Assistant Professor of Communications 

B.A., Columbia Union College, 1977; M.A., University of Georgia, 1979. At Oakwood since 
1986. 

Auldwin Humphrey, M.Div. Assistant Professor of Religion 

B.A., Oakwood College, 1966; M.Div., Andrews University, 1968. At Oakwood since 1997. 

Leslie D. Hutson, D.M.A. Assistant Professor of Music 

B.A., University of Alabama-Huntsville, 1982 M.Mus., University of Memphis, 1988; D.M.A., 
University of Alabama-Tuscaloosa, 1994. At Oakwood since 1999. 

Ramona Hyman, M.A. Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Temple University, 1979; Certificate, Howard University, 1982; M.A., Andrews Univer- 
sity, 1986. At Oakwood 1985-1988 and since 1989. 

Morris A. Iheanacho, M.S.L Assistant Professor (Library) 

B.S., Columbia Union College, 1965; M.S.L., Western Michigan University, 1970. At Oak- 
wood since 1980. 



205 



Harold Jacobs, M.B.A. Assistant Professor of Management 

B.S., Oakwood College, 1963; M.B.A., Alabanna A&M University, 1977. At Oakwood since 
2000. 

Lucile Lacy, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Music 

B.A., Oakwood College, 1968; M.M.Ed., George Peabody College, 1970; Ph.D., Ohio State 
University, 1985. At Oakwood since 1971 . 

Kenneth LaiHing, Ph.D. Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Richmond College, City University of New York, 1972; M.S., Long Island University, 
1981; Ph.D., University of Georgia, 1988. At Oakwood since 1982. 

Andy Lampkin, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Religion 

B.A., Oakwood College, 1991; M.T.S., Vanderbilt University, 1995; M.A., Vanderbilt Univer- 
sity, 1998; Ph.D., Vanderbilt University, 2000. At Oakwood since 2000. 

Laura Lee-Guey, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., National Taiwan University, 1963; M.S., Oregon State University, 1969; Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Illinois in Chicago, 1975. At Oakwood since 1996. 

Jannith L. Lewis, Ph.D. Professor (Library) 

B.S., University of Kansas, 1953; M.A. in L.S., Indiana University, 1955; Ph.D., Indiana 
University, 1982. At Oakwood since 1953. 

Tarsee Li, Ph.D. Assistant Professor 

B.A., Southen Missionary College, 1980; M.Div., Andrews University, 1988; M.Phil., Hebrew 
Union College, 1 997; Ph.D., Hebrew Union College, 1 999. At Oakwood since 2000. 

Seth G. Lubega, Ph.D. Professor of Biological Sciences 

B.A., Oakwood College, 1967; M.S., Howard University, 1969; Ph.D. Howard University, 
1 975. At Oakwood 1 971 -1 972 and since 1 976. 

Roy E. Malcolm, Ph.D. Professor of Psychology 

B.Th., Canadian Union College, 1962; M.A., Andrews University, 1963; Ph.D., Ohio State 
University, 1974. At Oakwood since 1968. 

Lloyd Mallory, M.A. Associate Professor of Music 

B.A., Oakwood College, 1 990; M.A., Morgan State University, 1 994. At Oakwood since 1 996. 

Belvia Matthews, Ph.D. Professor of Psychology 

B.S., Columbia Union College, 1966; M.A., Alabama A&M University, 1970; Ph.D., Michi- 
gan State University, 1977. At Oakwood since 1977. 

Nellie Burke Maulsby, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences 

B.S., Jacksonville State University, 1972; M.S., Auburn University, 1976; Ph.D., Purdue Uni- 
versity, 1 982. At Oakwood since 1 994. 

James B. Mbyirukira, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Education 

B.A., University of Lubumbashi, 1980; M.A., University of Iowa, 1986; Ph.D., University of 
Iowa, 1992. At Oakwood since 1999. 



206 



Lucreta McRoy, M.B.A. Assistant Professor 

B.A., University of Hartford, 1988; M.B.A. , Kent State University, 1993. At Oakwood since 
2000. 

Beverly McDonald, M.Ed. Assistant Professor of Adult Education 

B.A., Columbia Union College, 1962; M.Ed., University of Miami, 1972. At Oakwood 1972- 
1978 and since 1995. 

Timothy McDonald, Ed.D. Professor of Education 

B.S., Oakwood College, 1963; M.S., Atlanta University, 1968; Ed.D., University of Miami, 
1 972. At Oakwood 1 972-1 978 and since 1 995. 

Artie Melancon, Ed.D. Associate Professor of Education 

B.A., Pacific Union College, 1 951 ; M.Ed., University of Nebraska, 1 972; Ed.D., University of 
Nebraska, 1982. At Oakwood since 1976. 

India M. Medley, M.S.N. Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Loma Linda University, 1983; M.S.N., University of Alabama in Huntsville, 2000. At 
Oakwood since 1 997. 

Mavis B. Mitchell, M.S.W. Assistant Professor of Social Work 

B.A., Oakwood College, 1 984; M.S.W., San Diego State University, 1 986. At Oakwood since 
1999. 

Annette Mohan, M.A. Assistant Professor of Family and Consumer Science 

B.A., Universityof Bombay (India), 1972; M.A., Andrews University, 1980; M.A., Norfolk State 
University, 1991 . At Oakwood since 1998. 

Tungesh N. Mohan, M.A. Assistant Professor of Communication 

B.A., Allahabad University, 1 969; Diploma, Film and TV Institute of India, 1 972; M.A., Andrews 
University, 1980. At Oakwood since 1998. 

Gracie F. Monroe, M.Ed. Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., Oakwood College, 1968; M.Ed., Alabama A&M University, 1979. At Oakwood since 
1983. 

Julie Moore-Ellis, M.M. Instructor of Music 

B.M., Marygrove College, 1987; M.M., Mannes College of Music, 1990. At Oakwood since 
1999. 

Elizabeth Mosby, M.S.L.S. Associate Professor (Library) 

B.A., Oakwood College, 1962; M.S.L.S., Atlanta University, 1967. At Oakwood since 2000. 

Albert John Osei, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Physics 

B.S., University of Science and Technology, Ghana, 1 979; M.S., Queen's University (Canada), 
1985; Ph.D., Alabama A&M University, 1997. At Oakwood since 1994. 

Eurydice Osterman, D.M.A. Professor of Music 

B.A., Andrews University, 1972; M.Mus., Andrews University, 1975; D.M.A., University of 
Alabama, 1988. At Oakwood since 1978. 



207 



Darayas N. Patel, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.Sc, University of Bombay (India), 1979; M.S., University of Bombay (India), 1983; M.S., 
University of Alabama in Huntsville, 1988; Ph.D., Alabama A&M University, 1999. At Oak- 
wood since 1993-1995 and 1999. 

Havovi Patel, M.S. Assistant Professor (Nursing) 

M.B.B.S., University of Bombay (India), 1 985; M.S., Alabama A&M University, 1 993. At Oak- 
wood since 1 994. 

Dorothy J. M. Patterson, D.A. Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., California State University, Long Beach, 1969; Teaching Diploma, California State Uni- 
versity, Long Beach, 1970; M.S., Alabama A&M University, 1979; D.A., Middle Tennessee 
State University, 2001 . At Oakwood since 1 995. 

Anthony Paul, Ph.D. Professor of Biological Sciences 

B.S., Alabama A&M University, 1976; M.S., Alabama A&M University, 1981; Ph.D., Ala- 
bama A&M University, 1992. At Oakwood since 1979. 

Bruce Peifer, M.S. Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

B.S., Loma Linda University, 1979; M.S., Loma Linda University, 1986; doctoral studies, 
California Coastal University. At Oakwood since 1996. 

Juliaette W. Phillips, M.S.W. Associate Professor of Social Work 

B.S., Alabama State College, 1952; M.S.W., University of Pennsylvania, 1971. At Oakwood 
since 1974. 

Sandra Price, Ed.D. Professor of Management 

B.S., Athens College, 1969; M.S., Alabama A&M University, 1973; Ed.D., University of 
Tennessee, 1982. At Oakwood 1967-1991 and since 1992. 

Don Rufus Ranatunga, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., University of Peradeniya, Sri Lanka, 1979; M.S., Bowling Green State University, 1989; 
Ph.D., Purdue University, 1995. At Oakwood since 1998. 

Alexandrine Randriamahefa, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Biological Sciences 

B.S., Madagascar University, 1975; M.S., Madagascar University, 1980; Ph.D., Loma Linda 
University, 1994. At Oakwood since 1999. 

James A. Roddy, M.Ed. Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

B.A., University of Southern Mississippi, 1965; M.Ed., University of Southern Mississippi, 
1970. At Oakwood since 1965. 

Everett K. Roper, M.S. Assistant Professor of Computer Information Sys. 

B.S., University of Alabama in Huntsville, 1993; M.S., University of Alabama in Huntsville, 
1997; doctoral candidate, University of Alabama in Huntsville. At Oakwood since 1999. 

Agniel Samson, Th.D. Professor of Religion 

B.A., River Plate Adventist University (Argentina); M.S., University of Strasburg (France), 
1975; Th.D., University of Strasburg, 1977. At Oakwood since 1985. 



208 



Londa L. Schmidt, Ph.D. Professor of Biological Sciences 

B.A., Andrews University, 1961; M.S., Loma Linda University, 1968; Ph.D., Edinburgh Uni- 
versity (Scotland), 1982. At Oakwood since 1 994. 

Moges Selassie, M.B.A. Associate Professor of Finance 

B.A., Oakwood College, 1977; M.B.A., Alabama A&M University, 1979. At Oakwood since 
1979. 

Giro Sepulveda, Ph.D. Professor of History 

B.A., Loma Linda University, 1967; M.Div., Rochester Colgate Divinity School, 1972; M.A., 
State University of New York, 1974; M.A., Notre Dame University, 1974; Ph.D., Notre Dame 
University, 1976. At Oakwood since 2000. 

Lance Shand, M.P.S. Assistant Professor of Religion 

B.A., Oakwood College, 1960; M.P.S., New York Theological Seminary, 1977. At Oakwood 
since 1977. 

Howard Shaw, Ph.D. Professor of Physical Education 

B.S., North Carolina Central University, 1 976; M.S., North Carolina Central University, 1 977; 
Ed.S., George Peabody College , 1978; Ph.D., Vanderbilt University, 1985. At Oakwood 
since 1982. 

Selena Payton Simons, Ed.S. Assistant Professor of Nursing 

B.S.N. , Andrews University, 1973; M.S.N., Wayne State University, 1977; Ed.S., Andrews 
University, 1993. At Oakwood 1977-1981 and since 1993. 

Donna A. Smith, M.P.H. Assistant Professor of Dietetics 

B.S., University of Maryland, 1978; M.P.H., Loma Linda University, 1985; R.D., 1986. At Oak- 
wood since 1990. 

AnneSmith-Winbush, J.D. Assistant Professor of Political Science 

B.A., University of Illinois, 1 973; J.D., Miles Law School, 1 985; M.A., University of Alabama in 
Huntsville, 1 994. At Oakwood since 1 977. 

Marta Sovyanhadi, D.P.H. Assistant Professor of Health and Physical Education 

B.A., Indonesian Union College (Indonesia); M.P.H., Philippine Union College (Philippine), 
1 984; D.P.H., Loma Linda University, 1 995. At Oakwood since 2001 . 

Yeodono Sovyanhadi, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Biological Sciences 

M.S., University of Philippines, 1 985; Ph.D., Loma Linda University, 1 995. At Oakwood since 
1999. 

Ruth M. Swan, Ph.D. Professor (Library) 

B.S., Columbia Union College, 1969; M.S.L.S., Drexel University, 1975; M.A.T., Andrews 
University, 1983; Ph.D., Florida State University at Tallahassee, 1998. At Oakwood since 
1979. 

Karen Mosby Tucker, M.S. Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Oakwood College, 1975; M.Ed., Alabama A&M University, 1981; M.S., Alabama A&M 
University, 1987. At Oakwood since 1976. 



209 



Padma T. Uppala, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Biological Sciences 

B.S., Andhra University (India), 1976; M.S., Kakatitya University (India), 1978; Ph.D., Loma 
Linda University, 1991. At Oakwood since 1995. 

Alexander Volkov, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Moscow State University, 1972; M.S., Moscow State University, 1973; Ph.D., U.S.S.R. 
Academy of Sciences, 1982. At Oakwood since 1998. 

Barbara J. Warren, M.Ed. Associate Professor of Family and Consumer Sciences 

B.S., Columbia Union College, 1959; M.Ed., Alabama A&M University, 1981. At Oakwood 
since 1977. 

Mervyn A. Warren, Ph.D. Professor of Religion 

B.A., Oakwood College, 1957; M.A., Seventh-day Adventist Theological Seminary, 1959; 
B.D., Andrews University, 1961; Ph.D., Michigan State University, 1966; D. Min., Vanderbilt 
Divinity School, 1 975. At Oakwood since 1 961 . 

Linda L. Webb, M.S. Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Oakwood College, 1969; M.S., Alabama A&M University, 1973. At Oakwood since 
1973. 

Rehanna Whatley, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., University of the Panjab (Pakistan), 1 964; A.M., University of Michigan-Ann Arbor, 1 970; 
Ph.D., University of Saskatchewan (Canada), 1978. At Oakwood since 2000. 

Jillian Wills, B.S.N. Instructor of Nursing 

B.S.N., University of Alabama-Birmingham, 1 998. At Oakwood since 2000. 



210 



Index 



Absences 51 

Academic Advisement and Program Planning 48 

Academic Department Chairs 201 

Academic Grievance 52 

Academic Policies 35 

Academic Probation, Suspension, and Dismissal 45 

Academic Scholarship Program 16 

Academic Year 37 

Accounting 65, 69 

Administration and Staff 199 

Administrative Systems Management 66 

Admission Standards 12 

Adult and Continuing Education 194 

Advanced Placement Program 15 

Adventist Colleges Abroad 49 

Allied Health Program 83 

Applied Mathematics/Engineering 145 

Art 108 

Auditing Courses 44 

B 

Bachelor of Social Work 191 
Bible Worker Instructorship 183 
Biochemistry 81 
Biological Sciences 58 
Biology 59 

Biology Education 59, 91 
Buildings, Campus 10 
Bulletin Selection 53 
Business Administration 66 
Business and Information Systems 64 
Business Core Curriculum: 65 
Business Education 67, 92 



Calendar 4 

Campus Buildings 10 

Center for Academic Advancement 46 

Chemistry 80, 82 

Chemistry Education 82, 92 

Church Leadership 1 84 

Class Standing 39 

Classification of Students 38 

College Level Examination Program (CLEP) 4 i 



211 



Commercial Art 108 

Communications 104 

Computer Information Systems 68, 69 

Computer Science 145 

Cooperative Programs 49 

Correspondence Courses 44 

Counseling 176 

Counseling Center 32 

Course Numbers and Symbols 37 

Credit 37 

Cytotechnology 82 

D 

Dean's List 45 

Deferred Grades 43 

Degree Candidacy 57 

Department Curriculum Laboratories 49 

Department Course Fees 20 

Diagnostic Testing 48 

Dietetics 122 

Double Major 53 



Education 88 

Elementary Education 88, 93 

Ellen G. White Estate Oakwood Branch Office 49 

Engineering 145 

English 106 

English and Communications 103 

English Language Arts Education 93, 107 

English Proficiency Examination 40 

Errors and Coirections 45 

Exit Examination 41 



Faculty 202 

Family and Consumer Science Education 94, 123 

Family and Consumer Sciences 121, 123 

Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act 39 

Final Examinations 40 

Finance 68 

Financial Aid 23 

Financial Aid Policies 23 

Financial Policies 17 

Fitness and Wellness 1 30 

French 107 

Freshman Orientation Seminar 47 

Freshman Studies 46 



212 



General Education Requirements 55 

Geography 140 

Grade Point Average 43 

Grade Reports 45 

Grading System 43 

Graduation in Absentia 57 

Graduation Diplomas 57 

Graduation With Distinction 45 



H 



Health Care Administration 66 

History 137, 138 

Home Economics 123 

Home School Applicants 14 

Honor Roll 45 

Honors Convocation 45 

Human Development and Family Studies 124 

Human Environmental Sciences 121 



Incomplete Work 44 
Information Technology Center 48 
Interdisciplinary Studies 55 
International Studies 1 38 



Late Registration 39 

Library 48 

Life Experience Policy 41 

M 

Management 67 

Marketing 67 

Master of Arts in Teaching 90 

Master of Arts Teaching 90 

Mathematics 146 

Mathematics and Computer Science 144, 146 

Mathematics Education 95, 147 

MBRS Program 60 

Medical School Early Selection Program 53 

Medical Technology 83 

Medicine 53 

Message From the Presiden 3 

Ministerial Theology 182 

Minors 

Accounting 70 

African American Studies 139 

Art 109 

Biblical Languages 185 



213 



Chemistry 85 

Child Development 125 

Communications 109 

Computer Information Systems 70 

Computer Science 147 

Correctional Science 176 

English 109 

English (Writing Emphasis) 109 

Food and Nutrition 125 

French and Spanish 1 10 

History 139 

Home Economics 125 

Management 70 

Mathematics 147 

Ministerial Theology 1 85 

Music 158 

Physics 147 

Psychology 176 

Religion 185 

Sociology 176 
Mission 8 

Mission Statement 8 

Monitoring Students' Academic Progress (MSAP) 47 
Music 153, 155 
Music Business 156 
Music Education 156 
Music-Vocal/Choral Education 96 



N 



Natural Science 59 
Nursing 165, 167 

o 

Oakwood Facts 9 

Organizational Management 69, 194 

Orientation 47 



Pass/Unsatisfactory Procedures 43 
Photography 108 
Physical Education 130, 132 
Physical Education Teaching 97, 132 
Physical Therapy 84 
Pre-Occupational Therapy 84 
Pre-Physical Therapy 84 
Pre-Physician Assistant 84 
Pre-Speech Pathology 85 
Professors Emeriti 20 1 
Psychology 174, 175 
Publishing Ministry 184 



214 



Refund and Repayment Policy 19 

Registration 39 

Religion 183 

Religion and Theology 181 

Religious Education 97, 183 

Remedial Courses 47 

Remittance 1 8 

Repeated Courses 44 

Requirements for Associate Degrees 56 

Requirements for Baccalaureate Degrees 54 

Residence Halls 3 1 

Retention and Disposal of Student Records 39 



Schedule of Classes 37 
Second Bachelor's Degree 55 
Secondary Education 88 
Social Science 139 
Social Science Education 139 
Social Science Education 98 
Social Work 190, 191 
Sociology 176 
Spanish 108 
Special Services 48 
Special Students 38 
Student Citizenship 31 
Student Handbook 3 1 
Student Life and Services 28 
Student Missionary Program 50 
Student Records 39 
Study Load 37 
Summer School 5 1 



Theory and Composition 156 
Transcripts 51 
Transfer Students/Credits 16 
Transient Letters 51 



Verification of Enrollment 25 

Veterans, Admission 15 

Vocal Performance 157 

Vocal Performance and Pedagogy 157 

w 

Withdrawal 40 

Withdrawal From College Courses 40 



215 



Withdrawal From College Due to Disciplinary Action 40 
Work Education/Career Services 32 
Writing Emphasis Courses 50 



216 



J^Pf^^Ufl? 







2|e P?«^S = ^ "^ 

lit lijIS §-?l 

-rjX(NOj;^0SO3vOO-T=C — 00^ 






oil: 












■^-. ' ' * 














',vV:: 



-i^"''.';/'*.';^